PipeChat Digest #3092 - Monday, August 26, 2002
 
Tom Lehrer
  by "Music" <maclagan.music@whsmithnet.co.uk>
Re:  Strange requests
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Recording Search (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
Re: Recording Search (X-posted)
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
RE: music in society/education/ was strange requests.
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: music in society/education/ was strange requests.
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: music in society/education/ was strange requests.
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Another true story ....
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Strange requests
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Tom Lehrer - OFF TOPIC
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Public Domain music (Xpost)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
RE: Tom Lehrer - OFF TOPIC
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Strange requests & a question
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Re: Strange requests
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Strange requests & a question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Seeking status info on Gainesville installation
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: Tom Lehrer From: "Music" <maclagan.music@whsmithnet.co.uk> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 11:34:37 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001F_01C24CF4.8F282820 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I don't want to flog the subject, but I too am a fan.   The book is indeed called "Too Many Songs by Tom Lehrer with not enough = =3D drawings by Ronald Searle" and my copy was published by Methuen in 1999. = =3D The ISBN in 0 413 74230 X.   I also have a double cassette tape of 23 of his songs called "The Best =3D of Tom Lehrer" on the PolyGram label number 522 209 4. It dates from =3D 1994 although the original recordings date from 1954.   Hope this helps you to find these.   Donald Scotland   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001F_01C24CF4.8F282820 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4522.1800" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I don't want to flog the subject, but = I =3D too am a=3D20 fan.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>The book is indeed called "Too Many = =3D Songs by Tom=3D20 Lehrer with not enough drawings by Ronald Searle" and my copy was =3D published by=3D20 Methuen in 1999. The ISBN in 0 413 74230 X.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I also have a double cassette tape of = =3D 23 of his=3D20 songs called "The Best of Tom Lehrer" on the PolyGram label number 522 =3D 209 4. It=3D20 dates from 1994 although the original recordings date from =3D 1954.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hope this helps you to find =3D these.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Donald</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Scotland</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001F_01C24CF4.8F282820--    
(back) Subject: Re: Strange requests From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 07:34:46 -0500   I had a set of requests for the funeral of a Vietnam veteran who had committed suicide that threw me for a loop. His brother asked for He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother; Sittin' on the Dock Side of the Bay; Let It Be; = and Stairway to Heaven. There was another song which I've mercifully = forgotten. After a little panic as to where I was going to find all of these songs, I ended up calling a friend who does a 60's and 70's piano/singer thing. I knew he'd been playing a Hammond, so he was marginally used to organs, and that the funeral home had one of those electroids with the two offset short-compass manuals (hence, useless for playing most legit organ music), so I figured that said friend could handle it. He played a bunch of other more-or-less-appropriate songs from the period for prelude and postlude, = so it all worked out to everyone's satisfaction. My friend said it was the only time he'd ever played for a funeral, and about the only time he'd performed wearing a suit! Sometimes, when the requests get odd enough, = it's time to look for a specialist.   Paul Opel   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Recording Search (X-posted) From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 09:41:12 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01C24CE4.B6AC6100 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hi Listers, I am searching for a recording that was once in my collection but has =3D seemingly disappeared (probably lent it out . . I've lost lots of music = =3D that way, too!). The organist was David Drury at Sydney Town Hall. The =3D music was virtuosic and a display of Mr. Drury's exceptional talent and = =3D skill. The piece on the recording that has instigated my search is =3D Stanford's Fantasia and Toccata in D minor. I've looked fairly high and = =3D low, catalogues and websites, etc., and nothing so far. Anybody know =3D this recording, or even better, how to find a copy of it? Thanks! Stephen Williams   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01C24CE4.B6AC6100 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4207.2601" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hi Listers,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I am searching for a =3D recording&nbsp;that&nbsp;was=3D20 once in my collection but&nbsp;has seemingly disappeared (probably lent = =3D it out .=3D20 ..&nbsp;I've lost&nbsp;lots of music that way, too!). The =3D organist&nbsp;was David=3D20 Drury&nbsp;at Sydney Town Hall. The music was virtuosic and&nbsp;a =3D display of=3D20 Mr. Drury's exceptional talent and skill. The piece on the recording =3D that has=3D20 instigated my search is Stanford's Fantasia and Toccata in D minor. I've = =3D looked=3D20 fairly high and low, catalogues and websites, etc., and nothing so far. = =3D Anybody=3D20 know this recording, or even better, how to find a copy of =3D it?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Thanks!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Stephen =3D Williams</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01C24CE4.B6AC6100--    
