PipeChat Digest #3081 - Wednesday, August 21, 2002
 
RE: Ballroom organ at Buckingham Palace
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: W. OLIPHANT CHUCKERBUTTY
  by "colin-hulme@bctalk.net" <colin-hulme@bctalk.net>
RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: W. OLIPHANT CHUCKERBUTTY
  by "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
organ music during sermons
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Announcing hymns--off topic now
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Chuckerbutty, Conte and Steve Lawson
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Chuckerbutty, Conte and Steve Lawson
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: is there chat on line tonight?
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
reverb/bac acoustics...
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Announcing hymns--off topic now
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Biggs recording of the Busch Reisinger Flentrop
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: A dash of Dutch (Part 2) LONG
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Ballroom organ at Buckingham Palace From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 10:11:36 +0100   Hello,   I can't be certain, but I think it was the Buckingham Palace ballroom = organ which was often played by Prince Albert and Mendelssohn together. = It is said that they took great delight in having Queen Victoria run = from side to side of the organ bench pulling out and pushing in stops.   That is always fun.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK        
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 10:26:37 +0100     Hello,   Malcolm Wechsler is absolutely right, but I wonder if he would agree = with me that the biggest challenge is one of acoustic absorbency rather = than a lack of resonance?   This requires a different answer again, and goes some way to explaining = the high wind pressures used in the USA and, of course, the many = antiphonal divisions.   In such buildings, I suspect that anything on low wind pressure is = either going to "scream" or sound "lost".   The Royal Festival Hall organ is a classic. If the artificial electronic = acoustic is switched off and one sits at the back of the hall, the only = thing which gets to the back are the top notes of the smaller ranks and = the gruff bark of the pedal reeds....not very pleasant. That hall makes = a nonsense of an otherwise magnificent instrument.   Dare I say it? Wouldn't a Wurlitzer sounds better?   Oooops!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK              
(back) Subject: Re: W. OLIPHANT CHUCKERBUTTY From: "colin-hulme@bctalk.net" <colin-hulme@bctalk.net> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 10:43:31 +0100       Douglas Morgan wrote: > > > > There is one nice piece entitled "Paen" recorded by > James Culp on the organ at First Presbyterian Church > in Kilgore, Texas where Roy Perry was for many years. > It is on the Pickwick label in The Orchid Series. The > CD is ORCD 11019. That is the only recording I know > of which includes a composition of Chuckerbutty. > > D. Keith Morgan > > It is also on Nigel Ogden's CD "Moonlighting" on the organ of Lincoln = Cathedral The CD is CRCD6057 on the Minster Cantoris = Label-www.cantoris.co.uk   Cheers,   Colin.    
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 10:58:04 +0100   Helo,   Sebastian wrote:-   With the=20 exception of ultimate chords, cavernous rooms destroy polyphony, = subtelty,=20 phrasing, voice leading, and clarity. As an aside, it is not helpful to=20 choral, chamber, or solo instrumental music either.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   I think I would dispute this; my recent travels reminding me of = something to the contrary.   I don't want to harp on about Alkmaar or Haarlem, but both churches have = a fairly vast acoustic....Haarlem especially at around 6 seconds. = However, they are certainly not a "confused" acoustic, but quite clean = in the sense that things just die away slowly.   Believe me, from almost anywhere in the building, it is possible to = follow perfectly the contrapuntal thread. I heard inner parts in Reger's = "Wachet Auf" which I have never heard before in ANY building...and you = can't get much more confusing than Reger. The next step is 12 tone and = cacophony.   In the past, I have heard choral music at Haarlem, which sounds simply = superb, as it does in the better cathedral acoustics in the UK.   As for voice leading and subtlety of phrasing, THE most memorable = recital I ever heard was at Haarlem many years ago, when Piet Kee was on = outstanding form playing an organ he knew to perfection.   However, I would agree with Sebastian about "confused" = acoustics....there is nothing worse....St.Paul's London and York Minster = are just two examples.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK  
(back) Subject: Re: W. OLIPHANT CHUCKERBUTTY From: "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 03:00:17 -0700 (PDT)   Thanks for the information. I didn't know about that one, so I'll look it up so I can hear it.   D. Keith Morgan     --- "colin-hulme@bctalk.net" <colin-hulme@bctalk.net> wrote: > > > Douglas Morgan wrote: > > > > > > > > There is one nice piece entitled "Paen" recorded > by > > James Culp on the organ at First Presbyterian > Church > > in Kilgore, Texas where Roy Perry was for many > years. > > It is on the Pickwick label in The Orchid Series. > The > > CD is ORCD 11019. That is the only recording I > know > > of which includes a composition of Chuckerbutty. > > > > D. Keith Morgan > > > > It is also on Nigel Ogden's CD "Moonlighting" on > the organ of Lincoln Cathedral The CD is CRCD6057 on > the Minster Cantoris Label-www.cantoris.co.uk > > Cheers, > > Colin. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? HotJobs - Search Thousands of New Jobs http://www.hotjobs.com  
