PipeChat Digest #3274 - Tuesday, December 3, 2002
 
liturgical music was  who controls the volume
  by "Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Thanksgiving
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Shades of H G Wells
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Advent CDs
  by "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Shades of H G Wells
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Who controls the volume?   ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
RE: How to prove a Steady wind supply?
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net>
Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Who controls the volume? ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: How to prove a Steady wind supply?
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net>
RE: Who controls the volume?   ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: liturgical music was who controls the volume From: "Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 08:17:41 -0600   Sebastian wrote: > > Now is the time for us to seriously evaluate how an entire church > community gets to the point at which this type of thing is seen as "perfectly > okay." No real liturgical accompanimental instrument, with an ignorant nerd > at the P.A. potentiometer, and nobody noticing that the visiting = musician > cannot make music.   This is why I am so glad I go to an LCMS Lutheran church where there will never be a praise band. Seems most of the praise band folks are mose interested in how great they can sing/play than helping people focus on Christ (not a popular view I know). I read an article about another Lutheran church :( who is selling their pipe organ due to decreasing membership and financial difficulties. They only use it once a week at = the 8:30 service. The other services use a praise band. Maybe that is part = of the problem. They don't know how lucky they are, we would love a pipe = organ but can't afford one yet. Amy    
(back) Subject: Thanksgiving From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 15:27:46 +0000 (GMT)   --0-41443446-1038929266=3D:64559 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello,     I am a bit late, having had problems with my e-mail....hope you all had a = good Thanksgiving in the USA.   This reminds me of two funny "Harvest Festival" incidents at two churches = here in the UK some years ago.   In the first, I was an eager particpant at the age of twelve, when I was = Head Chorister in the church choir. The Rector (known affectionately as = "The Rectum") was a humourless,bad tempered man. His Sermon adopted the = theme, "The bountiful provider". The church had been fairly smothered = with fruit, flowers and various extraordinary vegetables; which included = the biggest bunch of grapes the world has ever seen, which was delicately = hung around the neck of "the bird". Reaching the climax of his utterly = tedious sermon, the Rectum waved his hand in a theatrical manner and = pointed at the Lectern....."God is indeed good!"   There, for all to see, was the largest "lung" ever hung in public.....not = a single grape was left. The boy choristers, ,myself included, shuffled = around guiltily, looking at feet, the roof supports....in fact anywhere = but into the eyes of the Rector!   But the story which takes the biscuit (or is it the Harvest Loaf?) was the = absurd fate which befell a village organist. For reasons best known to = themselves, the ladies of the church had taken out step-ladders and hung = fruit and vegetables from every possible pier, projection and stone ledge. = This included a display of a potential mass vegetable casserole attached = to the organ case, and which could have fed the whole village twice over.   "Let us begin our Harvest Thanksgiving as we sing our opening hymn", began = the Vicar.   Drawing all the stops (this was a small but thunderous instrument) the = opening notes of "We plough the fields and scatter" pealed out in double = octaves.   In the next instant, the hapless organist was bombarded with a variety of = vegetables when the strings broke. As grapes, oranges, melons, grapefruit, = loaves, tomatoes, marrows and cucumbers bounced around the chancel and = covered the organist with pith, peel and mush; he somehow continued to the = end of the hymn with barely a hesitation.   What a trooper!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-41443446-1038929266=3D:64559 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello,</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>I am a bit late, having had problems with my e-mail....hope you all had = a good Thanksgiving in the USA.</P> <P>This reminds me of&nbsp;two funny "Harvest Festival" incidents at two = churches here in the UK some years ago.</P> <P>In the first, I was an eager particpant at the age of twelve, when I = was Head Chorister in the church choir. The Rector (known affectionately = as "The Rectum") was a humourless,bad tempered man. His Sermon adopted the = theme, "The bountiful provider".