(back) Subject: Re: Recording Search (X-posted) From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 10:18:03 -0400   At 09:41 AM 26/08/2002 -0400, Stephen Williams wrote: >Hi Listers, >I am searching for a recording that was once in my collection but has >seemingly disappeared (probably lent it out . . I've lost lots of music >that way, too!). The organist was David Drury at Sydney Town Hall. The >music was virtuosic and a display of Mr. Drury's exceptional talent and >skill. The piece on the recording that has instigated my search is >Stanford's Fantasia and Toccata in D minor.       >(SNIP)   The recording is titled "Music for a Grand Organ"; it was issued by The Australian Broadcasting Corporation and marketed by Polygram. The number appears to be 432 527-2   HD      
(back) Subject: RE: music in society/education/ was strange requests. From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 10:38:52 -0500   Oklahoma City University (OCU) still has a huge community music outreach program. This fall, over 500 youngsters from local public schools are enrolled in some form of music instruction on our campus after school and on weekends. The organs on campus, including the just-renovated III/65 Holtkamp in the chapel, are as available as any other resources. The university has recently become an "all-Steinway" school, with 105 new = pianos delivered or on order. Ground was broken last week for a major addition = to and renovation of the music school complex ($30 million). Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Chicaleee@aol.com [mailto:Chicaleee@aol.com] Sent: Sunday, August 25, 2002 11:50 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: music in society/education/ was strange requests.     Ron,   I know what you are talking about. I, too, went to school in the (40s), 50's and 60's. We had a concert band that did symphonic music and toured. We also had a music theory class in High School. In Grade School, we had music class every day, and the teacher had us singing in 3 parts. In Jr. High, I started band in the 7th grade, marching and concert, and there was = a choir that met the same time. Our High School choir was one of the best = in Ok. and had an honors a capella choir. Music was as important as sports then.   My first experience with the organ was at the age of 4 when I heard the = pipe organ for the first time. I begged every organist we had to give me lessons, and they all said I would have to wait until my legs were longer, but let me play my piano lessons on the manuals. At 12 I finally began organ lessons, and at 16 was enrolled in the OCU preparatory music school and gave a few concerts. These opportunities are no longer available to high school students, and there are few organ majors in the Universities here.   This year at our schools, the choral teacher has to share the music room with the English and French teachers -- all teaching at the same time on = the stage. There is a choir at the 5th grade center, but no music, except by the home room teachers, in the lower grades. My attempts to write a grant for a violin program here has fallen on deaf ears. No one wants it. One = of the smaller towns did have someone write a grant for a choral program 5 years ago, and the program is still going. But when there are cuts the "frills" as OK calls music, are the first to go. I have been re-reading "The Mozart Effect" by Don Campbell again. He really brings up a lot of good points about the power of music, healing the body, strengthening the mind and unlocking the creative spirit in people. I worked with people = with disabilities for many years, using music with them, reaching some of them when nothing else worked. Once they had a success in music,    
(back) Subject: Re: music in society/education/ was strange requests. From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 12:11:37 EDT   Dear Peter:   It's a start, and the program at OCU a good one. The real work begins though convincing school districts to reinstate music appreciation, choral and band music as a necessity and not a frill. TV stations need to be encouraged to offer afternoon educational programs including music, instead of mindless cartoon presentations. This is where a local staion can take the lead. PBS stations put concert music on at night, it needs to be on, when children are up and can see it too. Public Service Television needs a lot of work to meet the public need. We need to encourage them to put in piano and organ spots too. The Old Omnibus programs were terrific for kids without talking down to them. These were programs families would watch together.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: music in society/education/ was strange requests. From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 12:57:19 -0500   We're so lucky in Winnipeg, Manitoba.   