PipeChat Digest #3089 - Sunday, August 25, 2002
 
Re: BR Flentrop(REALITY CHECK!)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: BR Flentrop(REALITY CHECK!)
  by "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Re: hymn gude
  by <PHarri5833@aol.com>
St. John's College, Cambridge
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: BR Flentrop(REALITY CHECK!) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2002 00:58:15 EDT   Dear Michael:   Thankyou for the courage it must have taken to tell the truth about some of the recording dishonesty of the 50's and 60's. As you pointed out, this sort of dishonesty also set organ design and voicing and scaling on it's ear for over a generation. You couldn't find anybody to tell the real truth until recently. I'm glad the truth which couldn't be told during the era is finally being analysed for what it really was, dishonesty. European baroque organs just didn't sound like that, but nobody would listen until now. They were exaggerated, dishonest farces, but everyone was expected to OOOOO and AHhhhh which they dutifully did. Were there good organs built during the period? Sure but they got little or no mention because they didn't meet the acceptable profile. Any organ that sounded full, rich and beautiful, were put down as tubby, fat, and honking ugly. Well, finally we do know the difference, and can now say so in public.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: BR Flentrop(REALITY CHECK!) From: "Douglas Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2002 22:46:05 -0700 (PDT)   It certainly is really good to hear some finally tell the truth about the "baroque" movement of a generation ago.   People used to insist on the most bizarre things that they knew absolutely nothing about, and they wouldn't listen to anyone who did.   When they were insisting on low cut-ups, open toe voicing, unnicked pipes, and low wind pressures, there was a time when I thought that they would replace the blower with a vacuum pump and get the pipes to speak by sucking in air.   The unnicked pipes would sit there and hiss and spit so that after you had listened to them for about two minutes, you would be climbing the wall.   The attitude of the organists (who were merely key-punch operators) reminded me of the story about the King's New Clothes. The little wanabes would agree with the big shots because they were afraid of being considered ignorant and would be out-of-step with the movement.   Suddenly a little child shouted -- "Mama!! The King doesn't have any clothes on!" Everyone then realized that he wasn't as smart and enlightened as he would liked for everyone to think.   D. Keith Morgan     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Dear Michael: > > Thankyou for the courage it must have taken to tell > the truth > about some of the recording dishonesty of the 50's > and 60's. > As you pointed out, this sort of dishonesty also set > organ > design and voicing and scaling on it's ear for over > a generation. > You couldn't find anybody to tell the real truth > until recently. > I'm glad the truth which couldn't be told during the > era is finally > being analysed for what it really was, dishonesty. > European > baroque organs just didn't sound like that, but > nobody would listen > until now. They were exaggerated, dishonest farces, > but everyone > was expected to OOOOO and AHhhhh which they > dutifully did. > Were there good organs built during the period? Sure > but they got > little or no mention because they didn't meet the > acceptable profile. > Any organ that sounded full, rich and beautiful, > were put down as > tubby, fat, and honking ugly. Well, finally we do > know the difference, > and can now say so in public. > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Finance - Get real-time stock quotes http://finance.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: hymn gude From: <PHarri5833@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2002 03:01:17 EDT     --part1_61.24c96afb.2a99dabd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 24/08/02 23:08:44 GMT Daylight Time, "Robert Eversman" = < highnote@mhtc.net> writes:     > Slightly off topic, but you guys are the experts. Is there a hymn guide = much > like the Episcopal Musicians Hnadbook which follows the lectionary and > references several Protestant hymnals. I would even find a general guide =   > which just provides suggested first lines a big help without any = reference > to a specific hymnal. Is there an on line service like this? Thanks, > Robert (Ps please do not suggest the Episcopal Musicians Hymnbook ! = LOL)   This partly depends on which lectionary you use. However all members of = the Royal School of Church Music receive a book called "Sunday by Sunday". = This is a quarterly publication and follows the Church of England lectionary = which may be similar to whatever you are using. For each Sunday it identifies = the bible readings and psalm and then lists around 20 hymn titles with cross references to the numbers for them in 14 different hymn book.   