&nbsp; The church had been fairly = smothered with fruit, flowers and various extraordinary vegetables; which = included the biggest bunch of grapes the world has ever seen, which was = delicately hung around the neck of "the bird". Reaching the climax of his = utterly tedious sermon, the Rectum waved his hand in a theatrical manner = and pointed at the Lectern....."God is indeed good!"</P> <P>There, for all to see, was the largest "lung" ever hung in = public.....not a single grape was left. The boy choristers, ,myself = included, shuffled around&nbsp;guiltily,&nbsp; looking at feet, the roof = supports....in fact anywhere but into the eyes of the Rector!&nbsp; </P> <P>But the story which takes the biscuit (or is it the Harvest Loaf?) was = the absurd fate which befell a village organist. For reasons best known to = themselves, the ladies of the church had taken out step-ladders and hung = fruit and vegetables from every possible pier, projection and stone ledge. = This included a display of a potential mass vegetable casserole attached to the organ case, and which could have fed the whole village twice = over.</P> <P>"Let us begin our Harvest Thanksgiving as we sing our opening hymn", = began the Vicar.</P> <P>Drawing all the stops (this was a small but thunderous instrument) the = opening notes of "We plough the fields and scatter" pealed out in double = octaves.</P> <P>In the next instant, the hapless organist was bombarded with a variety = of vegetables when the strings broke. As grapes, oranges, melons, = grapefruit, loaves, tomatoes, marrows and cucumbers bounced around the = chancel and covered the organist with pith, peel and mush; he somehow = continued to the end of the hymn with barely a hesitation.</P> <P>What a trooper!</P> <P>Regards,</P> <P>Colin Mitchell UK</P> <P>&nbsp;</P><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-41443446-1038929266=3D:64559--  
(back) Subject: Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 10:56:47 EST     --part1_197.11890db1.2b1e2e3f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Sam:   Rodgers organs need some sort of pipe tracking device to remain steady intune with the pipes. Stretch tuning on the Rodgers needs to be turned off while tuning the pipes. Pipe tracking keeps the electronic components which are stable in tune with the pipes which move with any temperature change. I really don't think it's unstable wind causing what you describe. Install an automatic tracking device to keep the pipes and electronics together.   Ron Severin   --part1_197.11890db1.2b1e2e3f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Sam:<BR> <BR> Rodgers organs need some sort of pipe tracking device to<BR> remain steady intune with the pipes. Stretch tuning on the<BR> Rodgers needs to be turned off while tuning the pipes. Pipe<BR> tracking keeps the electronic components which are stable<BR> in tune with the pipes which move with any temperature change.<BR> I really don't think it's unstable wind causing what you describe.<BR> Install an automatic tracking device to keep the pipes and <BR> electronics together.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_197.11890db1.2b1e2e3f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Shades of H G Wells From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 16:51:09 +0000 (GMT)   --0-2044384362-1038934269=3D:24770 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello, In the recent past, we (well actually "you") had discussions about = authentic Bach performances. Greg wrote:-   > >How bout this, what if we went back then? I bet half of us >or more would choose to stay! I probably would! > >   I tried to reply without success, but I cannot resist sending it now:-   Would this be Bach to the future Greg?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-2044384362-1038934269=3D:24770 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P>In the recent past, we (well actually "you") had discussions about = authentic Bach performances. <P>Greg wrote:-</P> <P>&gt;<BR>&gt;<IT fantastic<br and absurd these creating stop to all you = for time is>How bout this, what if we went back then? I bet half of = us<BR>&gt;or more would choose to stay! I probably would! &gt;<BR>&gt;</P> <P>I tried to reply without success, but I cannot resist sending it = now:-</P> <P>Would this be Bach to the future Greg?</P> <P>Regards,</P> <P>Colin Mitchell UK</P> <P><BR>&nbsp;</P><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-2044384362-1038934269=3D:24770--  
