PipeChat Digest #3048 - Wednesday, August 14, 2002
 
RE: A dash of Dutch (Part One - LONG)
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: A dash of Dutch (Part One - LONG)
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Tom's River Methodist Church
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
re 94th psalm rebuke
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Hammonds off-limits? naw ...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Drawknob layout
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Wind pressure
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: re 94th psalm rebuke
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: A dash of Dutch (Part One - LONG) From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 16:22:17 +0100         Hello,   Leading something of a high-speed life, it is good to slow things down = and travel by sea. There is something quite civilized about a leasurely = pace, Dinner on board and a good night's sleep before disembarking in = Holland the next morning.   The approach to Holland and the vast Rotterdam Europort (the largest = port in the world) is as fascinating as it is grotesque; a mass of = cranes and twisted pipework hauling into view, with huge ocean going = vessels loading and un-loading cargo from all four corners of the globe. = It would be impossible to calculate, but I suspect that the combined = length of all the oil pipes in Rotterdam would comfortably exceed the = combined length of every organ pipe in Holland placed end-to-end.   The centre of Rotterdam is scarcely less alarming....a modern city of = concrete and coloured glass, re-built from the flattened remains of a = once historic city. It was time to locate a rental car, which took = longer than anticipated and rather knocked on the head any prospect of = attending a celebrity concert at St Laurent's, Alkmaar that same = evening.   "We'll have to go up to Amsterdam and sample the night-life", I = suggested.   Mark's eyes lit up and we collected our little car from Hertz.   Mark is a confirmed Disco Bunny, and he was in his element as we partied = 'til late amongst the sleaze of Amsterdam; his legs eventually giving = out at 3am. Wobbling his way back to the car and complaining loudly, it = was indeed fortunate that a conveniently parked house-boat prevented a = head-long plunge into a canal; the occupants less than pleased as he = lay on his back on the deck giggling.   The next morning was another day and a chance to search out the REAL = Holland; the friendly people with a ready smile and the architectural = gems which abound in this otherwise featureless land.   Haarlem is a unique experience, even by Nederlands standards.......a = very beautiful place with a fine town square in which locals and = tourists gather to eat, drink, sightsee or chat. It is also the home of = the magnificent Frans Hals Museum, which we decided to visit first. = Eventually overwhelmed by an abundance of Old Master Paintings, it was = time to leave for the 15.00 hrs Orgel Konzert at the Grotekerk of = St.Baavo, but not before we stumbled almost into a small cabinet organ. = A quick investigation revealed that the organ did indeed play, was made = by the son of Christian Muller, Pieter Muller in 1772 and was made for = the orphanage in Haarlem. The fact that it had an alactric blower = attached and a plug in the wall suggested that it was in good playing = condition.   The Grotekerk dominates the town.....a large church by any standards. = The approach is through a tiny entrance on the South side. I never fail = to obtain delight in taking people into St.Baavo who do not know what to = expect. By devilish and cunning means, I always divert their attention = by drawing attention to the small organ opposite the entrance or = pointing out the rather plain sanctuary and clear glass. The trick is = then to spin them around to look down the nave to the organ case. The = response is ALWAYS utterly spontaneous......   I was not in the least bit surprised when Mark's jaw dropped wide open. = His verbal reaction was less predictable, consisting of two short words; = one with four letters and the other with two! I glanced around = nervously in case anyone had overheard and then got a small fit of the = giggles!   An almost miraculous sequence of events then followed. No sooner had = Mark said, "I'd love to hear that Toccata thingy played on this organ", = than the 3pm bell rang and, with brilliant sonority, an octave double = mordent on "a" pealed forth from the organ....trust the Dutch to be on = time!   As I glanced around to watch the reaction of tourists with children in = tow, I knew then why it was that BWV565 enjoyed universal popularity. = The first flourish caused a ripple of excitement which lit up faces, and = when that massive bottom "d" rumbled sonorously, complete with 32ft = reed, small children were held spell-bound and normally disinterested = youth stopped in its tracks with mouths agape, like rabbits caught in = the glare of headlights.   