(back) Subject: organ music during sermons From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 06:28:52 EDT     --part1_98.2ac3ef3b.2a94c564_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Bruce said: >How neat. Ever have an organist start playing quietly about half-way >through the sermon?? This is a common practice in AME church in these parts >and is often quite dramatic.   It's not just a common practice in the AME Church. I am one of the = organists for the largest predominantly Black church in Charlotte, NC, (Friendship Missionary Baptist Church) and we play quietly at the end of the sermon, = as the pastor winds up the sermon and starts into the invitation, which then leads into the invitation hymn. Being a White man, it was an easy transition to play in this church = because there are so many similarities between my home church (Pentecostal) and = this church.   At my home church, the organist usually plays during the last few minutes = of the sermon. There's usually some kind of discreet eye contact or signal = from the pastor to let her know when he wants the music to start.   Any kind of underscore music is quite effective, but it so rare in = mainline churches, but seems to be a staple in churches of the evangelical ilk. = For those of us who have a background in evangelical churches, it's second = nature to do underscoring, and when I'm playing at a mainline church, there are = so many times when I want to start playing quietly at appropriate times, but = I know it would throw everyone into a tizzy thinking that I had totally = jumped over a part in the service or something, so I just refrain, but I find = prayer time, the benediction, and the climactic points of a sermon kind of dry without the quiet organ playing underneath.   Monty Bennett   --part1_98.2ac3ef3b.2a94c564_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">Bruce said:<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">&gt;How = neat.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Ever have an organist start playing quietly = about half-way <BR> &gt;through the sermon??&nbsp;&nbsp; This is a common practice in AME = church in these parts <BR> &gt;and is often quite dramatic.<BR> <BR> It's not just a common practice in the AME Church.&nbsp; I am one of the = organists for the largest predominantly Black church in Charlotte, NC, = (Friendship Missionary Baptist Church) and we play quietly at the end of = the sermon, as the pastor winds up the sermon and starts into the = invitation, which then leads into the invitation hymn.<BR> Being a White man, it was an easy transition to play in this church = because there are so many similarities between my home church = (Pentecostal) and this church.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> At my home church, the organist usually plays during the last few minutes = of the sermon.&nbsp; There's usually some kind of discreet eye contact or = signal from the pastor to let her know when he wants the music to = start.<BR> <BR> Any kind of underscore music is quite effective, but it so rare in = mainline churches, but seems to be a staple in churches of the evangelical = ilk.&nbsp; For those of us who have a background in evangelical churches, = it's second nature to do underscoring, and when I'm playing at a mainline = church, there are so many times when I want to start playing quietly at = appropriate times, but I know it would throw everyone into a tizzy = thinking that I had totally jumped over a part in the service or = something, so I just refrain, but I find prayer time, the benediction, and = the climactic points of a sermon kind of dry without the quiet organ = playing underneath.<BR> <BR> Monty Bennett</FONT></HTML>   --part1_98.2ac3ef3b.2a94c564_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Announcing hymns--off topic now From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 06:40:01 EDT   >Shouldn't the correct term be "Order of Worship" ..... "Bulletin" just = does >not seem quite right for a religious service.   >Sand   The Order of Worship is the section of the service = folder/leaflet/bulletin, whatever you want to call it that lists the order of worship. Generally, there are announcements and other miscellaneous "stuff" in the latter = couple of pages. I call it a bulletin at church, since it has other information = in addition to the Order of Service. When I'm wearing my other hat as a = Funeral Director, I call the handouts Service Folders, because the only thing = listed in it is the Order of Service, nothing about the church covered dish = supper next Wednesday evening, the next ladies quilting guild get together, the senior citizen's bus trip to Branson, MO, or that the youth group is = having a beach retreat and the $75 dollar deposit need to be turned in by next = Sunday. When that stuff gets added, the handout goes from being a Service Folder = or Order of Service to being a Bulletin.     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:38:40 -0400   Yes, yes, and yes, and maybe!   I have often referred to certain buildings as "not organ unfriendly, but = not resonant either." These are the rooms that can't work up any reverberation for all kinds of reasons, but do not manifest "acoustic absorbency."   To be absolutely truthful about the success of the organ at Trinity, = Copley Square, Boston, which I mentioned yesterday as the scene of a remarkably popular noon Organ recital series, there is a substantial division at the west end, in addition to the instrument in the east. However, I have heard each section used alone, and the effect is still very fine. There is, by = the way, something beguiling about the well signposted name of the series: = "It's Friday at Trinity."   I suppose there are indeed lessons to be learned from the success of Wurlitzers in making an impact in some pretty cushy, dead theaters!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2002 5:26 AM Subject: RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces       Hello,   Malcolm Wechsler is absolutely right, but I wonder if he would agree with = me that the biggest challenge is one of acoustic absorbency rather than a = lack of resonance?   This requires a different answer again, and goes some way to explaining = the high wind pressures used in the USA and, of course, the many antiphonal divisions.   In such buildings, I suspect that anything on low wind pressure is either going to "scream" or sound "lost".   The Royal Festival Hall organ is a classic. If the artificial electronic acoustic is switched off and one sits at the back of the hall, the only thing which gets to the back are the top notes of the smaller ranks and = the gruff bark of the pedal reeds....not very pleasant. That hall makes a nonsense of an otherwise magnificent instrument.   Dare I say it? Wouldn't a Wurlitzer sounds better?   Oooops!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK            
