PipeChat Digest #3268 - Sunday, December 1, 2002
 
Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Who controls the volume?   ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Harpsichord
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Harpsichord
  by "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com>
Re: volume control and recordings
  by "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk>
Re: Harpsichord
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
My little organ
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 23:41:30 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3121544491_10244973 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 11/30/02 10:56 PM, "Wuxuzusu@aol.com" <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> wrote:   > Greetings list: >=3D20 > In a message dated 11/30/2002 8:43:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, > jjarvis@attbi.com writes: >>=3D20 >> I am saddened to think that anyone would sit on an organ bench Sunday >> after Sunday and only view it as a "Job". We are ministers to the >> people in the congregation. The prelude that is played sets the tone >> for the worship that will follow, the tempo, stops drawn and etc >> directly control the mood of the congregation as they sing (or not). >> Lives are changed during worship services and we must take our craft = and >> part in the service very seriously even if it appears that others = don't. >>=3D20 > Several points to raise with this comment: >=3D20 > 1. Is this also true when "out-of-tune" guitar players and = percussionists > serve as congregational worship service leaders? >=3D20 =3D80=3D80=3D80I=3DB9m generally with jjarvis. MOST congregations in this = country don=3DB9t HAVE =3DB3guitar players and percussionists=3DB2, in tune or out. Are = they so far to the left that they cannot STAND to do what most us do? >=3D20 > 2. If organists are considered as a minister to the people of the = congreg=3D ation > should they be renumerated in the same measure as the pastors that use = th=3D eir > voices to minister to the congregation? >=3D20 > =3D80=3D80=3D80Sure. Why not? Of course, if the pastor is paid only = for what he/she=3D does > on Sunday morning, both he and the musician are going to come on the = very > short end of the stick. I=3DB9m assuming that his/her salary is based = on > something MORE than that. >=3D20 > In a message dated 11/30/2002 8:43:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, > jjarvis@attbi.com further writes: >=3D20 >> If playing for a service is merely a job or even a "performance" I = would >> challenge you to reconsider your place on the bench. Let's remember = the >> high calling that we have to be ministers to the people in our >> congregations and count it an extreme privilege to be able to lead >> people in worship to our Lord! >>=3D20 > 1. On the other hand, our Lord received NO SALARY during the course of = hi=3D s 3 > year ministery.=3D20 >=3D20 =3D80=3D80=3D80So he and his posse went hungry? Remember Mary and Martha. = And there must have been others as well.   Ought organists therefore volunteer their services as they minister to the congregation?=3D20   =3D80=3D80=3D80Well, in my first congregation, that=3DB9s how it was done. = Or maybe a dollar a week. But that was rural North Dakota in the early 60s.   > 2. Should the congregation be required to refrain from any applause = after=3D the > organist or choir "performs", er , excuse me, ministers? >=3D20 > =3D80=3D80=3D80The word =3DB3requires=3DB2 does not fit well with = Christian liturgy. Applaus=3D e for > the organist is inappropriate Usually. But not always. Sometimes who = c=3D an > help him/her/themself(ves)? >=3D20 > Does anyone applaud the pastor or priest after he (or sometimes she) > ministers? >=3D20 > =3D80=3D80=3D80Well, on a VERY special occasion, yes. Perhaps on the = First Sermon o=3D f a > new pastor. Or at his installation, where the congregation yells, = loudly=3D , > =3DB3Axios, axios.=3DB2 (=3DB2Worthy, Worthy=3DB2 in Greek.) And = certainly on the > valedictory sermon of a pastor retiring or taking a call elsewhere. >=3D20 > Do congregations applaud when someone leads them in the Lord's Prayer? >=3D20 > =3D80=3D80=3D80Now, THAT=3DB9S gross! >=3D20 > True dilemmas for those of us in the profession of church musicial = minist=3D ery. >=3D20 > =3D80=3D80=3D80Well, I don=3DB9t think it=3DB9s much of a = =3DB3dilemma.=3DB2 Let=3DB9s talk some more. >=3D20 > Alan     --B_3121544491_10244973 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume?</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 11/30/02 10:56 PM, = &quot;Wuxuzusu@aol.com&q=3D uot; &lt;Wuxuzusu@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Greetings list:<BR> <BR> In a message dated 11/30/2002 8:43:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, = jjarvis@att=3D bi.com writes:<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> I am saddened to think that anyone would sit on an organ bench Sunday<BR> after Sunday and only view it as a &quot;Job&quot;. &nbsp;We are ministers = =3D to the<BR> people in the congregation. &nbsp;The prelude that is played sets the = tone<=3D BR> for the worship that will follow, the tempo, stops drawn and etc<BR> directly control the mood of the congregation as they sing (or not).