Here in St. James (a suburb), we have phenomenal music and arts programs. With 10,000 students in our school division, we have five high schools, = one designated a performing arts facility. Band programs are available for all students from Grade 6 - 12 and we get a participation rate over 50 = percent. Choral programs and drama classes are available in all middle and senior high schools. Every school in our division presents musical productions, some do dramas as well. We also have divisional choirs at Elementary, = Middle and Senior high levels, a divisional honor band program and a divisional theatre company for elementary through middle school kids.   We're implementing an Education Through the Arts program this fall in all our schools - last year we piloted the program in 5 facilities. This = program brings professional writers, musicians, artists, film-makers, etc. into = the classroom to use their talents to teach programs developed in concert with the regular classroom teacher. We don't have a painter teach painting but rather guide the children in using painting to illustrate, say, a social studies project or a science experiment. The pilot program was very well received so here we go whole hog.   Mind you, Winnipeg is an artistic town. With only 650,000 people (and = unlike a lot of U.S. cities not much trading area outside town), we have a = symphony orchestra, a world-class ballet company (and ballet school), an internationally acclaimed chamber orchestra, an opera company, and five resident theatre companies. Our Music Festival is one of the largest in North America, perhaps the world, with 27,000 participants this year. And yes, we have an extensive organ series featuring guest artists from around the globe.   Sometimes when we live in the midst of plenty, we forget how blessed we really are.   TTFN, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: Another true story .... From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 18:51:14 +0000   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV><FONT size=3D2> <P>Having read Colin Mitchell's witty "organ crawl" - does the organ ever = appear in this wonderful shaggy dog story, Colin? - I thought I might = contribute one of my own. Like Colin's, this is totally true. Not a word = is made up. It is equally on - or off - topic as the mood takes you. </P> <P>I had just finished playing the Great G major with a tasteful flourish = of full organ with 32' reeds, as I am sure Bach would have done, plus the = Tuba for the last chord if he had had one, or even one too many, when the = delicate aroma of "Pot au feu" from the oven summoned me to dinner. I left = Klaidi to the organ with the stipulation that he wear the headphones, as I = wished to enjoy my meal in peace. He has not discovered the quiet stops = yet. A bottle of Chardonnay '97 - a very good year around here - was = decanted and my houseboy opened the door to my balcony, wherewith I made = an entrance to a round of applause from some highly intelligent cats who = obviously appreciated Bach, or maybe they realised it was dinner time. = </P> <P>Now the cats of Katerini are a cut above your average cat. They have to = be in order to survive the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune hurled = at them by Greek kids, who regard anything moving as a legitimate target = for their surplus energy. I have tried to educate them away from such = barbarities, but so far in vain. </P> <P>Sometimes I feed these poor indigent waifs and strays, and even the = cats if the mood takes me. However tonight was an "Oxi" night. "Oxi" means = "No". The cats are bilingual - maybe even trilingual - they certainly = speak Greek and English. They got the message, apart from one very = determined small creature, who made it quite clear that she - for it was = definitely a "she" - was not going until she had got some food. My = protestations of innocence of sustenance fell on deaf ears - she looked at = me firmly in the eye and said "Wait!" With one bound she was over my = neighbour's wall, keeping me firmly in her sights, before disappearing = momentarily under the steps of the house, only to reappear a couple of = seconds later holding two tiny kittens in her mouth. "It's for my babies - = not me!" she said. My heart melted - what else could it do in the = circumstances? - and so I gave her the remains of the delicious lamb I had = been eating. </P> <P>Somewhat inevitably after this, she re-appeared for food regularly, and = once you've started it's hard to stop. After three weeks she decided I = could probably look after her kittens better than she could, so three = small bundles of fur greeted me on the balcony the other morning. I now = have four kittens to feed. No doubt their photos will shortly appear on my = web site!</P> <P>Talking about web sites, this brings me back to the subject of organs. = I have a new "bigger, better, uncut" website on line at = http://pieria.forthnet.gr/~johnfoss/ , shortly to become www.johnfoss.gr = This includes a "my favourite sites" page, with links to some organ sites. = I am particularly keen to develop these to include those sites which have = downloadable sound files, such as the Organo del Sol Major (JOHANN = SEBASTIAN BACH), organs under the Southern Cross (Ian Maciver's site), and = other organ related sites. so if any list members can put me in the = direction of sites they consider worthy of inclusion, please let me = know.</P> <P>And, as I said, every word is true - only the names have been = changed.</P> <P>John Foss</P> <P></FONT><BR><BR></P></DIV> <DIV></DIV><BR><BR><BR>http//pieria.forthnet.gr/~johnfoss/ <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV><B><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT = face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D2> <DIV></DIV></FONT></FONT></FONT></B></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>Chat with = friends online, try MSN Messenger: <a = href=3D'http://g.msn.com/1HM1ENXX/c144??PS=3D47575'>Click = Here</a><br></html>  