(back) Subject: Advent CDs From: "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 03 Dec 2002 11:32:14 -0500   A friend in the United States has asked my help in finding "classical" music to listen to that has strong Advent messages or implications, as opposed to Christmas, and thus far I've come up with the following:   Bach cantata on "Nun komm, der heiden heiland" cantata on "Wachet Auf" Magnificat   Orlando Gibbons "This Is the Record Of John" as part of a collection = of choral works (Anyone know a good CD that includes this which I could recommend to my friend?)   Is there a current CD of the Advent lessons and carols service at King's College, Cambridge, as opposed to their more famous Christmas service?   In behalf of my friend, thanks for whatever help you can give. Private responses are O.K., unless you think others might value the information = from your response as well.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Shades of H G Wells From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 12:01:35 EST     --part1_1b8.a165266.2b1e3d6f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Colin:   It would be rather interesting if we did have a time machine to go back and snatch old Bach into the future as you suggested. I'll bet there'd be many surprises and reactions from the old boy. This might make an interesting pipe organ related novel. :)   Ron Severin   --part1_1b8.a165266.2b1e3d6f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Colin:<BR> <BR> It would be rather interesting if we did have a time machine<BR> to go back and snatch old Bach into the future as you suggested.<BR> I'll bet there'd be many surprises and reactions from the old boy.<BR> This might make an interesting pipe organ related novel. :)<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1b8.a165266.2b1e3d6f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Who controls the volume? ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!! From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Tue, 03 Dec 2002 11:08:30 -0600   Alan wrote:   > > Steve: I THINK I understand what you're saying. But I'm not sure. A > fuller paragraph or so about it would be welcomed by me. To tip my = hand, > I'm in favor of electronics at a service at the Mexico City Stadium, but = not > (except for recording purposes, or assistance for hard-of-hearing) in = ANY > church seating 1000 or fewer. >   Hi Alan,   I agree almost completely. You certainly shouldn't need to put the organ = through a PA in anything but the largest churches under any circumstances. = The only exception I could foresee would be a non-permanent installation = such as the Mexico City Stadium.   You asked for more explanation. When I was younger I played in rock bands. = The sound check was an integral part of our routine and this was when most = of the sonic balance decisions were made. We checked monitor levels (the = wedge shaped speakers pointed at the singers so they can hear themselves) and levels of = individual voices coming through them. It often took a while to get things = right which made the sound technician reluctant to change anything = significant during the actual gig, other than bringing instruments during solos. However if during the = performance the guitar player turned up his amp the singer would = invariably ask to be turned up in the monitors.   The simple reality is if there's a sound technician get to know him/her, = especially if the organ or keybiard is going through the PA. They can be = your friend or your enemy. I much prefer them as my friend.   This reminds me of an old Far Side cartoon. The carption is something like = "Bernie's last day as sound technician." The picture shows Bernie turning = up the "suck" knob and the audience throwing stuff at the band. Of course = consoles don't have that knob, but it makes the very real point about the control sound = technicians have.   Steve Chandler    
(back) Subject: RE: How to prove a Steady wind supply? From: "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 10:20:16 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DD_01C29AB5.93D89D00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Ron, good point. Unfortunately, there's only a few notes which notable tremble / quiver (rapidly, more than 5-10 changes a second). I'm figuring it's either an unsteady wind supply or the troublesome pipes themselves = are imperfect. At this point, I'd even suspect both, but don't have enough knowledge to tell what is really wrong. --Sam Sam Vause, Chandler, AZ -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of RonSeverin@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2002 8:57 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply?     Dear Sam:   Rodgers organs need some sort of pipe tracking device to remain steady intune with the pipes. Stretch tuning on the Rodgers needs to be turned off while tuning the pipes. Pipe tracking keeps the electronic components which are stable in tune with the pipes which move with any temperature change. I really don't think it's unstable wind causing what you describe. Install an automatic tracking device to keep the pipes and electronics together.   Ron Severin   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DD_01C29AB5.93D89D00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2719.2200" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D564081817-03122002><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>Ron,=3D20 good point. Unfortunately, there's only a few notes which notable =3D tremble /=3D20 quiver (rapidly, more than 5-10 changes a second). I'm figuring it's =3D either an=3D20 unsteady wind supply or the troublesome pipes themselves are imperfect. = =3D At this=3D20 point, I'd even suspect both, but don't have enough knowledge to tell =3D what is=3D20 really wrong.