PipeChat Digest #3083 - Friday, August 23, 2002
 
RE: DEAD ROOMS/BAD ACOUSTICS
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: DEAD ROOMS/BAD ACOUSTICS
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
A note on the name Chuckerbutty
  by "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
dash of dutch:  a dutch treat!
  by "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
test
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@optonline.net>
Re: Busch Reisinger Flentrop, was Definitely NOT electronic organs!
  by <AFberlin3@aol.com>
RE: organ music during sermons
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Dates
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Dates
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: organ music during sermons
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: organ music during sermons
  by <Pepehomer@aol.com>
Re: organ music during sermons
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: organ music during sermons
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Calgary Organ Festival and Competition
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: RE: DEAD ROOMS/BAD ACOUSTICS From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 13:03:02 +0100   Hello,   I thought that the first organists played at the Roman Orgies!   The job's been going downhill ever since.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     D.Keith Morgan wrote:-     Putting a fine pipe organ in this church would be like putting a prayer chapel in a whorehouse.              
(back) Subject: Re: DEAD ROOMS/BAD ACOUSTICS From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 07:07:31 -0500   yeh...now sum of us have to play at "christian" orgies....CD's, microphones, announcers, and..."O I forgot to tell you, we don't need a prelude this morning"... Found out yesterday that I'm #1 in the running for the other job. Sadly it's for the 8am service. The 10am service uses a "Praise Band"....cheeshe....   jon bertschinger...somewhere in the wildes of MO.  
(back) Subject: A note on the name Chuckerbutty From: "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 06:26:59 -0700 (PDT)   Hi--   I think it was on this list that this thread appeared a day or two ago....   The name "Chuckerbutty" indeed causes much giggling...but in fact it is a crude anglicization of a noble name, as I find in "Hobson-Jobson: the Anglo-Indian Dictionary," by Henry Yule and A. C. Burnell, published in 1886 by two long-time Imperial functionaries and by far the best source on Anglo-Indian expressions:   "CHUCKERBUTTY. This vulgarised Bengal Brahmin name is, as Wilson points out, a corruption of *chakravartti*, the title assumed by the most exalted ancient Hindu sovereigns and universal emperor, whose chariot-wheels rolled over all..."   The Sanskrit word "chakra" means literally 'wheel'. So, I assume that Mr. Chuckerbutty (or Mr. Chakravarti), the organist, came of a high-caste Brahmin family. Ah, you can't find cheap shoes in New York, but you can look up the meaning of words like Chuckerbutty!!!   :)   J      
(back) Subject: dash of dutch: a dutch treat! From: "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 11:14:05 -0700 (PDT)   What a wonderful, fun account! I am so sorry I've been snowed under with (chiefly) recital preparations--I am only now, eight days late, getting to this well-written and enjoyable tale.   Thanks!   Jon  
(back) Subject: test From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@optonline.net> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 18:15:10 -0400   test Pardon the test...thank you.   -- "So many men, so few bullets."      
(back) Subject: Re: Busch Reisinger Flentrop, was Definitely NOT electronic organs! From: <AFberlin3@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 19:22:04 EDT     --part1_a4.2ae346d3.2a96cc1c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I played the Flentrop in the BR Museum some years ago and was really = charmed by the instrument. Wonderful, sensitive action, and extremely clear and beautiful voicing. I did feel a strong sense of history, of course.   Alexander Frey     --part1_a4.2ae346d3.2a96cc1c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I played the Flentrop in the BR Museum some = years ago and was really charmed by the instrument.&nbsp; Wonderful, = sensitive action, and extremely clear and beautiful voicing.&nbsp; I did = feel a strong sense of history, of course.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Alexander Frey<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_a4.2ae346d3.2a96cc1c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: organ music during sermons From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 20:39:15 -0400   >we play quietly at the end of the sermon, as the pastor winds up the = sermon and starts into the invitation, which then leads into the invitation hymn.   Most of the preachers I have worked for wouldn't want the competition/distraction. The sermon is *their* time, more than is the service as a whole.   >I find prayer time, the benediction, and the climactic points of a sermon kind of dry without the quiet organ playing underneath.   Liturgical usages discourage background or "cover" music, I think, as manipulative and not God-centered. It would be perfectly fine if no words are being spoken aloud for a considerable period, e.g. offertory or = censing, during Communion, or for a *lengthy* procession, when there is enough time for the music to constitute an objective adornment in its own right.   It would be a great pity to discourage in any way the spectacular improvisations during post-offertory censing (usually several minutes) = that the likes of Peter Richard Conte can serve up in a highly liturgical = milieu. For that matter, his light, airy improvisations while the preacher is leaving the pulpit and returning to the sanctuary for the creed are also worthy, masterful miniatures lasting only 20-30 seconds. But most of us can't do more than meander in as brief time as that. In general, there is less wrong with silence than with fear of silence. If every "awkward" moment must be filled in with an amorphous ooze from the organ, what other motivation is there for doing so?   As for music underneath spoken words-- I can't think when liturgical traditions ever do this. I'd explain that there seem to be right-brain times and left-brain times during worship. The spoken word makes an intellectual appeal, while music makes an emotional one. Singing can arguably do both together, but routine instrumental accompaniment of the spoken word is a mishmash such that one wonders what the point is. If someone is both talking to me and arranging that I cannot give him my undivided attention, I think I would become very suspicious.   Just an alternate take... different strokes for different folks?   Paul    