I knew in an instant that the organ had a future; especially in Holland!   A fair canter of a Fugue followed, which surprised me.....most Dutch = organists erring on the side of slow and deliberate. Nevertheless, in = spite of the reverberation (about 6 seconds), I never lost track of the = counterpoint (or lack of it!).......you cannot beat a vertical = disposition and an organ little more than 12ft deep against a wall.   The organist was Bas de Vroome, who plays the organs of the Niuewe and = Oudekerks in Delft. A winner of multiple organ playing prizes at major = organ festivals and now a tutor at the Rotterdam Conservatorium, we were = clearly in the hands of a very, very fine organist indeed.   As an Englishman, I confess to actually disliking the music of Dowland; = not made any more bearable when incorporated into the "Pavana lachrymae" = by Sweelinck. I was soon nodding off.....   I awoke with a start when a fight broke out in church!   I feel sure that this epic battle would have sounded spectacular on a = Spanish Organ, but the reeds at Haarlem (quite "anglican" and smooth in = tone) lacked a certain cutting edge. Written by Mr Anon whilst visiting = Spain, the "Bathala on the 6th tone" was a protracted affair in which no = clear winner emerged. Quite clearly, this piece would have been more = effective using the Spanish reeds at St.Laurent's, Rotterdam.   Two Sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti (a far cry from the sparkling rhythms = of his harpsichord sonatas) were soporific enough to lull Mark into = sleep. By the end of the second Sonata (K288), his head had found a = comfortable resting place on my shoulder......but this was Holland and = no-one noticed.   Reger is always a challenge and, after Bach, my favourite organ = composer. I was fascinated by the inclusion of the big "Wachet Auf" Chorale = Fantasy. I had certainly heard romantic works played on this organ = previously, but never on this scale. In such pieces, the registration is = a special problem owing to the very unergonomic stop layout, which = stretches sideways from the console in long rows of very large stop = heads. Clearly employing, like Santa Claus, numerous "little helpers", = Bas de Vroome gave a magnificent performance of this difficult work. The = only "error" being a bright Mixtur stop left out at the start of a quiet = passage; the thump, as the stop was whacked in, clearly audible in the = nave!   Even at the age of 13, I adored much of Reger's music, even though it is = quite overpowering at times. The moments of tender lyricism the only = possible foil to the drama and tension going on in the music. But which other composer could use counterpoint and chromaticism to such = brilliant effect? The workings of a complex and tormented mind find = perfect expression in these big organ works, and yet, the quieter = moments are tender and delicate. Even the apparent chaos of fugue = subjects in inversion, stretti or even double stretti find perfect = resolution in the ground-rock of Lutheran Hymnody. By the time "Wachet = Auf" reached the final few lines, the audience were wound up like coiled = springs as multiple big Mixturs with reeds swirled around the building. = Then, the sheer release as those superb Pedal reeds thundered out the = Chorale theme "Wachet Auf!"   For me, a question had been answered.....Reger does indeed work on a = Baroque organ, but you need to have a bath and you need friends!   The recital came to a conclusion with three interesting works by Anton = Heiller with which I was unfamiliar. The first two were Chorale Preludes = based on tunes found in the Danish Gesangbuch. The last piece was a = fine, but very complex (difficult?) sounding Tanz-Toccata. I will = certainly be investigating these further.   Bas de Vroome had done the organ proud and thrilled his audience. In = Holland, they ALWAYS give standing ovations, but when elderly gentlemen = spring to their feet, you know it has been a good one! I certainly sprang to mine, and I think I would regard this as one of = the finest recitals I have ever heard.   Of course, the organ helped!   Once gain, it was time to wrench myself away from this special = place.....but that is how it should be; a "special place" of pilgrimage = rather than just across the street.   We wandered out into the brilliant sunshine of Haarlem, towards the Town = Square and ordinary life once again. Alkmaar beckoned a couple of days = later, but for now, the sight of "Bier" was a welcome one.     (In part 2.... crabs, mean tone, carillons and dancing in the street)      
