PipeChat Digest #3075 - Monday, August 19, 2002
 
Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
More on John Gorrie
  by "Stanley B. Littleton" <slittles@mail.earthlink.net>
Hymn Intros--Be creative
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Intros--Be creative
  by "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3074 - 08/19/02
  by "Carol Scott" <dclscott@skyenet.net>
Re: Hymn Intros--Be creative
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Gold Pipes (HELP)
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3074 - 08/19/02
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
website update:  somewhat off topic
  by "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: Italian organs
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Announcing hymns.
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Today's prelude...
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
 

(back) Subject: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 23:06:43 +0100   Hello,   Gary Deboir made an excellent comment about mechanical action = instruments; especially those I visited recently. However, with all = respect, I think he slightly missed the point of what I was hinting at.   Let's try a different approach....   Let's say I visit Holland and hear Alkmaar. I play in a church in the Uk = which has a poor acoustic; the organ crammed in a chamber and the = resonance virtually nil. I go to an organ builder and say, "I've just = heard the most wonderful organ. Do you think you could make pipes which = sound like Alkmaar and put them in a new organ for my church".   This is excatly what happened back in the 60's, when everyone attempted = to create the Baroque sound with disastrous consequences in many, many = churches West of Holland and across the Atlantic Ocean.   Now, let's say that we have state of the art recording gear, take pipes = out of the organ at Alkmaar, record them under studio conditions and = then digitally create a playing keyboard and state of the art = loudspeakers etc.   In an instant, both organist and organ builder would know that this is = NOT the sort of sound which would be at all suitable.....Alkmaar is the = product of an organ, a master organ builder and a superb acoustic. Take = away the acoustic, and the sound dies.....in fact, Alkmaar would sound = horrendous in the average parish church with a relatively dead acoustic.   If organ builders, and especially organ pipe makers and voicer, had a = midi data base of sounds from around the world, they could have a point = of reference to which they could turn. Lesser organ builders would be in = a position to experiment without incurring expense and would not have to = face terrible criticism when they got it wrong.   I am therefore advocating a type of tonal training which could be of = benefit to rookie organ builders and experts alike..........tonal = direction still remains a "black art" and even the best make mistakes.   Is there a more scientific way....that is my question!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK            
(back) Subject: Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 17:32:10 -0500   Thanks Colin, but my bottom line is basically, if we can not build and install correctly our so much cherished pipe organs, why bother at all ? A fake (digital) would in that case be the better choice.   And, is the point of reference you are proposing from electric pipe organs or mechanical ones ? Tonal direction (Voicing capabilities) begins with a properly built organ that hopefully is placed in good acoustics. Just my thoughts. Thanks.   Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, August 19, 2002 5:06 PM Subject: Definitely NOT electronic organs!     Hello,   Gary Deboir made an excellent comment about mechanical action instruments; especially those I visited recently. However, with all respect, I think he slightly missed the point of what I was hinting at.   Let's try a different approach....   Let's say I visit Holland and hear Alkmaar. I play in a church in the Uk which has a poor acoustic; the organ crammed in a chamber and the = resonance virtually nil. I go to an organ builder and say, "I've just heard the most wonderful organ. Do you think you could make pipes which sound like = Alkmaar and put them in a new organ for my church".   This is excatly what happened back in the 60's, when everyone attempted to create the Baroque sound with disastrous consequences in many, many = churches West of Holland and across the Atlantic Ocean.   Now, let's say that we have state of the art recording gear, take pipes = out of the organ at Alkmaar, record them under studio conditions and then digitally create a playing keyboard and state of the art loudspeakers etc.   In an instant, both organist and organ builder would know that this is NOT the sort of sound which would be at all suitable.....Alkmaar is the = product of an organ, a master organ builder and a superb acoustic. Take away the acoustic, and the sound dies.....in fact, Alkmaar would sound horrendous = in the average parish church with a relatively dead acoustic.   