<BR> Lives are changed during worship services and we must take our craft = and<BR=3D > part in the service very seriously even if it appears that others = don't.<BR=3D > <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Several points to raise with = this co=3D mment: <BR> <BR> </FONT><OL><LI><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Is this also true when = &quot;out-of-tune&=3D quot; guitar players and percussionists serve as congregational worship = serv=3D ice leaders? <BR> </FONT></OL></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80I&#8217;m generally with jjarvis. &nbsp;MOST congregations = in this count=3D ry don&#8217;t HAVE &#8220;guitar players and percussionists&#8221;, in = tune=3D or out. &nbsp;Are they so far to the left that they cannot STAND to do = what=3D most us do?<BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> 2. If organists are considered as a minister to the people of the = congregat=3D ion should they be renumerated in the same measure as the pastors that use = t=3D heir voices to minister to the congregation?<BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80Sure. &nbsp;Why not? &nbsp;Of course, if the pastor is paid = only for wha=3D t he/she does on Sunday morning, both he and the musician are going to = come =3D on the very short end of the stick. &nbsp;I&#8217;m assuming that his/her = sa=3D lary is based on something MORE than that. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> In a message dated 11/30/2002 8:43:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, = jjarvis@att=3D bi.com further writes:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">If playing for a service is = merely a =3D job or even a &quot;performance&quot; I would<BR> challenge you to reconsider your place on the bench. &nbsp;Let's remember = t=3D he<BR> high calling that we have to be ministers to the people in our<BR> congregations and count it an extreme privilege to be able to lead<BR> people in worship to our Lord!<BR> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><OL><LI><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">On the other hand, our = Lord =3D received NO SALARY during the course of his 3 year ministery. <BR> </FONT></OL></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80So he and his posse went hungry? &nbsp;Remember Mary and = Martha. &nbsp;A=3D nd there must have been others as well. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Ought organists therefore volunteer their services as they minister to the = =3D congregation? <BR> <BR> <B>=3D80=3D80=3D80</B>Well, in my first congregation, that&#8217;s how it = was done. &nb=3D sp;Or maybe a dollar a week. &nbsp;But that was rural North Dakota in the = ea=3D rly 60s.<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">2. Should the congregation be = require=3D d to refrain from any applause after the organist or choir = &quot;performs&qu=3D ot;, er , excuse me, ministers? <BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80The word &#8220;requires&#8221; does not fit well with = Christian liturgy=3D .. &nbsp;Applause for the organist is inappropriate &nbsp;Usually. = &nbsp;But =3D not always. &nbsp;Sometimes who can help him/her/themself(ves)? &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Does anyone applaud the pastor or priest after he (or sometimes she) = minist=3D ers?<BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80Well, on a VERY special occasion, yes. &nbsp;&nbsp;Perhaps = on the First =3D Sermon of a new pastor. &nbsp;Or at his installation, where the = congregation=3D yells, loudly, &#8220;Axios, axios.&#8221; &nbsp;(&#8221;Worthy, = Worthy&#82=3D 21; in Greek.) &nbsp;And certainly on the valedictory sermon of a pastor = ret=3D iring or taking a call elsewhere. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Do congregations applaud when someone leads them in the Lord's Prayer?<BR> <BR> =3D80=3D80=3D80Now, THAT&#8217;S gross!<BR> <BR> True dilemmas for those of us in the profession of church musicial = minister=3D y. <BR> <BR> <B>=3D80=3D80=3D80</B>Well, I don&#8217;t think it&#8217;s much of a = &#8220;dilemma.&#8=3D 221; &nbsp;Let&#8217;s talk some more.<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3121544491_10244973--    
(back) Subject: Re: Who controls the volume? ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!! From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 23:54:32 -0500   This has been an interesting discussion. There are many things about = worship that I don't understand, and each person's contribution has helped this = "blind man find his way around the elephant".   When I was studying church music in college (in the mid-70's), the text we = used (I can't remember the title or author) warned about churches that use only = one kind of music in worship. It was an indication of a skewed theology. Generally, I've found this to be true. I think it's also vaguely Aristotelian -- something about art being a mixture of the strange and = familiar.   We little ones worship a holy, powerful, mysterious, loving God, who = deserves beyond the best of what we can do. We should not be approaching worship = with our own little agendas.   