(back) Subject: RE: A dash of Dutch (Part One - LONG) From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 11:39:57 -0400   Sounds wonderful. Last time I was in Haarlem someone drove up on a bike handed me a small tin and just continued leisurely on his way. The tiny = tin contained Hashish!!! How weird the whole situation was. End of story. RBC   -----Original Message----- From: cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk [mailto:cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk] Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:22 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: RE: A dash of Dutch (Part One - LONG)           Hello,   Leading something of a high-speed life, it is good to slow things down and travel by sea. There is something quite civilized about a leasurely pace, Dinner on board and a good night's sleep before disembarking in Holland = the next morning.   The approach to Holland and the vast Rotterdam Europort (the largest port = in the world) is as fascinating as it is grotesque; a mass of cranes and twisted pipework hauling into view, with huge ocean going vessels loading and un-loading cargo from all four corners of the globe. It would be impossible to calculate, but I suspect that the combined length of all the oil pipes in Rotterdam would comfortably exceed the combined length of = every organ pipe in Holland placed end-to-end.   The centre of Rotterdam is scarcely less alarming....a modern city of concrete and coloured glass, re-built from the flattened remains of a once historic city. It was time to locate a rental car, which took longer than anticipated and rather knocked on the head any prospect of attending a celebrity concert at St Laurent's, Alkmaar that same evening.   "We'll have to go up to Amsterdam and sample the night-life", I suggested.   Mark's eyes lit up and we collected our little car from Hertz.   Mark is a confirmed Disco Bunny, and he was in his element as we partied 'til late amongst the sleaze of Amsterdam; his legs eventually giving out = at 3am. Wobbling his way back to the car and complaining loudly, it was = indeed fortunate that a conveniently parked house-boat prevented a head-long = plunge into a canal; the occupants less than pleased as he lay on his back on = the deck giggling.   The next morning was another day and a chance to search out the REAL Holland; the friendly people with a ready smile and the architectural gems which abound in this otherwise featureless land.   Haarlem is a unique experience, even by Nederlands standards.......a very beautiful place with a fine town square in which locals and tourists = gather to eat, drink, sightsee or chat. It is also the home of the magnificent Frans Hals Museum, which we decided to visit first. Eventually = overwhelmed by an abundance of Old Master Paintings, it was time to leave for the = 15.00 hrs Orgel Konzert at the Grotekerk of St.Baavo, but not before we stumbled almost into a small cabinet organ. A quick investigation revealed that the organ did indeed play, was made by the son of Christian Muller, Pieter Muller in 1772 and was made for the orphanage in Haarlem. The fact that it had an alactric blower attached and a plug in the wall suggested that it = was in good playing condition.   The Grotekerk dominates the town.....a large church by any standards. The approach is through a tiny entrance on the South side. I never fail to obtain delight in taking people into St.Baavo who do not know what to expect. By devilish and cunning means, I always divert their attention by drawing attention to the small organ opposite the entrance or pointing out the rather plain sanctuary and clear glass. The trick is then to spin them around to look down the nave to the organ case. The response is ALWAYS utterly spontaneous......   I was not in the least bit surprised when Mark's jaw dropped wide open. = His verbal reaction was less predictable, consisting of two short words; one with four letters and the other with two! I glanced around nervously in case anyone had overheard and then got a small fit of the giggles!   An almost miraculous sequence of events then followed. No sooner had Mark said, "I'd love to hear that Toccata thingy played on this organ", than = the 3pm bell rang and, with brilliant sonority, an octave double mordent on "a" pealed forth from the organ....trust the Dutch to be on time!   As I glanced around to watch the reaction of tourists with children in = tow, I knew then why it was that BWV565 enjoyed universal popularity. The first flourish caused a ripple of excitement which lit up faces, and when that massive bottom "d" rumbled sonorously, complete with 32ft reed, small children were held spell-bound and normally disinterested youth stopped in its tracks with mouths agape, like rabbits caught in the glare of headlights.   I knew in an instant that the organ had a future; especially in Holland!   A fair canter of a Fugue followed, which surprised me.....most Dutch organists erring on the side of slow and deliberate. Nevertheless, in = spite of the reverberation (about 6 seconds), I never lost track of the counterpoint (or lack of it!).......you cannot beat a vertical disposition and an organ little more than 12ft deep against a wall.   