If organ builders, and especially organ pipe makers and voicer, had a midi data base of sounds from around the world, they could have a point of reference to which they could turn. Lesser organ builders would be in a position to experiment without incurring expense and would not have to = face terrible criticism when they got it wrong.   I am therefore advocating a type of tonal training which could be of = benefit to rookie organ builders and experts alike..........tonal direction still remains a "black art" and even the best make mistakes.   Is there a more scientific way....that is my question!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: More on John Gorrie From: "Stanley B. Littleton" <slittles@mail.earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 17:34:03 -0500   Actually, Gorrie invented the first ice making machine and then used the resulting product to help cool maleria fever patients in Apalachicola and nearby St. Joe. Anyone who has visited the Florida Big Bend in August will understand why!   To bring this back to an organ note, Gorrie was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalach (as locals call the town).   Said church is home to 2 organs, one a Henry Erben complete with hitchdown swell and 17 pull down pedals AND a 2 manual Pilcher. I have always maintained that the Pilcher is an electrification of an earlier instrument, but the church records do not support that idea.   I've done several weddings over the years at Trinity and somehow manage to use both instruments <VBG>   A picture is at:   http://www.pensacola-ago.org/organs/trinityapal.html   Didn't David S. have someting to do with this web site?   I have always recommended the Pensacola AGO site to those who think the Florida Panhandle is only pine trees and white sand beaches...   Stan in Marianna, where the 99 degree weather has abated. For two days. It will be back.   -- Stanley Littleton   "God made so many different kinds of people -- why would he allow only one way to serve Him?" ~ Martin Buber      
(back) Subject: Hymn Intros--Be creative From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 18:47:16 EDT     --part1_95.2153a4e6.2a92cf74_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Several people have been talking about "playthroughs" vs. abbreviated = intros for hymns. I was taught that a complete playthrough was only necessary = when introducing a new hymn or a non-familiar hymn, and that for all intensive purposes, a shortened intro was sufficient. As I have gotten older, (I'm = the ripe old age of 32 now!) I have even gotten out of playing the first/last line intro, and have gotten creative, using pieces based on the hymn that will be sung, or playing a fanfare and then doing a segue into the hymn intro. For example, when singing CWM Rhondda, I play opening part of the Manz arrangement and at an appropriate place jump to the last line, which ends with the bold statement of the last couple of measures. When singing =   Nun Danket, I use Virgil's Bach transcription, transposing into whatever = key needed--Eb or F. I have also used the Oliphant Chukerbutty "Paean" = opening fanfare to work into an introduction to Ellacombe. Since I have been a free-lance musician for the past 4 1/2 = years, since leaving Calvary Church, Charlotte, NC, it has given me the = opportunity to see what many churches in the two Carolinas do or have done for hymns. =   Being a guest, I can usually get away with doing my own thing, and it's amazing to hear the comments from congregants. I often hear that they are =   much more in the mood to sing a hymn when there is some sort of exciting introduction, rather than a standard playthrough or first/last line introduction to a hymn that they know. I would encourage other list members to do some creative things with the = hymn introduction. You will be surprised at how much more lustfully the people =   will sing if they are excited about the hymn that is being introduced.   Just some thoughts.....   Monty Bennett   --part1_95.2153a4e6.2a92cf74_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">Several people have been talking about = "playthroughs" vs. abbreviated intros for hymns.&nbsp; I was taught that a = complete playthrough was only necessary when introducing a new hymn or a = non-familiar hymn, and that for all intensive purposes, a shortened intro = was sufficient.&nbsp; As I have gotten older, (I'm the ripe old age of 32 = now!) I have even gotten out of playing the first/last line intro, and = have gotten creative, using pieces based on the hymn that will be sung, or = playing a fanfare and then doing a segue into the hymn intro.&nbsp; For = example, when singing CWM Rhondda, I play opening part of the Manz = arrangement and at an appropriate place jump to the last line, which ends = with the bold statement of the last couple of measures.&nbsp; When singing = Nun Danket, I use Virgil's Bach transcription, transposing into whatever = key needed--Eb or F.&nbsp; I have also used the Oliphant Chukerb Ellacombe.