Now, regarding "Who controls the volume", pragmatically this is what I do: = I've made friends with the sound technicians. (Of course, you don't have this opportunity when you're a visiting organist.) I have asked them, kindly, = not to attempt to amplify the organ, or test the volume for feedback levels = during the prelude. When I sing, I indicate to the technician that I would prefer no amplification, but to keep it to a minimum if he must. It is a shame that people are so accustomed to amplification that they pretend they can't = hear live sound!   And rudeness... I'm sure we've all experienced rudeness, from time to = time. I've certainly had some rude experiences (someone once playfully snatched = away my postlude music -- during the postlude!), and I confess that I've also actually BEEN rude myself. And I have not always responded to rudeness in = the most helpful way. After reviewing this discussion, I resolve to avoid = anger (OK this is like asking a politician not to lie), although I think there are = times when the right kind of anger is justified and effective. For me it's just = rare that I ever get it right. I know storming out doesn't solve anything.   This is what I WANT to do: play the organ so gloriously that people can't = help being blessed or edified. The sound technician won't want to touch that = dial! I am far away from such a dream, but I work hard each week, and each week = is a little better.   I think that those musicians who just "have jobs" in churches pose an interesting dilemma. One the one hand, we need such gifted people in = these venues. On the other hand, music is best served with the whole heart.   I don't know if all this rambling amounts to 2 cents yet, but I think I'm = done. Thanks to all for chatting!   Mark Koontz      
(back) Subject: Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 01:18:04 EST     --part1_135.1858163e.2b1b039c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 11/30/2002 9:58:11 PM Central Standard Time, Wuxuzusu@aol.com writes:     > If organists are considered as a minister to the people of the = congregation > should they be renumerated in the same measure as the pastors that use >   AMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   --part1_135.1858163e.2b1b039c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 11/30/2002 9:58:11 PM Central Standard Time, Wuxuzusu@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">If organists are = considered as a minister to the people of the congregation should they be = renumerated in the same measure as the pastors that use their voices to = minister to the congregation</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>AMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!</FONT></HTML>   --part1_135.1858163e.2b1b039c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Harpsichord From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 01:19:08 EST     --part1_147.3daaffc.2b1b03dc_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   if you are just getting started-i suggest that you buy a 4 or 5 octave chromatic tuner-vio lab makes a nice one.     --part1_147.3daaffc.2b1b03dc_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>if you are just getting = started-i suggest that you buy a 4 or 5 octave chromatic tuner-vio lab = makes a nice one. <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_147.3daaffc.2b1b03dc_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 01:19:42 EST     --part1_152.182d151e.2b1b03fe_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   wow   --part1_152.182d151e.2b1b03fe_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>wow</FONT></HTML>   --part1_152.182d151e.2b1b03fe_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Why are we playing?? was: Who controls the volume? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 01:22:53 EST     --part1_143.3dda341.2b1b04bd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   In a message dated 11/30/2002 10:47:49 PM Central Standard Time,=3D20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:     > Of course, if the pastor is paid only for what he/she does on = Sunday=3D20 > morning, both he and the musician are going to come on the very short = end=3D20 > of the stick. I=3DE2=3D80=3D99m assuming that his/her salary is based = on someth=3D ing MORE=3D20 >=3D20   In the defense of Pastors---they are in thhe office all week dealing = with=3D20 other peoples' problems--visiting the sick and dying constantly etc....it = is=3D =3D20 a full time and demanding job. However-we practice all week....   --part1_143.3dda341.2b1b04bd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 11/30/=3D 2002 10:47:49 PM Central Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Of course, if the pastor = is=3D paid only for what he/she does on Sunday morning, both he and the = musician=3D20=3D are going to come on the very short end of the stick. = &nbsp;I=3DE2=3D80=3D99m assu=3D ming that his/her salary is based on something MORE than that</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>In the defense of Pastors---they are in thhe office all week dealing = wit=3D h other peoples' problems--visiting the sick and dying constantly = etc....it=3D20=3D is a full time and demanding job. &nbsp;However-we practice all = week....