(back) Subject: RE: Chuckerbutty, Conte and Steve Lawson From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 06:59:59 -0500   Guess you had to be there - it's not pretty and it's deadly.   Term of the day from the bailiff was the color of one party's hair - "turkey turd tan". Last week he made the comment, "She doesn't look like she'd have an immaculate contraption." Court is fun.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > (who only showed her butt once in court today) > >Did anyone take a picture? <vbg>   Colin          
(back) Subject: RE: Chuckerbutty, Conte and Steve Lawson From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:05:12 -0500   Oh, I meant to add one more incident to make it all organ-related. I sent a memo to the judges and department attorneys about my upcoming absences to prevent their setting hearings during those times. In it I included the trip to Atlanta in November to "attend organ dedication". One judge yesterday wanted to know which organ was I donating. I told him my brain, since I wasn't using it anymore. He said I could just list it nowadays on my driver's license rather than making a trip.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 08:09:17 -0400   Perhaps it is wrong to do so, but I love to hear all sorts of Organ and choral music both at St. Paul's, London, and also at our own northeastern = US example, St. John the Divine. Muddle, schmuddle, I love that glorious resonance, and one can find clarity along with the thrill of the reverberation by sitting near the crossings of both buildings. This is, in fact, where people tend to congregate during the noon concerts at St. Paul's. So, for me, there are no "confused acoustics."   I am a veteran of St. Paul's, having conducted my Canadian choir (St. = Paul's Cathedral, London, Ontario) in Wren's little building for a week of daily and Sunday services in 1972. We also sang at the Bovenkerk in Kampen, by = the way, not exactly a dead room either!   Taking up another of Colin's threads, I will remember always the only time = I ever heard Piet Kee, live, at one of a series of dedication concerts for = the glorious instrument at Mount Calvary Church in Baltimore. (This is the = last instrument built by Charles Fisk using the name Andover Organ Company, before he became C. B. Fisk. It bears the name Andover-Flentrop, in honor = of the assistance rendered by Dirk Flentrop) Taking up yet another thread, = Kee, in Baltimore, played a Reger piece I had not heard before, and have never heard since, a glorious Praeludium in D Minor, morphing a lot into D = Major, Opus 65, Volume Two.   Here ends a tapestry of several threads.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com     ----- Original Message ----- From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2002 5:58 AM Subject: RE: Organs in Acoustically Dead Spaces     Helo,   Sebastian wrote:-   With the exception of ultimate chords, cavernous rooms destroy polyphony, subtelty, phrasing, voice leading, and clarity. As an aside, it is not helpful to choral, chamber, or solo instrumental music either.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   I think I would dispute this; my recent travels reminding me of something = to the contrary.   I don't want to harp on about Alkmaar or Haarlem, but both churches have a fairly vast acoustic....Haarlem especially at around 6 seconds. However, they are certainly not a "confused" acoustic, but quite clean in the sense that things just die away slowly.   Believe me, from almost anywhere in the building, it is possible to follow perfectly the contrapuntal thread. I heard inner parts in Reger's "Wachet Auf" which I have never heard before in ANY building...and you can't get much more confusing than Reger. The next step is 12 tone and cacophony.   In the past, I have heard choral music at Haarlem, which sounds simply superb, as it does in the better cathedral acoustics in the UK.   As for voice leading and subtlety of phrasing, THE most memorable recital = I ever heard was at Haarlem many years ago, when Piet Kee was on outstanding form playing an organ he knew to perfection.   However, I would agree with Sebastian about "confused" acoustics....there = is nothing worse....St.Paul's London and York Minster are just two examples.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK          
(back) Subject: Re: is there chat on line tonight? From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:30:03 -0500   Oh no...I was there. I have stained fingers to prove it <G> (oriental walnut), and I also "fixed" a neighbor kids skateboard, then began voicing a 2' Mixture III for a project. finished that up yesterday. Today...4' Prestant, and measuring in the racking book.   Jon  
(back) Subject: reverb/bac acoustics... From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:32:29 -0500   Since the world is BENT on using lots of microphonesm how 'bout we put them on the PIPE organ, and run it all thru an "Echoplex"? We could adjust it so that we have as much reverb as we want!   Ok...so I'm just being silly.     Jon Bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Re: Announcing hymns--off topic now From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:37:44 -0500   Ok then...."SCORECARD"....the choir always hasta have a score card, so they know who's up next. LOL   Jon Bertschinger...  