&nbsp; Since I have been a free-lance musician for the past 4 = 1/2 years, since leaving Calvary Church, Charlotte, NC, it has given me = the opportunity to see what many churches in the two Carolinas do or have = done for hymns.&nbsp; Being a guest, I can usually get away with doing my = own thing, and it's amazing to hear the comments from congregants.&nbsp; I = often hear that they are much more in the mood to sing a hymn when there = is some sort of exciting introduction, rather than a standard playthrough = or first/last line introduction to a hymn that they know.<BR> I would encourage other list members to do some creative things with the = hymn introduction.&nbsp; You will be surprised at how much more lustfully = the people will sing if they are excited about the hymn that is being = introduced.<BR> <BR> Just some thoughts.....<BR> <BR> Monty Bennett</FONT></HTML>   --part1_95.2153a4e6.2a92cf74_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Intros--Be creative From: "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 16:06:16 -0700 (PDT)   Greetings, Listers... In the LDS hymnal, Joy To The World is in Dmaj. I like to introduce it = with the intro to the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah.   Also, for each hymn, the hymnbook compilers have placed brackets around = possible intro's to use, and not always just 1st/Last lines. Some of them work better than others   David Carter in much COOLER Sacramento (low 80's with our patented Delta Breeze)   --- RMB10@aol.com wrote: > Several people have been talking about "playthroughs" vs. abbreviated = intros > for hymns.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs http://www.hotjobs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3074 - 08/19/02 From: "Carol Scott" <dclscott@skyenet.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:18:11 -0400   I play a full verse of any unfamiliar hymn, and of the hymn that follows = the sermon, as people seem to need some transition time from listening to = participating (and perhaps an extra moment or two to complete their own = thought-responses to the message). Otherwise, they seem to appreciate an = abbreviated introduction, especially since they generally stand as soon as = I start to play.   Carol Scott   > Speaking of announcing hymns and making visitors feel at home, one = rector > was opposed to abbreviated play-overs of hymns on the organ. He wanted = the > entire tune played through on the grounds that this was friendlier to > visitors and newcomers. Expert church musicians have explained, of = course, > that the purposes of the playover are to set (1) the key, (2) the tempo, = and > (3) the mood, none of which requires playing the whole melody. Yet I am > willing to believe that this clergyman's argument has merit. Since then = I > have usually given complete play-overs, except perhaps for a familiar = last > hymn: if the service has run long or the building has become stuffy, I = sense > that everyone just wants out and will appreciate getting the play-over = done > with.      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Intros--Be creative From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:22:42 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3112629762_915007 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 8/19/02 6:47 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > Several people have been talking about "playthroughs" vs. abbreviated = int=3D ros > for hymns. =3D20 >=3D20 > snip >=3D20 > For example, when singing CWM Rhondda, I play opening part of the Manz > arrangement and at an appropriate place jump to the last line, which = ends=3D with > the bold statement of the last couple of measures. When singing Nun = Dank=3D et, I > use Virgil's Bach transcription, transposing into whatever key = needed--Eb=3D or > F. I have also used the Oliphant Chukerb Ellacombe. >=3D20 >=3D20 > Monty, I LOVE it! You=3DB9re the kind of guy that makes me come back to = your > church AGAIN, and again. And even again. >=3D20 > Alan >=3D20     --B_3112629762_915007 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Hymn Intros--Be creative</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 8/19/02 6:47 PM, = &quot;RMB10@aol.com&quot; =3D &lt;RMB10@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">Several people have = been ta=3D lking about &quot;playthroughs&quot; vs. abbreviated intros for hymns. = &nbsp=3D ;<BR> <BR> snip<BR> <BR> For example, when singing CWM Rhondda, I play opening part of the Manz = arra=3D ngement and at an appropriate place jump to the last line, which ends with = t=3D he bold statement of the last couple of measures. &nbsp;When singing Nun = Dan=3D ket, I use Virgil's Bach transcription, transposing into whatever key = needed=3D --Eb or F. &nbsp;I have also used the Oliphant Chukerb Ellacombe. = &nbsp;<BR> <BR> <BR> Monty, I LOVE it! &nbsp;You&#8217;re the kind of guy that makes me come = bac=3D k to your church AGAIN, and again. &nbsp;And even again.<BR> <BR> Alan<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3112629762_915007--    