The organist was Bas de Vroome, who plays the organs of the Niuewe and Oudekerks in Delft. A winner of multiple organ playing prizes at major = organ festivals and now a tutor at the Rotterdam Conservatorium, we were clearly in the hands of a very, very fine organist indeed.   As an Englishman, I confess to actually disliking the music of Dowland; = not made any more bearable when incorporated into the "Pavana lachrymae" by Sweelinck. I was soon nodding off.....   I awoke with a start when a fight broke out in church!   I feel sure that this epic battle would have sounded spectacular on a Spanish Organ, but the reeds at Haarlem (quite "anglican" and smooth in tone) lacked a certain cutting edge. Written by Mr Anon whilst visiting Spain, the "Bathala on the 6th tone" was a protracted affair in which no clear winner emerged. Quite clearly, this piece would have been more effective using the Spanish reeds at St.Laurent's, Rotterdam.   Two Sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti (a far cry from the sparkling rhythms of his harpsichord sonatas) were soporific enough to lull Mark into sleep. By the end of the second Sonata (K288), his head had found a comfortable resting place on my shoulder......but this was Holland and no-one noticed.   Reger is always a challenge and, after Bach, my favourite organ composer. I was fascinated by the inclusion of the big "Wachet Auf" Chorale Fantasy. = I had certainly heard romantic works played on this organ previously, but never on this scale. In such pieces, the registration is a special problem owing to the very unergonomic stop layout, which stretches sideways from = the console in long rows of very large stop heads. Clearly employing, like = Santa Claus, numerous "little helpers", Bas de Vroome gave a magnificent performance of this difficult work. The only "error" being a bright Mixtur stop left out at the start of a quiet passage; the thump, as the stop was whacked in, clearly audible in the nave!   Even at the age of 13, I adored much of Reger's music, even though it is quite overpowering at times. The moments of tender lyricism the only possible foil to the drama and tension going on in the music. But which other composer could use counterpoint and chromaticism to such brilliant effect? The workings of a complex and tormented mind find = perfect expression in these big organ works, and yet, the quieter moments are = tender and delicate. Even the apparent chaos of fugue subjects in inversion, stretti or even double stretti find perfect resolution in the ground-rock = of Lutheran Hymnody. By the time "Wachet Auf" reached the final few lines, = the audience were wound up like coiled springs as multiple big Mixturs with reeds swirled around the building. Then, the sheer release as those superb Pedal reeds thundered out the Chorale theme "Wachet Auf!"   For me, a question had been answered.....Reger does indeed work on a = Baroque organ, but you need to have a bath and you need friends!   The recital came to a conclusion with three interesting works by Anton Heiller with which I was unfamiliar. The first two were Chorale Preludes based on tunes found in the Danish Gesangbuch. The last piece was a fine, but very complex (difficult?) sounding Tanz-Toccata. I will certainly be investigating these further.   Bas de Vroome had done the organ proud and thrilled his audience. In Holland, they ALWAYS give standing ovations, but when elderly gentlemen spring to their feet, you know it has been a good one! I certainly sprang to mine, and I think I would regard this as one of the finest recitals I have ever heard.   Of course, the organ helped!   Once gain, it was time to wrench myself away from this special = place.....but that is how it should be; a "special place" of pilgrimage rather than just across the street.   We wandered out into the brilliant sunshine of Haarlem, towards the Town Square and ordinary life once again. Alkmaar beckoned a couple of days later, but for now, the sight of "Bier" was a welcome one.     (In part 2.... crabs, mean tone, carillons and dancing in the street)       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Tom's River Methodist Church From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 11:42:00 -0400   Hello, all, just returned from a nice long weekend on the Jersey Shore. I attended Neil Brown's service on Sunday which he posted on PipeChat. He = is one GOOD organist. His comments on "Rock of Ages" were interesting, I picked up on his stop changes per verse, especially the unison eights on the third verse, but not in relation to the text. Had not heard him play before and thought he just does this all the time! What I did appreciate was his modulations between several verses of Diadem, where he raised the key two different times! It actually ended