PipeChat Digest #3074 - Monday, August 19, 2002
 
Re: OFF-TOPIC -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Air Conditioning Inventor OFF TOPIC!
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Today's prelude...
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Announcing Hymns
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: Announcing Hymns
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Gold Pipes (HELP)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Gold Pipes and anything different
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
RE: Announcing Hymns
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
RE: Gold Pipes (HELP)
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
San Francisco
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: Air Conditioning Inventor OFF TOPIC!
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Announcing Hymns
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:03:30 -0500   On 8/19/02 11:02 AM, John Vanderlee wrote:   > My wife is a music teacher in public school and organist as well(for > topicality's sake!). They found that with a all those holidays > falling on monday there was a disproportionate number of monday class > sessions missing from the 5 day schedule. So they changed to a six > day schedule!! that is instead of Mon - Fri, is is now Day A through > F. try that one on for size... The teachers AND kids are going nuts > trying to remember what day it is....   In Manitoba, we've been on a six-day cycle since the early 60's - chaos early on but works fine at this point.   But we too have been having the Labor Day war. Until a few years ago, kids returned to school the day after Labor Day, period. We have a 200 day = school year; the last day of school is June 30th (or the last weekday in June).   Then the teachers pressured school boards into an early start to the = school year, just a few days prior to Labor Day. Why? So that the teachers could get a two-week holiday at Christmas!   There's been so much controversy about the early start that the Premier of the Province (like a U.S. Governor) is now fully in the fray. He's going = to return the start of school to the day after Labor Day. But the teachers = get to keep their two-week holiday at Christmas. How can he accomplish this? Simple, he's just going to shorten the school year by a few days. It's apparently politically more desirable to worsen kids' education than to = take back some of the Christmas break.   Go figure, Russ    
(back) Subject: Air Conditioning Inventor OFF TOPIC! From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:41:29 -0500   Since we prefer to play our pipe organs in comfortable spaces, air conditioning can be a blessing indeed!   As to the inventor--   John Gorrie (Gorey?) of Apalachicola, Florida is credited by many with inventing air conditioning during the Civil War. At a steaming hospital, = he placed blocks of ice in front of some sort of large fan, producing cool = air.   Carrier is also claimed as the inventor; I imagine it was he who invented a/c by means of a compressor and refrigerant, presumably at a later day.   Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God."    
(back) Subject: Re: Today's prelude... From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:49:41 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01C2476E.1F584B50 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   The Carrier company is owned by United Technologies, (former employer of = =3D mine) who also own Otis Elevator, Sikorsky, Pratt & Whitney, and others.   ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Douglas A. Campbell=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2002 11:36 PM Subject: Re: Today's prelude...     Bruce,   local legend can go to................. Willis Carrier ( from =3D Syracuse, NY) is widely accepted as having invented Air Conditioning. =3D (And the company still bears his name).     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY =3D20   On Sun, 18 Aug 2002 23:20:31 EDT Cremona502@cs.com writes: In a message dated 8/18/02 9:43:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time, =3D patmai@juno.com writes:=3D20       Cheers to all (let's hear it for the folks who invented=3D20 air-conditioning!) =3D20     According to local legend that would be John Gorey, for whom a =3D Jacksonville High School was named. The irony is that this school was = =3D the last one in the city to be air-conditioned. If you desire to =3D refute this, go ahead. I'm not emotionally attached to it... just =3D passing it along! ;-)=3D20   Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres =3D http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502=3D20 ...an opportunity for health & wealth =3D http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053=3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01C2476E.1F584B50 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>The Carrier company is owned by = United=3D20 Technologies, (former employer of mine) who also own Otis Elevator, =3D Sikorsky,=3D20 Pratt &amp; Whitney, and others.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3Ddougcampbell@juno.com =3D href=3D3D"mailto:dougcampbell@juno.com">Douglas A.=3D20 Campbell</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Sunday, August 18, 2002 = =3D 11:36=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: Today's =3D prelude...