There are also around 20 suggestions for anthems in unison/two/treble = voices, in three and four parts and in five or more parts.   There is a section with ideas for Taize, Iona and World Music, a section = of songs for children and finally it lists half a dozen or more organ pieces = for before, during and after the service.   Al this arrives at no charge for a mere subscription to the RSCM which = also gets you their quarterly publication Church Music Quarterly. For further details see www.rscm.com.   It is not normally my task to select hymns unless the rector fails to make =   the selection in which case, I do refer to this RSCM booklet. The anthem title suggestions can be useful, though I might sometimes select a work on =   the same theme from that suggested but by a different composer.     Peter M Harrison   Organist and Director of Music, Emmanuel Church, Holcombe, Ramsbottom, GB & P H Music : 48 Moorfield : Edgworth Bolton : Lancs : BL7 0DH : GB fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 : tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 <A HREF=3D"http://www.phmusic.co.uk/">web: www.phmusic.co.uk</A> <A HREF=3D"mailto: peter@phmusic.co.uk">reply email: = peter@phmusic.co.uk</A>   --part1_61.24c96afb.2a99dabd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 24/08/02 23:08:44 GMT = Daylight Time, "Robert Eversman" &lt;highnote@mhtc.net&gt; writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Slightly off = topic, but you guys are the experts. Is there a hymn guide much like the = Episcopal Musicians Hnadbook which follows the lectionary and references = several Protestant hymnals. I would even find a general guide which just = provides suggested first lines a big help without any reference to a = specific hymnal. Is there an on line service like this?&nbsp;&nbsp; = Thanks, Robert (Ps please do not suggest the Episcopal Musicians Hymnbook = !&nbsp; LOL)</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> This partly depends on which lectionary you use. However all members of = the Royal School of Church Music receive a book called "Sunday by Sunday". = This is a quarterly publication and follows the Church of England = lectionary which may be similar to whatever you are using. For each Sunday = it identifies the bible readings and psalm and then lists around 20 hymn = titles with cross references to the numbers for them in 14 different hymn = book.<BR> <BR> There are also around 20 suggestions for anthems in unison/two/treble = voices, in three and four parts and in five or more parts.<BR> <BR> There is a section with ideas for Taize, Iona and World Music, a section = of songs for children and finally it lists half a dozen or more organ = pieces for before, during and after the service.<BR> <BR> Al this arrives at no charge for a mere subscription to the RSCM which also gets you their quarterly publication Church = Music Quarterly. For further details see www.rscm.com.<BR> <BR> It is not normally my task to select hymns unless the rector fails to make = the selection in which case, I do refer to this RSCM booklet. The anthem = title suggestions can be useful, though I might sometimes select a work on = the same theme from that suggested but by a different composer.<BR> <BR> <BR> Peter M Harrison<BR> <BR> Organist and Director of Music, Emmanuel Church, Holcombe, Ramsbottom, = GB<BR> &amp;<BR> P H Music : 48 Moorfield : Edgworth<BR> Bolton : Lancs : BL7 0DH : GB<BR> fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 : tel: +44 (0)1204 853310<BR> <A HREF=3D"http://www.phmusic.co.uk/">web: www.phmusic.co.uk</A><BR> <A HREF=3D"mailto: peter@phmusic.co.uk">reply email: = peter@phmusic.co.uk</A><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_61.24c96afb.2a99dabd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: St. John's College, Cambridge From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2002 18:01:58 +1000   If you want to hear the old Cone Gamba and the Spitzflute from the old orga= n in St. John's College, Cambridge, you will have to come to Sydney, Australia as we now have them in the restored and enlarged Hill/Letourneau organ (1998) in St Andrew=B9s Cathedral. Our two ranks from our 1866 Hill ha= d been removed sometime in the past and when St John=B9s bought their new Mander, they offered them to us as they were practically the same age as ou= r lost ones. I believe that Brisbane Cathedral in Queensland, Australia has Howells=B9 Swell strings from Gloucester Cathedral (I think that is the correct story).   Perhaps this could form an interesting new thread as to where famous ranks of pipes end up?   Mark