on the hymnal key which was A. =   And his Postlude Improvisation on that hymn was great. A 1995 2 manual Schantz. The other unrelated thing I appreciated was that there were a dozen youth participating in the service, doing the greeting, unison and responsive readings, scriptures, and offering. One of the other special things we did, besides visiting 4 lighthouses, climbing into and on top of Lucy the Margate Elephant, and attending a Glenn Miller Orchestra concert, was to hear Gordon Turk give a recital on the large 5 manual Hope-Jones at the Ocean Grove Auditorium. The tuba = blew me away! He used it on an Oliphant Chuckerbutty piece, and told me afterwards it is on 25 inches of wind pressure. He played Bach's Toccata in F and three movements from the Widor Fifth Symphony, first, fourth and fifth (Toccata) which he ended with all four = 32 foot pedal ranks on, Bourdon, Trombone, Bombarde, and Diaphone. The floor was rumbling! He was playing a quiet Edward MacDowell "Sea" piece when = the very loud fire station alarm went off nearby. He quickly changed registration and began improvising to cover the racket for a few minutes, and then went back to the quiet piece, so that, if he had not announced what he did, afterwards, many would not have guessed! Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: re 94th psalm rebuke From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 08:48:20 -0700 (PDT)   Has anyone noticed--or did I miss the post--that "rebuke" is an anagram for "Reubke?"   JH  
(back) Subject: Hammonds off-limits? naw ... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 09:07:08 -0700   Pipe, electronic, reed and "other" (???) organs can be discussed here .... David just requested that we cool the "my widget can beat up your Waldfloete" wars.   Somebody was asking about Hammond REGISTRATION ... here's the complete list of the reverse-color presets at the bass end of the manuals, and also what the actual settings are in drawbar numbers, in case you might want to set them on the drawbars too .. if you needed the Dulciana on the GREAT, for instance.   These settings can be changed, by the way, but it involves moving wires around on a little peg-board in the back of the console, and it's a REAL pain (grin).   I usually leave them approximately the same TONE-COLOR so that I can still use the suggested "Hammond Registration" on organ music, but tinker with them to make them SOUND a little bit better ... and I ALWAYS take the heavy 16' and 5 1/3' off Swell "A" and Great "A".   There's also a brightness control in the back of the console ... turning that up or down (depending on the room) can also improve the sound.   The pitches of the drawbars, left to right (all "pure" flute tone, by the way):   Brown - 16 Brown - 5 1/3   White - 8 White - 4 Black - 2 2/3 White - 2   Black - 1 3/5 Black - 1 1/3 White - 1       A few late models (H, and maybe A) had two additional black drawbars to the right of the 1' (on the Great only? I'm working from memory here): 1 1/7 (Septieme) and 8/9 (None). They were VERY useful for making better string and reed combinations, but they only appeared on those models, and they weren't around long enough to make it into most of the registration guides, so most folks didn't know what to DO with them (grin).       SWELL   C..........00 0000 000.....Cancel.................ppppppppppppppppppp C#.........00 5320 000.....Stopped Flute..........pp D..........00 4432 000.....Dulciana...............ppp D#.........00 8740 000.....French Horn............mf E..........00 4544 222......Salicional............pp F..........00 5403 000......Flutes 8 & 4..........p F#.........00 4675 300......Oboe Horn.............mf G..........00 5644 320......Swell Diapason........mf G#.........00 6876 540.......Trumpet..............f A..........32 7645 222.......Full Swell...........ff A#.........Adjust harmonic drawbars in 1st Group, Upper Manual - extreme left group B..........Adjust harmonic drawbars in 2nd Group, Upper Manual - near left group       GREAT   C........00 0000 000.....Cancel....................pppppppppppppppppppp C#.......00 4545 440.....Cello.....................mp D........00 4423 220.....Flute & String............mp D#.......00 7373 430.....Clarinet..................mf E........00 4544 220.....Diapason, Gamba & Flute...mf F........00 6644 322.....Great, no reeds...........f F#.......00 5642 200.....Open Diapason.............f G........00 6845 433.....Full Great................ff G#.......00 8030 000.....Tibia Clausa..............f A........42 7866 244.....Full Great with 16........fff A#.......Adjust harmonic drawbars in 1st Group, Lower Manual - near right group B........Adjust harmonic drawbars in 2nd Group, Lower Manual - extreme right group       Most of them are serviceable, except for that Great C# Cello ... it's UGLY (grin) ... I usually change that to a Bassoon to give another solo stop.   