(back) Subject: Re: Biggs recording of the Busch Reisinger Flentrop From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:42:52 -0500   Is it possible that the w/p is changing as well? I also remember it, but one change in pitch is in the middle of a phrase, not at the beginning/end of two different sections/phrases.   jon bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Re: A dash of Dutch (Part 2) LONG From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 08:47:10 -0700   I'm really enjoying this travelogue, but as a first generation transplanted Dutchman I will forgive your comments about cheese, which IS the national food...insn't it? ;-)   But in Holland a concert is a "concert" or possibly with the modern spelling that became "konsert" (someone fill me in?) but NEVER "konzert" which is the German spelling, as some older generation-WWII-remembering Dutch would have a real problem with.   To their credit though, Germany donated the Transept organ which is one of the three organs in the rebuilt St Laurens church in Rotterdam, city of my birth. And maybe I'm wrong but isn't the name St Laurens without the "t"?   I have vivid memories of sitting on the back of my father's bicycle and crossing the devastated center of Rotterdam on my way to visit my grandmother. In the center of those acres and acres of flatted rubble stood a silent skeleton of St Laurens, blackened, roofless and windowless very much a memorial to the destruction of the city's center. In later years as the area gradually was built up again a statue was erected by Zadkine, an artist who depicted a muscular figure with a gaping hole in its chest yet refusing to fall. Imagine my further delight, when many years after I emigrated to the US ,my new bride and I visited the restored St Laurens for a concert on its magnificent Marcussen, and were thrilled by the fiery reeds as "Finlandia" was played. Memories...   John V     > > >As things turned out, the second half of the organ konzert played by >Gijs van Schoonhoven commenced with the playing of the very old >(1511) Koororgel built by Jan van Covelens and recently restored by >Flentrop. > >This organ is tuned to mean tone, and the two pieces heard were the >Prelude in D by Scheidemann and a piece unkown to me entitled >"Daphne" by that Mr Anonymous again. > >Now, it is some time since I listened to anything tuned in mean >tone, and it really comes as an audible shock to hear truly pure >intervals and the occasional "wolf". This organ sounded quite >magnificent and very, very loud in spite of its small size....the >restoration has clearly been a great success. >There is something slightly surreal about listening to an organ >almost 500 years old, and still sounding so good. > >Then came the moment when the recitalist moved swiftly down the >church, up the stairs and into the console of the Grote Organ at the >West End. > >Although I spent an hour on this instrument in 1982, this was before >the restoration by Flentrop and when the organ was not only a bit >decrepit, but also out of tune. Even then, I was aware of a fine >sound, but being wedged between the main case and the positiv is not >a good place to hear an instrument.........the echo sounded OK >though! > >This time, the organ was in tune, splendidly restored and I was in >the right place in the middle of the nave. To say that I was >stunned by the Toccata in A by Krebs would be an >understatement....the sheer restrained brilliance >of the chorus work, the very thin chorus reeds which merely added >colour and, above all, the fabulous pedal reeds. I now realise that >this organ is every bit the equal of the Baavo organ, but in a very >different and purer way. >The Alkmaar masterpiece does not, and cannot enjoy the same degree >of musical flexibility, but for the great Baroque polyphonic >masterwork Preludes and Fugues, there is nothing to compare to the >sound of Schnitger. > >Although the organ SOUNDS loud, it probably isn't really THAT loud. >It is more a question of sonority, musical balance and voicing >perfection in what is not actually a vast church.....about 2/3 the >size of Haarlem. > >Having being bowled over by the full pleno and those glorious pedal >reeds, nothing could prepare me for the beauty of the quieter >registers and solo possibilities. Whether it was the beautiful >Cornet or the 2rk 8ft- Pirncipal used a solo register above 8 & 4ft >Flute; the effect was ravishing The latter combination was used for >the beautiful "Ach Gott, erhor mein seufzen" by Krebs. > >In true Dutch tradition, unlike the Haarlem concert, Gijs van >Schoonhoven ended his half hour second half with an improvisation