(back) Subject: RE: Strange requests From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 16:13:01 -0400   Ron Severin writes:   >Music was dropped because it offered kids an opportunity to grow in poise and mastery.... Solution: Parents take back local control of your child's educatrion, and don't be silent bystanders. Disenfranchise state controlled education   I agree completely. Consigning your kids to the default public school is one of the laziest and most significant ways to just go with the flow. = This isn't good enough anymore, because pop culture now contains such a high concentration of toxic waste. It is inimical to everything you try to do = as responsible, well-meaning parents. Even if the school itself makes a = token resistance to it, they will be among peers who don't. If this prospect doesn't fill you with a deep sense of disgust, and of your powerlessness = if your children are kept immersed in it, they are liable to be doomed. They deserve better. Myself, I'm rather a royalist: every child is a little prince or princess.   Your explanation as to why music was dropped is new to me, and I hardly doubt it, but another reason is sheer pervasive incompetence. A peripatetic music specialist cannot accomplish much in half an hour a week without serious reinforcement from classroom teachers. I believe that = when I was growing up in the 1950s, school systems in Wisconsin expected, on paper, half an hour of music daily in elementary classes. None of my teachers followed this prescription to a T, but they all made a good stab = at it. They could read music and sing, and were more-or-less qualified to = lead the class in song. Several of them played the piano. The older ones, at least, had themselves grown up when piano playing was an attainment to be expected of properly raised middle-class children (especially girls, but = to some extent boys as well). Needless to say, neither musical literacy nor skill on any musical instrument can be taken for granted in an elementary teacher anymore. So where are school systems going to find the ability to pursue a meaningful elementary music curriculum short of hiring about five times as many special music teachers as before?          
(back) Subject: RE: Tom Lehrer - OFF TOPIC From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 16:22:25 -0400   Alexander Fry writes:   >Tom Lehrer was a lecturer in mathematics at Harvard, I believe, in = addition to his sterling and more profitable career as the composer and performer = of these songs. Some of his albums were reissued on CD format a couple of years ago...   >In addition to the Vatican Rag, all the songs in his oeuvre are = deliciously clever. Some are absolutely outrageous. Enjoy!   The Boston-based NPR program "Sound and spirit", which in my locale wakes = me up on Sunday mornings, was about teachers and students this week, = obviously in honor of "back-to-school."   It concluded with a Tom Lehrer song, the hostess explaining that when she went to college his songs were very popular and she found them a = broadening introduction to the ways of different people, learning from them.   As far as I can recall, she left the audience to infer the pun: "Lehrer" = is German for teacher.      
(back) Subject: Public Domain music (Xpost) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 13:33:11 -0700   Greetings, Friends.   I am beginning a project that will place public-domain organ music on the 'net for free download. Before you ask, YES, VIRGINIA, the legal ramifications for EACH PIECE will be carefully researched.   I have a few questions/comments to the list(s):   - If you would be willing to assist by either photocopying or scanning = music and sending me the paper copies/scans let me know. This is particularly = for those of you who have either copies of PD music in your personal library, = or access to a major music library at a university or college. - Initially files will be in Finale .mus format, which can be opened and printed using the free Notepad from Finale... if there is sufficient interest, it will also be offered in PDF and possibly MIDI files. Which = is your preference? - for those not wanting to spend the time d/l all of the files, a CDR will be available for a small fee.   As this is liable to generate a considerable number of replies please = REPLY TO ME OFFLISTS at giwro@earthlink.net so as not to clutter the lists. I'll post results and = a follow-up in a few days, and will keep you informed of the = progress/posting of new files as they come up.   Musically yours,   Jonathan Orwig       --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.380 / Virus Database: 213 - Release Date: 7/24/02    