(back) Subject: Dates From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 20:45:39 EDT     --part1_d8.1c7d32a3.2a96dfb3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Can someone be kind enough to post the dates for Karg-Elert (birth and = death, not courting -- grin).   Also, the death year for Samuel Barber.   Thanks in advance.   Neil by the Bay   --part1_d8.1c7d32a3.2a96dfb3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Can someone be kind enough to post the dates for = Karg-Elert (birth and death, not courting -- grin). <BR> <BR> Also, the death year for Samuel Barber.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Thanks in advance.<BR> <BR> Neil by the Bay</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d8.1c7d32a3.2a96dfb3_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Dates From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 19:58:17 -0500   At 8:45 PM -0400 08/22/2002, Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote: >Can someone be kind enough to post the dates for Karg-Elert (birth >and death, not courting -- grin).   1877 - 1933   >Also, the death year for Samuel Barber.   1910 - 1981   EVERYONE should have a copy of John Henderson's "A Dictionary of Composers for Organ" close at hand. It has ALL this information plus much more. i think there is a new edition out or coming out shortly. I know the the OHS Catalogue carries it and it is money well spent. http://ohscatalog.org   David  
(back) Subject: Re: organ music during sermons From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 21:05:56 -0400   on 8/22/02 8:39 PM, Emmons, Paul at pemmons@wcupa.edu wrote:   > As for music underneath spoken words-- I can't think when liturgical > traditions ever do this. I'd explain that there seem to be right-brain > times and left-brain times during worship. The spoken word makes an > intellectual appeal, while music makes an emotional one.     That's just the point: In some non-liturgical churches, the spoken word makes an emotional appeal, so that emotional music beneath it is highly appropriate!   By the way, from what little I remember of music history, didn't a lot of church music in the middle ages begin as traveling music to cover the time it took the priests to get from one place to another?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: organ music during sermons From: <Pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 21:31:38 -0400   Isn't the same practice slightly applied at the Crystal Cathedral? Maybe = I'm wrong, but I swear that sometimes I hear soft organ music when they = are reading from the Bible. I'm not sure what to think of this - it adds = a nice touch, but also seems to take away from the reverence of the Word = in a slight way.   Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA  
(back) Subject: Re: organ music during sermons From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 21:36:48 EDT     --part1_15f.12b54821.2a96ebb0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > sometimes I hear soft organ music when they are reading from the Bible   This used to be done during prayers. I still do it in our informal = service (albeit on piano).   However during sermons is another story entirely.   Neil Brown   --part1_15f.12b54821.2a96ebb0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">sometimes I hear = soft organ music when they are reading from the Bible</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> This used to be done during prayers.&nbsp; I still do it in our informal = service (albeit on piano).&nbsp; <BR> <BR> However during sermons is another story entirely.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15f.12b54821.2a96ebb0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: organ music during sermons From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 21:51:06 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3112897866_2643077_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   on 8/22/02 9:36 PM, Innkawgneeto@cs.com at Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote:     sometimes I hear soft organ music when they are reading from the Bible     This used to be done during prayers. I still do it in our informal = service (albeit on piano).   However during sermons is another story entirely.   Neil Brown   This brings back memories I had almost entirely forgotten. When I first started playing the organ in church in the early 1960s, subbing for the regular organist on our Wurlitzer reed organ at the Maysville, Ky., First Christian Church, one of the things I had to do was to play softly during the pastoral prayer, being sure to end in the key of the choral response = at its conclusion. It was rather free-form (I was about 14 years old), like the unconscious speaking. Also known as the Yellow Pages approache: let your fingers do the walking. I blush to think of it now.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       --MS_Mac_OE_3112897866_2643077_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: organ music during sermons</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> on 8/22/02 9:36 PM, Innkawgneeto@cs.com at Innkawgneeto@cs.com wrote:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> </FONT></FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT = FACE=3D3D"Arial">sometimes I hea=3D r soft organ music when they are reading from the Bible<BR> </FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> <BR> This used to be done during prayers. &nbsp;I still do it in our informal = se=3D rvice (albeit on piano). &nbsp;<BR> <BR> However during sermons is another story entirely. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Neil Brown</FONT></FONT> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> This brings back memories I had almost entirely forgotten. &nbsp;When I = fir=3D st started playing the organ in church in the early 1960s, subbing for the = r=3D egular organist on our Wurlitzer reed organ at the Maysville, Ky., First = Chr=3D istian Church, one of the things I had to do was to play softly during the = p=3D astoral prayer, being sure to end in the key of the choral response at its = c=3D onclusion. &nbsp;It was rather free-form (I was about 14 years old), like = th=3D e unconscious speaking. &nbsp;Also known as the Yellow Pages approache: = &nbs=3D p;let your fingers do the walking. &nbsp;I blush to think of it now.<BR> <BR> <BR> Randy Runyon<BR> Music Director<BR> Zion Lutheran Church<BR> Hamilton, Ohio<BR> runyonr@muohio.edu<BR> <BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3112897866_2643077_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Calgary Organ Festival and Competition From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 22:21:21 -0400   This evening the CBC Radio Two broadcast a two hour programme about the Calgary Organ Festival and Competition. They appear to have recorded all =   the winners in the different categories.   This was the first of two programmes, the second one is tomorrow evening, (Friday 23rd August), at 8.00 pm Eastern Time.   I do not know if they also broadcast over the Internet, for I heard it on FM, - but if you like good organ playing, this is a programme not to miss.   Bob Conway