</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV> <DIV>Bruce,</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>local legend can go to.................&nbsp;Willis Carrier ( =3D from=3D20 Syracuse, NY)&nbsp;is widely accepted as having invented Air =3D Conditioning.=3D20 (And the company still bears his name).</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><BR>Douglas A. Campbell<BR>Skaneateles, NY<BR>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>On Sun, 18 Aug 2002 23:20:31 EDT <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</A> writes:</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 10px; MARGIN-LEFT: 10px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 = =3D 2px solid"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>In a message = dated =3D 8/18/02=3D20 9:43:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time, patmai@juno.com writes: =3D <BR><BR><BR></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff = =3D 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"=3D20 TYPE=3D3D"CITE">Cheers to all (let's hear it for the folks who =3D invented=3D20 <BR>air-conditioning!) =3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT><FONT=3D20 lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D3=3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D3D0 =3D face=3D3DArial=3D20 color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>According to = local =3D legend that=3D20 would be John Gorey, for whom a Jacksonville High School was = named.=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;The irony is that this school was the last one in the =3D city to be=3D20 air-conditioned. &nbsp;&nbsp;If you desire to refute this, go ahead. = =3D   &nbsp;I'm not emotionally attached to it... just passing it along! =3D &nbsp;;-)=3D20 <BR><BR>Bruce in the Muttastery at Howling Acres=3D20 http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 <BR>...an opportunity for health = =3D &amp;=3D20 wealth &nbsp;http://visionsuccess.com/BC2053</FONT> </FONT> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0031_01C2476E.1F584B50--    
(back) Subject: Announcing Hymns From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:56:45 -0500   In my casual to middle of the road Protestant experience, I find that = hymns are announced more often than not and the presence of a "song leader" is = not uncommon.   Regarding Steven's experience, those folk must be the same ones who are always in front of me at the grocery store and seem surprised that they = have to pay! The cashier announces the total and suddenly they are fumbling = for purses, wallets, checkbooks, as if it were a total surprise!   Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God." ********************************** Our church has not announced hymn for 75 years, and yet I observed while sitting in the congregation (during several weeks of vacation) that long-time members will sit there, stand during the introduction of the hymn, then, = as if surprised, fumble for the bulletin and hymnal as the beginning of the hymn starts. I'd think everyone would be looking forward and planning on how to maximize the participatory elements!     Steven Skinner Minister of Music    
(back) Subject: RE: Announcing Hymns From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 11:06:12 -0500   I thought those people were only at my store....   Peter   Regarding Steven's experience, those folk must be the same ones who are always in front of me at the grocery store and seem surprised that they = have to pay! The cashier announces the total and suddenly they are fumbling = for purses, wallets, checkbooks, as if it were a total surprise!   Dennis Steckley  
(back) Subject: Re: Gold Pipes (HELP) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 13:19:54 EDT   Dear Daniel:   Probably the best advice is to ignore these people and the concerns will diminish in a very short time. People who would suggest such a thing generally have too much time on their hands as it is. Most of this type of concern usually resides with people who like to meddle into just about everything. It will drive one crazy trying to placate them, so just be polite and ignore them. There is a certain element of every = congregation who indulge in this kind of behavior. They wish to put their stamp on everything, but first and foremost worship is secondary, and socialization is primary. It becomes and association or a club to them. It makes them feel like "Good People." They give luke warm lip service and that's the extent of their total devotion.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Gold Pipes and anything different From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 13:20:13 -0500     RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Dear Daniel: > Probably the best advice is to ignore these people and the concerns > will diminish in a very short time. People who would suggest such a = thing > generally have too much time on their hands as it is. Most of this type > of concern usually resides with people who like to meddle into just > about everything. It will drive one crazy trying to placate them, so = just > be polite and ignore them. There is a certain element of every = congregation. . .   Back in 1986, as part of an organ renovation project to a 1905 Hinners, we decided to re-create, to the best of our abilities, the stencil designs of the facade pipes.   