(back) Subject: Re: Gold Pipes (HELP) From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 11:40:13 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_3fec.31cb.466f Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Daniel, et al.   I think that the selection of the pipe COLOR is primarily based on the rest of the "worship space". My church recently contracted for a new instrument and we specified that the facade pipes BE gold colored. If you saw our sanctuary, you would immediately understand why. There is a great deal of gold leaf trim in the space and the Candelabras, collection plates, and other accoutrements are all brass. Natural pipe metal colored pipes would simply not blend with this scheme. Perhaps addressing the color issue from a standpoint of "fitting in with the rest of the space" is your best argument.       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   On Mon, 19 Aug 2002 07:51:59 EDT Icedad@aol.com writes: Dear Pipe Chatters,   I need your help and advice. Our installation is about a month old. We have two beautiful displays of silver pipework on both sides in the front of the sanctuary. The larger pipes are zinc with coke tin tuners. The rest of the exposed pipework is gleaming spotted metal. It is quite attractive as well as quality sounding. I have been approached by several members of the congregation asking me WHY the pipes are not gold as in their previous church. I responded that gold pipes usually indicate a decorative facade that does not sound and the fact that silver pipes are the natural look for the best sound quality. I also told them with so many pipes in our exposed facades, gold would be completely overdone. Any suggestions or help for me to explain in my newsletter article? Have a good week.   Thanks,   Daniel ----__JNP_000_3fec.31cb.466f Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3Dcontent-type = content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3DUS-ASCII> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2716.2200" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV>Dear Daniel, et al.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I think that the selection of the pipe COLOR is primarily based on = the=3D rest=3D20 of the "worship space".&nbsp; My church recently contracted for a new =3D instrument=3D20 and we specified that the facade pipes BE gold colored. If you saw = our=3D20 sanctuary, you would immediately understand why.&nbsp; There is a great = =3D deal of=3D20 gold leaf trim in the space and the Candelabras, collection plates, and = =3D other=3D20 accoutrements are all brass.&nbsp; Natural pipe metal colored pipes would = =3D simply=3D20 not blend with this scheme.&nbsp; Perhaps addressing the color issue from = a=3D =3D20 standpoint of "fitting in with the rest of the space" is your best=3D20 argument.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><BR>Douglas A. Campbell<BR>Skaneateles, NY<BR></DIV> <DIV>On Mon, 19 Aug 2002 07:51:59 EDT <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:Icedad@aol.com">Icedad@aol.com</A> writes:</DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 10px; MARGIN-LEFT: 10px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px = =3D solid"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DModerne = size=3D3D3=3D =3D20 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">Dear Pipe=3D20 Chatters,<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I need your help = =3D and=3D20 advice.&nbsp; Our installation is about a month old. We have two =3D beautiful=3D20 displays of silver pipework on both sides&nbsp; in the front of the =3D sanctuary.=3D20 The larger pipes are zinc with coke tin tuners. The rest of the = exposed=3D20 pipework is gleaming spotted metal. It is quite attractive as well as = =3D quality=3D20 sounding.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I have been = approached=3D =3D20 by&nbsp; several members of the congregation asking me WHY the pipes are = =3D not=3D20 gold as in their previous church. I responded that gold pipes usually = =3D indicate=3D20 a decorative facade that does not sound and the fact that silver pipes =3D are the=3D20 natural look for the best sound quality. I also told them with so many = =3D pipes=3D20 in our exposed facades, gold would be completely=3D20 overdone.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Any suggestions or = help=3D for=3D20 me to explain in my newsletter article? Have a good=3D20 = week.<BR><BR>Thanks,<BR><BR>Daniel<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp= =3D ;=3D20 </FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_3fec.31cb.466f--     ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3074 - 08/19/02 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:51:35 -0400   On 8/19/02 7:18 PM, "Carol Scott" <dclscott@skyenet.net> wrote:   > I play a full verse of any unfamiliar hymn, and of the hymn that follows = the > sermon, as people seem to need some transition time from listening to > participating (and perhaps an extra moment or two to complete their own > thought-responses to the message).   I hear ya. Funny thing with our recent organists (three, over 10 years or so, and all of them of some considerable spiritual/musical sensitivity): They take a leisurely break from the final word of the sermon until the beginning of the hymn to follow. Five-second break: Sermon worthy of little or no contemplation whatso at all. Thirty seconds dead silence: Something worth thinking about, there! A full minute or more (it = happens!): Now THERE'S something to mull over for a while! And some preachers (and guest preachers) are AWARE of this measuring stick; they don't have to = like it, but it's real!   Hey, how often does the organist get a chance to register an OPINION about = a sermon? Thank goodness, ours have been pretty sensitive (and probably "right") in their judgments.   Alan      