&nbsp;</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff>--</FONT><FONT = face=3D3DGaramond=3D20 color=3D3D#0000ff>Sam</FONT> <BR><FONT face=3D3DGaramond = color=3D3D#800080>Sam =3D Vause,=3D20 Chandler, AZ</FONT> </DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3D3Dltr align=3D3Dleft><FONT =3D face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of=3D20 </B>RonSeverin@aol.com<BR><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, December 03, 2002 8:57 = =3D   AM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: How to =3D prove a=3D20 Steady wind supply?<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT =3D face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT=3D20 lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">Dear =3D Sam:<BR><BR>Rodgers organs=3D20 need some sort of pipe tracking device to<BR>remain steady intune with = =3D the=3D20 pipes. Stretch tuning on the<BR>Rodgers needs to be turned off while =3D tuning=3D20 the pipes. Pipe<BR>tracking keeps the electronic components which = are=3D20 stable<BR>in tune with the pipes which move with any temperature =3D change.<BR>I=3D20 really don't think it's unstable wind causing what you =3D describe.<BR>Install an=3D20 automatic tracking device to keep the pipes and <BR>electronics=3D20 together.<BR><BR>Ron Severin</FONT> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DD_01C29AB5.93D89D00--    
(back) Subject: Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 12:57:41 EST     --part1_38.32177293.2b1e4a95_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Sam:   What you are expressing now is a voicing problem with the affected pipes. It may not show up for a long time, but slivers of metal from the original voicing process hang on by a thread and work their way eventually to disturb the wind sheet. This could be in the toes of the pipes, or the upper lip. This can cause all sorts of unsteadiness in the speech. It could be a languid that's dropped a bit, or a sliver of metal there too. it takes some investigating to determine the cause. It could be that in packing pipes, upper or lower lips have moved slightly. An expert voicer can fix these in a few minutes.   Slivers in the toes can cause uneven wind to the lower lip and languid in a V shape more at the sides and less in the middle. This can develop years down the road, and it could be as simple as that. The sliver can wiggle too causing the pipe to tremulate.   If it were unsteady wind all of the pipes would sound strange and tremulate out of tune.   Ron Severin   --part1_38.32177293.2b1e4a95_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Sam:<BR> <BR> What you are expressing now is a voicing problem with the <BR> affected pipes. It may not show up for a long time, but slivers<BR> of metal from the original voicing process hang on by a thread<BR> and work their way eventually to disturb the wind sheet. This<BR> could be in the toes of the pipes, or the upper lip. This can<BR> cause all sorts of unsteadiness in the speech. It could be<BR> a languid that's dropped a bit, or a sliver of metal there too.<BR> it takes some investigating to determine the cause. It could<BR> be that in packing pipes, upper or lower lips have moved slightly.<BR> An expert voicer can fix these in a few minutes.<BR> <BR> Slivers in the toes can cause uneven wind to the lower lip and<BR> languid in a V shape more at the sides and less in the middle.<BR> This can develop years down the road, and it could be as simple<BR> as that. The sliver can wiggle too causing the pipe to tremulate.<BR> <BR> If it were unsteady wind all of the pipes would sound strange and<BR> tremulate out of tune.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_38.32177293.2b1e4a95_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Who controls the volume? ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!! From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 13:11:52 -0500   > That sound "engineer" would turn the volume down on me > one time. I would turn the organ off and walk out of > the church. There are too many churches looking for > organists to put up with crap like that.   It would infuriate me, too, but I'd try and count to ten and keep my cool = as I tell him calmly but firmly that I know he means well but it won't do. = And if he is not the only "sound engineer" I'd propose that a big piece of = duct tape should go over whatever knob or knobs are involved (if it is as = simple as that, which it probably isn't-- answering ignorance and high-handedness with more of the same probably isn't the answer). I don't know if I could keep my patience for as long as it takes to say that, but I'd try.   The second time, I'd probably walk out as you say.      