This was in STARK contrast to the "whitewashed appearance these pipes had for years, except for the Gold painted upper and lower lips.   The instrument is adjacent to the Altar area, since this is an Akron-plan Sanctuary.   When the facade pipes first went back in, the Minister at the time raised an incredible fuss over the whole thing, thinking that "we were taking away from God by drawing attention to the organ instead of the Altar.   This criticism was short-lived, as was the tenure of the Minister, who was transferred by the Bishop a short time later.   No one ever complained about it again.   But like anything else, when something is "new", it always demands and receives attention. Think about when you've bought a new car. For a few days, you'll go look at it sitting in the driveway, but then, you "get over it" and it starts assimilating its way into your life and you don't keep looking at it anymore.   Same goes for a new organ or one with a different appearance. Once people get used to it, the complains usually cease. If they don't, then that person usually DOES have too much time on their hands or there is some other hidden agenda.   Faithfully,   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: RE: Announcing Hymns From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 14:33:57 -0400   >Lots of large churches in Europe and America have hymnboards up front. = And in a big church, they can be unreadable from farther west. But lots of = such churches have another paid of hymnboards halfway back, or so-or even a = third set! Nuisance for the janitor, sacristan, or whoever, but, c'est la vie! =     They are labor-intensive but, then, so is the preparation of bulletins, = and hymn boards are environmentally benign. I am not quite comfortable with = the paper consumption of bulletins, especially when they are not leaflets but entire booklets that, for the most part, contain the same texts week after week. Churches should at least give them up for Lent. At one interim position I was responsible for setting up the hymn boards myself, but was able to delegate it to young choristers who enjoyed the job.   >I think that Roman Catholic liturgical theologians would agree = unanimously that "announcing the hymn numbers, or page numbers for whatever" is a practice to be avoided. If possible.   Where do they live? The hymns are announced by the song leader at every = RC parish I recall attending. As you said, the weekly bulletins have nothing to do with the present liturgy; they are announcements (yes, with advertising) that people grab on the way OUT.   >a couple of Lutheran churches in Brooklyn were experimenting with = producing bulletins with hymn numbers, etc.--and they were harshly condemned by = other Lutherans, because such things were regarded as "popery."   Some Lutherans would suffocate themselves to death if they discovered that Catholics breathe.   >Across the board, who produces the finest bulletins? The Episcopalians, = of course. No competition.   I know of a parish whose Sunday bulletin booklets are almost works of art every week. It isn't a large parish, but they have a full-time "communications officer" who prepares them (among many other tasks that he carries out with great dedication.) It is reputedly a rapidly growing congregation. I suppose that copious bulletins do their part in making a visitor feel at home quickly. But-- oh-- the poor trees!   Speaking of announcing hymns and making visitors feel at home, one rector was opposed to abbreviated play-overs of hymns on the organ. He wanted = the entire tune played through on the grounds that this was friendlier to visitors and newcomers. Expert church musicians have explained, of = course, that the purposes of the playover are to set (1) the key, (2) the tempo, = and (3) the mood, none of which requires playing the whole melody. Yet I am willing to believe that this clergyman's argument has merit. Since then I have usually given complete play-overs, except perhaps for a familiar last hymn: if the service has run long or the building has become stuffy, I = sense that everyone just wants out and will appreciate getting the play-over = done with.      
(back) Subject: RE: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 13:49:23 -0500   > Colin Mitchell wrote: > Rick makes a perfectly feasible case for "experience" and "tonal = finishing" on site....of course, he is absolutely right. However, the fact = that some noted organ builders have resorted to firing cannon in large = churches and using pink/white noise and "expert" acousticians suggests to = me that they, at best, had self-doubts. > > <snip> > > My Brother checked his instruments and realised that he had calibrated = them incorrectly and the old boy with the red face was absolutely right. > > So what does this tell us? > > <snip> > > I think I know what white noise is, but pink noise? Sounds interesting! = I think I once heard some when they televised the Sydney Mardi Gras!! >   Well I would expect a professional to keep his equipment properly = calibrated. I do believe the idea of analyzing the room response is = valuable and in time to could lead to greater consistency of pipe scaling = and voicing. FYI, the process of analyzing the reverberation of a room is = called impulse response analysis.   As for pink noise, it's a close relative of white noise. White noise is = defined as equal amplitude at all frequencies. This tends to skew it's = sound toward the high end and it sounds like hiss. Pink noise is weighted = 6 dB per octave with amplitude decreasing at that rate as frequency rises. = Pink noise sounds more like ocean waves except it's continuous.   > Sebastian Gluck wrote: > > Successful pipe organs have been scaled, voiced, and finished for = centuries > without laboratories, oscilloscopes, purple noise, or canon. >   Sebastian I value your expertise on this list and realize that ultimately = voicing is an art. So I would agree with you that the highest quality work = depends on years of expertise that no technology can supplant. But all = arts have some basis in science. By measuring what works in successful = rooms builders can learn from experts past and present. I daresay perhaps = even you might benefit from detailed analysis of your best work vs. your = less successful installations. Even if you were to develop a model for voicing based on impulse responses that doesn't mean you have to it = public. It can be yet another secret ingredient that differentiates you = from the crowd. For all I know you're doing it now.   Steve Chandler    
(back) Subject: RE: Gold Pipes (HELP) From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:57:35 +0100   Hello,   Easy peasy!   Just tell them that "all that glisters is not gold" .....it is a way of = making inferior material look expensive.   Tell them that the shiny spotted-metal pipes are really pure planished = hallmarked silver!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK        
(back) Subject: RE: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 20:00:56 +0100   Hello,   Sebastian is absolutely right.....and so am I. Unsuccesful organs have = been scaled, voiced and finished for centuries without laboratories, = oscilloscopes, purple noise or canon(?)   Where do we go from here?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK        
(back) Subject: San Francisco From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 15:02:18 -0400   (forwarding in inquiry from Robert Colasacco)   Hi,   Is anyone here in San Francisco? Can you tell me if you know of any organ recitals being offered between Wed. 8/21 and Mon 8/26? I will be is the city those days. I depart early morning 8.27. Also any organs one can = visit and actually see upon entering the church. I've been to Grace Cathedral only in all the many trips I've made there before. Never heard the big instrument just saw the pipes.   Anyway, I've already received a few suggestions from one person on the list but any and all recommendations are welcome.   Thank you, RBC    
(back) Subject: Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 15:06:34 -0500   Dear list,   I say, lets go back to the beginning when pipe organs were real organs. Lets begin with throwing out anything that is electric on a pipe organ, except of course the blower and the music desk light, (candles are definitely a fire hazard). A true pipe organ has key tracker action and mechanical stop key action. We all just finished reading the excellent article by Colin Mitchell about his trip to Holland and listening to the magnificent organs in Haarlem and Alkmaar. What Colin heard is to a very large extend due to the mechanical stop actions coupled with mechanical key action. This gives the organist = control over the attack of the pipes as air enters the pipe column. Most pipe organs that we are familiar with in North America are really electric instruments, meaning that the actions are nothing more than switches turning on or off, (electric in other words). Couple this with pipes buried in chambers and you have now created a sound that for = arguments sake is still pipe like, but lacks anything that real pipe organs possess, namely individual pipe attack for each stop/rank which is essential for proper speech characteristics of each pipe. This is what Colin was listening to and he so much fell in love with. We are all so quick to condemn the digital organ of today, but the reality of it is, is that the digital that has properly sampled ranks and is installed in an acoustically friendly environment and voiced accordingly = is often superior to the (electric) pipe organ one finds in most of our churches. I know that a lot of you will disagree with me, thinking that their church pipe organ is the greatest thing, but if you have the time and money, do what Colin did. You may think different about your church organ after you come back. Have a great trip, and, please do let us know your thoughts.   Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, August 19, 2002 2:00 PM Subject: RE: Definitely NOT electronic organs!     Hello,   Sebastian is absolutely right.....and so am I. Unsuccesful organs have = been scaled, voiced and finished for centuries without laboratories, oscilloscopes, purple noise or canon(?)   Where do we go from here?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Air Conditioning Inventor OFF TOPIC! From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 15:25:51 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, August 19, 2002 10:41 AM Subject: Air Conditioning Inventor OFF TOPIC!   > As to the inventor-- > > John Gorrie (Gorey?) of Apalachicola, Florida is credited by many with > inventing air conditioning during the Civil War. At a steaming = hospital, he > placed blocks of ice in front of some sort of large fan, producing cool air.   We still use his equivalent measurements (Ice Melting Equivalent) , such = as a "2 ton Air conditioner" which is actually 24,000 btu's. 2 ton of ice melting in a 24 hour period produces this much cooling.   >    