</FO=3D NT></HTML>   --part1_143.3dda341.2b1b04bd_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Harpsichord From: "MediaConstituents" <kealypaul@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 22:38:08 -0800 (PST)   I have a Baldwin Electric harpsichord, with wire strings, and electronic pickups similar to an electric guitar. It has a nice harpsichord-y look (more like a baby grand piano) in an aluminum case. I sort of feel like Schroder playing his toy piano.   The electronic pickups are split into two halves of the keyboard, one at the quills and the other curving. Which means it has four output jacks, for the tinny sound or the more mellow string tone. It also has a lute lever for stacatto sound, more a gimmick.   It doesn't stay in pitch very well, either.   Actually I got it years ago for a client who needed a harpsichord and we were set to rent one from the U of Redlands, when the deal fell through; he said we could use an electronic one if it really had look and feel of a real harpsichord, and this one did remarkably well. We bought it used from a some young brothers called the Jacksons. Seems their lead singer went solo, and they had some stuff to get rid of.   Anyhow, I bought it, and it is portable enough to use for wedding gigs and all. Years ago at an AES meeting at the Ambassador Auditorium they made the statement they did not allow electronic instruments on stage, the only exception being a Baldwin Electronic Harpsichord. I thought that was interesting at the time.   Paul       __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. http://mailplus.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: volume control and recordings From: "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 07:06:02 -0000   Whilst Ray's approach is a commendable one that can sometimes produce wonderful results, it is not always a workable one, particularly if.taking into account the practical needs of operating in the real and highly commercial world. This introduces all manner of constraints, not least how much the session time is going to cost. It is lucky if this approach can place the mics in the ideal spot first time round, but how do you decide = it was ideal unless some alernatives are also tested? This means time and = cost, not only for the engineer and producer but also for as many musicians, = organ tuners, caretakers, etc. as may be involved in the process. When dealing with a choir and orchestra there can be an awful lot of hourly charges = being clocked up!   Making no adjustments to controls is desirable in the ideal world, but so many locations have sub-sonic rumble from distant trains and trucks and leaving this in a recording may be just a minor irritation when it is directly played back over a truly full range system capable of reproducing this sub-bass content. However, releasing this on a commercial CD will produce very negative reviews and in the event your CD is to be broadcast, will waste much of the available data space on cable, satellite, DAB and other digital transmission systems, leaving far less for the important = part of the music. Allowing the quietest sections to remain as quiet as they = were in a silent cathedral is fine for replay in perfect conditions, but don't offer this as a feed for the live broadcast of an evensong service to a broadcaster! Offering no amplification will certainly not help the prayers and readings to be heard in many large buildings, though I do agree that proper vocal projection is prefferable to microphones in most small and modest churches and chapels.   I'm glad to know that Ray "now are" an engineer, though I'd respectfully suggest that becoming a competant professional engineer takes a little longer than 12 months even if you do read every book on the subject. It certainly does not ride well in any discipline, whether organ playing, = organ building or audio engineering to dismiss the methods used by those who = have many year's experience in that sphere when one admits to having a very = short time during which to stumble into the inevitable pitfalls that area will contain.   Regards Peter M Harrison Director of Music, Emmanuel Church, Holcombe   & P H Music : 48 Moorfield : Edgworth Bolton : Lancs : BL7 0DH : GB fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 : tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 web: www.phmusic.co.uk         Ray Kimber" <ray@kimber.com> wrote: | | I have been reading with much compassion the posts regarding volume changes by "engineers". (last year I couldn't spell audio engineer and = now I are one).... ..I have virtually every book ever written on recording and microphones, have made many controlled experiments and have concluded that such recordings should be captured and not "engineered". | | My current rules are: Use only two omnidirectional mics, so far I like Neumann M-150 or DPA 3259A or Sennheiser MKH 800 (in omni mode. Go direct from the mic preamp to the recorder, no mixer, no equalizer, no limiter/compression and don't touch the controls during the = recording...... | | Many engineers, recording and PA, think that they have to be constantly tweaking the mix during the performance, or they have electronics that = does the same thing, such as compressors. My feeling is that such engineering induces aural motion sickness. | | Go for minimalist ( or zero) amplification and minimalist recordings. | Best regards, | Ray Kimber      