(back) Subject: RE: How to prove a Steady wind supply? From: "Sam Vause" <vause@cox.net> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 11:31:46 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00E6_01C29ABF.908FF620 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Ah, ha! This sounds quite reasonable. I'll drag out my fiber optic light = and have a look in the feet.... --Sam Sam Vause, Chandler, AZ -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of RonSeverin@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2002 10:58 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: How to prove a Steady wind supply?     Dear Sam:   What you are expressing now is a voicing problem with the affected pipes. It may not show up for a long time, but slivers of metal from the original voicing process hang on by a thread and work their way eventually to disturb the wind sheet. This could be in the toes of the pipes, or the upper lip. This can cause all sorts of unsteadiness in the speech. It could be a languid that's dropped a bit, or a sliver of metal there too. it takes some investigating to determine the cause. It could be that in packing pipes, upper or lower lips have moved slightly. An expert voicer can fix these in a few minutes.   Slivers in the toes can cause uneven wind to the lower lip and languid in a V shape more at the sides and less in the middle. This can develop years down the road, and it could be as simple as that. The sliver can wiggle too causing the pipe to tremulate.   If it were unsteady wind all of the pipes would sound strange and tremulate out of tune.   Ron Severin   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00E6_01C29ABF.908FF620 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2719.2200" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D665173118-03122002><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>Ah,=3D20 ha! This sounds quite reasonable. I'll drag out my fiber optic light and = =3D have a=3D20 look in the feet....</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial color=3D3D#0000ff>--</FONT><FONT = face=3D3DGaramond=3D20 color=3D3D#0000ff>Sam</FONT> <BR><FONT face=3D3DGaramond = color=3D3D#800080>Sam =3D Vause,=3D20 Chandler, AZ</FONT> </DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3D3Dltr align=3D3Dleft><FONT =3D face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of=3D20 </B>RonSeverin@aol.com<BR><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, December 03, 2002 =3D 10:58=3D20 AM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: How to =3D prove a=3D20 Steady wind supply?<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT =3D face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT=3D20 lang=3D3D0 face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF">Dear =3D Sam:<BR><BR>What you are=3D20 expressing now is a voicing problem with the <BR>affected pipes. It =3D may not=3D20 show up for a long time, but slivers<BR>of metal from the original =3D voicing=3D20 process hang on by a thread<BR>and work their way eventually to =3D disturb the=3D20 wind sheet. This<BR>could be in the toes of the pipes, or the upper =3D lip. This=3D20 can<BR>cause all sorts of unsteadiness in the speech. It could be<BR>a = =3D languid=3D20 that's dropped a bit, or a sliver of metal there too.<BR>it takes some = =3D   investigating to determine the cause. It could<BR>be that in packing =3D pipes,=3D20 upper or lower lips have moved slightly.<BR>An expert voicer can fix =3D these in=3D20 a few minutes.<BR><BR>Slivers in the toes can cause uneven wind to the = =3D lower=3D20 lip and<BR>languid in a V shape more at the sides and less in the=3D20 middle.<BR>This can develop years down the road, and it could be as=3D20 simple<BR>as that. The sliver can wiggle too causing the pipe to=3D20 tremulate.<BR><BR>If it were unsteady wind all of the pipes would =3D sound=3D20 strange and<BR>tremulate out of tune.<BR><BR>Ron Severin</FONT>=3D20 </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00E6_01C29ABF.908FF620--    
(back) Subject: RE: Who controls the volume? ARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!! From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 13:46:37 -0500   On 11/30/02 3:31 PM, "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> wrote:   > I would much rather have an organist who might not be able to play all > of the "fancy stuff", but is a committed Christian, and can still handle > singing of hymns/liturgies --- as opposed to an organist who can "do it > all" but has no concern for the purpose of worship.   So would I, and I have had the privilege of knowing enough of them to see = a couple other points they have in common:   (1) Their playing, like all their other work, is solid, and their taste is impeccable.   (2) They are patient people but also territorial, detesting officious intrusion into their responsibilities, and they do not allow themselves to be doormats. Ultimately, they would rather resign than be forced to make what they consider an unworthy offering. That is part of their Christian commitment, whereas someone who didn't = have any would just obey orders, grin, and bear it as long as he gets his = monthly check.