(back) Subject: Re: Announcing Hymns From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 16:52:24 -0400   On 8/19/02 2:33 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   >> Lots of large churches in Europe and America have hymnboards up front. = And >> in a big church, they can be unreadable from farther west. But lots of = such >> churches have another paid of hymnboards halfway back, or so-or even a = third >> set! Nuisance for the janitor, sacristan, or whoever, but, c'est la = vie! > > They are labor-intensive but, then, so is the preparation of bulletins, = and > hymn boards are environmentally benign. I am not quite comfortable with = the > paper consumption of bulletins, especially when they are not leaflets = but > entire booklets that, for the most part, contain the same texts week = after > week. Churches should at least give them up for Lent. At one interim > position I was responsible for setting up the hymn boards myself, but = was > able to delegate it to young choristers who enjoyed the job. > >> I think that Roman Catholic liturgical theologians would agree = unanimously >> that "announcing the hymn numbers, or page numbers for whatever" is a >> practice to be avoided. If possible. > > Where do they live? The hymns are announced by the song leader at every = RC > parish I recall attending.   Readily believable, Paul--and it explains why there's a felt need to = protest against the practice. If nobody did it, there would be no protest against it.   I'm looking at HOW NOT TO SAY MASS by Dennis C. Smolarski (Paulist Press), where I thought I'd find this--but so far, no luck. I recommend also Fr. Robert Hovda's STRONG, LOVING, AND WISE (Liturgical Press); as well as = Aidan Kavanagh, PRINCIPLES OF RITE (Pueblo); David Power, UNSEARCHABLE RICHES (Pueblo); Eugene Walsh, PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR CELEBRATING SUNDAY MASS (Pastoral Arts Associates of North America). Having just entered my 71st year, I've been giving away most of my books, so don't even know where to LOOK for things any more.   > As you said, the weekly bulletins have nothing to do with the present > liturgy; they are announcements (yes, with advertising) > that people grab on the way OUT.   AH!! That changes the whole thing. Neither being right or wrong; it's = just a different idea. Our bulletins are one legal-size sheet each, folded, printed on both sides. 2+ pages for the liturgy (listing the parts, = titles of organ voluntaries, title and maybe text of anthems, hymn numbers (with name, tune-name) , etc.; 2- pages for announcements, music notes, maybe something devotional, schedule for the coming week (or so); upcoming = events. And names of assisting ministers, address, phone number, e-mail, webpage, etc. I'm VERY with you on not killing trees to to fill up Sunday pews = with trash! Our bulletin DOES include a smaller cheap recycled-paper insert = with Prayer of the Day, pointed text of the Psalmody (from which the = congregation and cantor sing); texts of three lessons, texts of the Intercessions for = the Day (at least most of them). > >> a couple of Lutheran churches in Brooklyn were experimenting with = producing >> bulletins with hymn numbers, etc.--and they were harshly condemned by = other >> Lutherans, because such things were regarded as "popery." > > Some Lutherans would suffocate themselves to death if they discovered = that > Catholics breathe.   Ain't THAT the truth!!! > >> Across the board, who produces the finest bulletins? The = Episcopalians, of >> course. No competition. > > I know of a parish whose Sunday bulletin booklets are almost works of = art > every week. It isn't a large parish, but they have > a full-time "communications officer" who prepares them (among many other > tasks that he carries out with great dedication.) > It is reputedly a rapidly growing congregation. I suppose that copious > bulletins do their part in making a visitor feel at home quickly. But-- > oh-- the poor trees! > > Speaking of announcing hymns and making visitors feel at home, one = rector > was opposed to abbreviated play-overs of hymns on the organ. He wanted = the > entire tune played through on the grounds that this was friendlier to > visitors and newcomers. Expert church musicians have explained, of = course, > that the purposes of the playover are to set (1) the key, (2) the tempo, = and > (3) the mood, none of which requires playing the whole melody. Yet I am > willing to believe that this clergyman's argument has merit. Since then = I > have usually given complete play-overs, except perhaps for a familiar = last > hymn: if the service has run long or the building has become stuffy, I = sense > that everyone just wants out and will appreciate getting the play-over = done > with.   We generally do a full play-through--and certainly if the hymn is less = than quite familiar. At least a third of the time, and especially if the = cantus firmus is familiar, the play-through will be a brief but full chorale prelude. (People enjoy that: they follow the cantus firmus, and stand in unison on the final phrase.) But (as you say) if it's hot, and we're running late, and the hymn is quite familiar, we'll chop it down to = minimal. Just enough to let people find the right page. > I'll see if I can't find the kind of quotes I started out to look for.   Thanks!   Alan