(back) Subject: Re: Harpsichord From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 03:02:56 EST     --part1_137.182c262d.2b1b1c30_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   in addition to a real harpsichord i have a hohner d6 clavinet-talk about strange vintage stuff...   --part1_137.182c262d.2b1b1c30_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>in addition to a real = harpsichord i have a hohner d6 clavinet-talk about strange vintage = stuff...</FONT></HTML>   --part1_137.182c262d.2b1b1c30_boundary--  
(back) Subject: My little organ From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 1 Dec 2002 09:05:51 +0000 (GMT)   --0-219266610-1038733551=3D:77380 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello,   First of all, I have changed e-mail address for the purposes of pipechat! = I was getting all the chat in, but could not send anything out.......hence = my protracted silence. (Was that a cheer I heard from across the pond?)   My new e-mail is:- cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk   The old one still works for IN messages etc.   Now to some better news.     You may recall that I had a major winding and tuning problem with the 11 = speaking stop masterpiece which I have played for the past 27 years (on = and off with a break of some years).   We have had Peter Wood & Sons look at the organ, adjust the schwimmer and = re-set the speech of certain pipes. The organ was voiced on 2.75 inches of = wind, and the addition of external springs to the Schwimmer had resulted = in a pressure about 1 inch higher.....no wonder some of the pipes were = attempting to overblow! The tuning was way out, and the smaller pipes of = the Great Mixture needed to be a quarter length longer at that pressure.   The end result is a restored sound......just like it used to be. Much less = forceful and more "singing" in quality.   The design of the Schwimmer is still a bit suspect; being a double pan = arrangement which doesn't work too well. For some peculiar reason, the = external springs are badly located; resulting in the Schwimmer board being = able to go "off centre" when sudden demands are made. So we have a bit of = an ongoing "flutter" problem from time to time.   My inventive mind has now ceased upon a possible "damper" arrangement = which may reduce the flutter effect.........it works on the principle that = springs of different length tend to have a natural damping/cancelling = effect......I shall discuss this with the tuner.   Anyway, most of the damage has been reversed....one or two pipes could do = with replacing where a wild attempt has been made to "encourage" them to = speak at impossibly high pressure!   I suppose the moral is.....never trust an amateur. The new guys have done = a splendid job.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                     --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-219266610-1038733551=3D:77380 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello,</P> <P>First of all, I have changed e-mail address for the purposes of = pipechat!&nbsp; I was getting all the chat in, but could not send anything = out.......hence my protracted silence. (Was that a cheer I heard from = across the pond?)</P> <P>My new e-mail is:-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <A = href=3D"mailto:cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk">cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk</A></P> <P>The old one still works for IN messages etc.</P> <P>Now to some better news.</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>You may recall that I had a major winding and tuning problem with the = 11 speaking stop masterpiece which I have played for the past 27 years (on = and off with a break of some years).</P> <P>We have had Peter Wood &amp; Sons look at the organ, adjust the = schwimmer and re-set the speech of certain pipes. The organ was voiced on = 2.75 inches of wind, and the addition of external springs to the Schwimmer = had resulted in a pressure about 1 inch higher.....no wonder some of the = pipes were attempting to overblow!&nbsp; The tuning was way out, and the = smaller pipes of the Great Mixture needed to be a quarter length longer at = that pressure.</P> <P>The end result is a restored sound......just like it used to be. Much = less forceful and more "singing" in quality.</P> <P>The design of the Schwimmer is still a bit suspect; being a double pan = arrangement which doesn't work too well. For some peculiar reason, the = external springs are badly located; resulting in the Schwimmer board being = able to go "off centre" when sudden demands are made. So we have a bit of = an ongoing "flutter" problem from time to time.</P> <P>My inventive mind has now ceased upon a possible "damper" arrangement = which may reduce the flutter effect.........it works on the principle that springs of different = length tend to have a natural damping/cancelling effect......I shall = discuss this with the tuner.</P> <P>Anyway, most of the damage has been reversed....one or two pipes could = do with replacing where a wild attempt has been made to "encourage" them = to speak at impossibly high pressure!</P> <P>I suppose the moral is.....never trust an amateur. The new guys have = done a splendid job.</P> <P>Regards,</P> <P>Colin Mitchell&nbsp; UK</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-219266610-1038733551=3D:77380--