(back) Subject: RE: Tom Lehrer - OFF TOPIC From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 15:30:59 -0500   NPR ran a feature on Lehrer for his 70th birthday a few years ago, = complete with interview and clips from the songs in performance, as well as reflections on his days as an MIT lecturer. There was some kind of CD re-issue at the time, but no live "comeback" tour....   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul [mailto:pemmons@wcupa.edu] Sent: Monday, August 26, 2002 3:22 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Tom Lehrer - OFF TOPIC     Alexander Fry writes:   >Tom Lehrer was a lecturer in mathematics at Harvard, I believe, in = addition to his sterling and more profitable career as the composer and performer = of these songs. Some of his albums were reissued on CD format a couple of years ago...   >In addition to the Vatican Rag, all the songs in his oeuvre are = deliciously clever. Some are absolutely outrageous. Enjoy!   The Boston-based NPR program "Sound and spirit", which in my locale wakes = me up on Sunday mornings, was about teachers and students this week, = obviously in honor of "back-to-school."   It concluded with a Tom Lehrer song, the hostess explaining that when she went to college his songs were very popular and she found them a = broadening introduction to the ways of different people, learning from them.   As far as I can recall, she left the audience to infer the pun: "Lehrer" = is German for teacher.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Strange requests & a question From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 16:48:03 -0400       "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > > Ron Severin writes: > > >Music was dropped because it offered kids an opportunity to grow in = poise > and mastery....   The 'poisson French cooking' scheme was successful in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; albeit critics characterized it as 'fishy'. We live in a Free country - 'je'st say anything for the Halibut'   > Solution: Parents take back local control of your child's educatrion, = and > don't be > silent bystanders. Disenfranchise state controlled education   The "EduCATrion"(r) is a feline teaching aid that has moved many kids from the gutter. It has only twelve non-unified stops but makes a joyful noise in church.   > I agree completely. Consigning your kids to the default public school = is > one of the laziest and most significant ways to just go with the flow. = This > isn't good enough anymore, because pop culture now contains such a high > concentration of toxic waste. It is inimical to everything you try to = do as > responsible, well-meaning parents. Even if the school itself makes a = token > resistance to it, they will be among peers who don't. If this prospect > doesn't fill you with a deep sense of disgust, and of your powerlessness = if > your children are kept immersed in it, they are liable to be doomed. = They > deserve better. Myself, I'm rather a royalist: every child is a little > prince or princess.   Breath in.. It's quite toxic now - airwise.   > Your explanation as to why music was dropped is new to me, and I hardly > doubt it, but another reason is sheer pervasive incompetence. A > peripatetic music specialist cannot accomplish much in half an hour a = week > without serious reinforcement from classroom teachers. I believe that = when > I was growing up in the 1950s, school systems in Wisconsin expected, on > paper, half an hour of music daily in elementary classes. None of my > teachers followed this prescription to a T, but they all made a good = stab at > it. They could read music and sing, and were more-or-less qualified to = lead > the class in song. Several of them played the piano. The older ones, = at > least, had themselves grown up when piano playing was an attainment to = be > expected of properly raised middle-class children (especially girls, but = to > some extent boys as well). Needless to say, neither musical literacy = nor > skill on any musical instrument can be taken for granted in an = elementary > teacher anymore. So where are school systems going to find the ability = to > pursue a meaningful elementary music curriculum short of hiring about = five > times as many special music teachers as > before?   Hey! Public Education tends to the mediocre side of the equation. Where, oh where, are the pipe organs in the New York City High Schools??   Stan    
(back) Subject: Re: Strange requests From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 18:09:08 EDT   Dear Paul:   School vouchers sure would make sense. I'm sure music would come back big, if public schools thought for a minute that it would be the only way to stay in business. Perhaps now is a good time to vote it in. NEA is in noway truely interested in the education of our youngsters, but in the power to do what they want with them, which is next to nothing. The state teachers unions affiliated with NEA don't give a rap either. Power and might to control how little children will learn of any lasting value is the name of the game. California is the worst. I know because I worked within the system, and disliked what I saw going on. That's how large percentages of students graduate from High School that can neither read or write, let alone play music.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Strange requests & a question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 18:19:06 EDT   Dear Stan:   If mediocre is all the school system can muster in NY and CA why send them any money at all. 25 years ago both states were top achievers. Not anymore. The over ridding question is Why not? See my previous post.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Seeking status info on Gainesville installation From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2002 17:46:37 -0500   Bruce and others, what is the latest on the Fisk installation at First Presbyterian, Gainesville? I'm leaving in the morning for a conference in Orlando, and would come through and see you, but decided to fly down instead of driving to avoid the Labor Day traffic coming back Friday.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com