(back) Subject: website update: somewhat off topic From: "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 17:03:40 -0700 (PDT)   Hi--please delete if not interested!   I just wanted to mention that I've uploaded a number of pictures to my website of the neighborhood in NYC that I live in. The community, called Parkchester, was planned and built as an entity in the late '30's, and is full of beautiful terra-cotta art...quite amazing for the middle of the Bronx!   Just thought that some of you artistic types might like a look at this amazing stuff. I'm not a professional photographer, but you'll get the idea.   In strictly organic content, the penultimate of my summer recitals will take place on Thursday, if I live long enough: it will be all Bach, and all chorale preludes. 12:15, Church of the Epiphany, 74th and York. Take the 6 train to 77th St. or teh M31 bus eastbound in front of Carnegie Hall and get off at the church. it's free, you can bring your lunch, and I hope a few of you might make it!   Best,   Jon  
(back) Subject: Re: Italian organs From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:53:24 -0500   If you get to Rome, be sure to check out the Musical Instrument Museum. There are several very early organs there, as well as the earliest known harpsichord etc. Very interesting! I spent most of one day there. Roy Redman   Del Case wrote:   > My wife and I will soon spend two weeks in Italy, primarily > the Tuscany region. > > Does anyone know of specific organs in the area that are in > the "must see" category or have any contacts that would be > helpful in getting access to organs? > > Del W. Case > Pacific Union College > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Announcing hymns. From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 19:50:11 -0500   In most churches announcment is redundant...if it's already in the bulletin it's just taking up time, usually by someone that enjoys listening to themself.   my opnion, and I stand by it.     jon bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 21:06:57 EDT   Dear Colin:   Colin wrote: Let's say I visit Holland and hear Alkmaar. I play in a church in the Uk which has a poor acoustic; the organ crammed in a chamber and the = resonance virtually nil. I go to an organ builder and say, "I've just heard the most =   wonderful organ. Do you think you could make pipes which sound like = Alkmaar and put them in a new organ for my church".   You went on to say that in a dead room Alkmaar would sound terrible. My point exactly. It was much easier to create a great sound in churches built of polished stone and great acoustics. It made the organ builder seem to be a true genius. You also went on to say that these same pipes and organ would sound disappointing in a dead room. I agree 100%. No amount of voicing or vintage pipes for the same size building which is dead, would capture the majesty so evident in a live room. The builder then is at the mercy of a room without any mercy whatever. The acoustics of the room in otherwords make or break a great organ. In fact it is one of the most necessary stops on an organ, either you have it or you don't.   I knew that, but it was nice to hear you say it too. :)   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Today's prelude... From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 20:07:36 -0500   Were you driving a Packard then Glenda? gee...I have a good friend that might be intersted in traveling with you <G>   Jon.   too keep things on topic...we (and I mean the town of st joe) is celebrating their "trails west" event. So we did "old" hymns throughout the service. "Shall We Gather", "Little Church in the Wildwood" (my best friend in HS was married there <G>), "Old, Old Path", etc. Most of the service was on the piano, as I think half the congregation was at trails west <G>. they have beer and wine tents....  
(back) Subject: Re: Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2002 20:12:20 -0500   Probably one of the best ways to listen to a room is to sing in it. The human voice can do many things, and listening to the way the room responds to singing is probably more effecient than dragging all sorts of electronic this and that into a room, and putting on a head set.   Just something that we do, and have been doing for quite a while.     jon bertschinger