on >the "Old 100th". >It was during this fine improvisation that I heard, for the first >time, the extraordinary tubular bell effect made possible by the use >of Flutes and the famous Cymbel Mixtur. At Alkmaar, the Cymbel >contains not only the unison and quint ranks, but also a fourth >sounding rank (C plays F). The effect is nothing short of >astonishing and, as a solo combination, perhaps unique in the world. >(Are there other examples?) > >The improvisation ended on full organ....possibly using as few as 20 >stops, with those magnificent pedal reeds strutting their >stuff......a fine ending if ever there was one. > >The usual standing ovation was well deserved, but I was surprised to >note that almost no-one waited to thank the organist. I was glad >that I waited and shook his hand, his face breaking into a grateful >grin .....the recital was not virtuosic, but it was well prepared, >well executed and thoroughly musical ....what more could anyone ask? > >Sadly it was time to go....but I had first to find Mark! I need not >have worried, for there he sat in church in the coffee >area.....drinking a bottle of Bier and smoking a cigarette!! There >are certain things in Holland which still take me by surprise, but >at least he wasn't smoking hash like the two teenagers on the next >table!! > >It was time to go and eat lunch, and as we wandered down a narrow >street, we passed groups of adolescents and children playing various >instruments....drums, guitars, an accordian and a flute; each with a >small hat for donations. A few yards further, and a street organ >bellowed out "Tulips from Amsterdam". Mark seized the moment by >grasping the hand of a Dutch girl and briefly waltzing past the >instrument......the admixture of fear, alarm and delight which her >expression converyed was magical. Her uncontrollable laughter >followed us down the street.. > >No sooner had we sat down to eat in a cafe, than the beautiful sound >of the town carillon chimed up.....so much music to enjoy on the >streets and only a limited time to enjoy it. We were soon back in >Zandvoort for a ittle more sun worship; the Saturday morning >following, our last day, before sailing back to the UK. > >Saturday dawned and we were up early for once.....a chance to wander >the streets of Rotterdam and make a visit to St.Laurent's Cathedral. >One of the four organs was being played quietly as we entered, but >alas, the great Marcussen west end orgel stood there in brooding >silence; a riot of burnished tin and red casework. Mark was utterly >staggered by the photographs taken after the bombing raid on >Rotterdam during WWII; a completely flattened lanscape with the >burned out shell of St.Laurent's Church standing alone.....a >poignant reminder of the inhumanity of war and the hard won freedoms >enjoyed in Holland to-day. > >I had intended spending a little time investigating the open-air >Maritime Museum in the harbour area, but as we approached, all hell >broke loose on the streets. Unwittingly, we had happened upon the >start of a pop parade which snaked its way through the city of >Rotterdam. Rotterdam is a very young and vibrant city, and this was >youth culture with a vengeance. > >What happened next took me completely by surprise. I was aware of >the fact that Mark had indulged in championship dancing, but when >his feet started tapping and his eyes watched the choreography of >the professional dancers on the street, I didn't QUITE expect him to >suddenly join in......with a passion! Nothing short of sensational, >just as he was "wowed" by my world and the organ at Haarlem >(especially), I too was "wowed" by his world....the sheer joy of >life. > >Still, I think it is best left to the up-to-twenty-something age >group rather than we "pipechatters". My own contribution to dance is >now restricted to increasingly scholarly performances of Bach's >"Gigue Fugue". > >As the cacophony of pop music died away, the distant sound of bells >was heard as the town Carilloneur struck up with a Gershwin medley >which included "Love is here to stay" and "Summertime". > >Suddenly, I knew why I loved Holland so much.......it is a sane and >balanced country in which can be found freedom of expression, great >energy, modernity, tolerance and people unafraid to enjoy >themselves. The balance is in the respect for traditions, old >fashioned virtues and a cultural heritage second to none. > >For organists and lovers of art, Holland is a treasure-house which >has the power to draw back the weary and spiritually refresh them >time after time. > >Until next year! > > >Colin Mitchell >UK > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org