Here are a few useful additional combinations, some slightly different from the presets:   Clarinet: 00-8060-400 Horn Diapason: 00-8765-432 - good for chant accompaniment Oboe: 00-2787-200 Quintadena: 00-8020-000 Trumpet: 00-8888-800   And, for the benefit of the younger generation, HOW TO START A HAMMOND ORGAN (grin):   Press the "START" toggle forward and count to 10; WHILE HOLDING THE "START" TOGGLE, press the "RUN" toggle forward and count to five, or until you hear the whir of the tonewheels reach a steady speed. Then RELEASE the "START" toggle (it'll snap back) and you're ready to play. To turn the organ OFF, simply pull the "RUN" toggle toward you.   Newer Hammonds have a single off/on switch.   The second step may take longer on older organs, and/ or if the organ hasn't been OILED recently ... Hammonds require oiling once a year, but use ONLY the special Hammond oil (still available ... go to the HamTech list), NOT 3-in-1 or motor oil or anything ELSE ... it'll gum up the works.   Other than that, tubes go out occasionally; vibrato scanners need replaced once in awhile (they're still available too) ... you'll know when THAT'S necessary by the "motorboat" sound the vibrato will make when it's turned on.   V-1 or VC-1 (on newer models) is tolerable for a "church" tremulant. V-3 is your rockin' git down Gospel vibrato.   Older models also have a true celeste or chorus control ... it's a single drawbar on the upper right (I think it was) ABOVE the row of regular drawbars.   The Pedal drawbars are the two in the middle, between the four sets of nine drawbars. The left-hand one is the 16'; the right-hand one is the 8' ... that's all folks, unless you have a Concert Model with the Pedal Solo Unit in the right-hand Great key-cheek ... but those are often inoperable on older Concert Models. Some techs will repair them; some refuse to be bothered (grin). They're basically the same technology as the older Solovox, so they're hard to tune to the tonewheels.   Most of the above applies equally to the two classic Hammond models: C-3 (Church Model, with the "modesty panels" around the bottom of the organ) and the B-3 (Home Model, with the four-poster open bottom) ... they're the same organ in two different cabinet styles. The Concert Model (RT-2, RT-3) had a slightly larger console, 32 pedals (the C-3 and B-3 have 25, C to C), and the Pedal Solo Unit, but the rest of the controls are the same.   The real TREASURE, possession of which confers "HamGod" status on the owner, is the very early Model E -- AGO pedal-board, TWO expression pedals, typewriter keys instead of reverse-color presents, and (I THINK) a Great to Pedal coupler. Our fearless leader is the proud owner of one.   Hammond tone cabinets are best burnt (grin) ... they're 1940s hi-fi technology, and were never updated ... but a good Leslie (or two) will do WONDERS for the sound of ANY Hammond. The earlier tube ones are warmer-sounding that the later solid-state ones (in my opinion anyway).   More than you EVER wanted to know about Hammonds (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Drawknob layout From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 16:31:03 +0000   Our organ in the Evangelical Church has one terrace - stops arranged in families, Pedal on the left, Great in the middle and Swell on the right. It's quite comfortable - no registration aids whatsoever! You can see it = on my photo page JOHN FOSS ORGANS - go to my home page http://www.geocities.com/harfo32/JohnFossathome.html click on GALLERY and it's the first of the JOHN FOSS folders. Incidentally =   does anyone know how to change the names of folders on Yahoo photo albums? = I want to call it "ORGANS" and delete one of the other folders, but there = are no instructions on the page and YAHOO never replies to my requests! John Foss       _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: Wind pressure From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 12:34:53 -0400   How is wind pressure controlled in an organ? I mean I read such things as = 4" pressure and 2" pressure and 25" pressure. How do you establish and = maintain a particular pressure in a pipe organ? Is it the blower that does this or = is the something in the chest and or reservoir that does this?--RBC the inquisitive ignorant one. (And don't confuse that with stupid!)      
(back) Subject: Re: re 94th psalm rebuke From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2002 13:20:49 -0400   Dear <DMA Ranger Son> *   Didn't you learn nothin' at school? Generations of Organ students have called the piece the Rebuke, and you can sure they were aware of its anagramatical connection at all times.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler <Damn Groaners> *   *Anagrams!         ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:48 AM Subject: re 94th psalm rebuke     > Has anyone noticed--or did I miss the post--that "rebuke" is an anagram > for "Reubke?" > > JH >