PipeChat Digest #3276 - Wednesday, December 4, 2002
 
Re: bellows for reed organ
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Schwimmers and pneumatics.
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Subject: Amy and a Pipe Organ
  by "Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Novelty value
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Victorian note values
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Victorian note values
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: bellows for reed organ From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 06:28:35 -0600   >HI, Can anyone give me some information on where to have a reed organ( >melodeon) restored in the Chicago area? This is for a friend and she = wants >to have it looked after. Gary   Gary   You might have better luck asking this question through the Reed Organ Society. They have a web site at: http://www.reedsoc.org/ and they also have an email list such as this one. i would give them a try.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 06:49:10 -0600     --------------35F494D66F663E387946B9E8 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have experienced/witnessed this in two situations. A friend of mine had on-going problems with any digital keyboard at her school - changing sounds in the middle of a song, activating the demo without pushing the button - until I told her about our experience at my church with our digital organ. When our organ was new, I had several episodes of "cyphers" - no notes were stuck down - but notes or clusters would just play randomly. I consulted the installer and the manual and found - you must plug these things into dedicated electrical outlets. Our organ was sharing its circuit with the sound system. The same way electrical surges and stray electrical feedback can make garbage on the screen and interference on a computer screen or television screen - a digital keyboard's output is sound. So, the electical garbage comes out as sound. When we put in a new circuit and when my friend got a power strip with surge protection AND used a different outlet - the problem went away.   So - get the custodian to get you a good extension cord and run it to an outlet that is (hopefully) on a circuit that nothing else is currently plugged into - and perhaps your problem will go away.   Margo   l2nn@juno.com wrote:   > Here's a true story. Ironically, this story may happen again this > week since I have to use this Clavinova for the Messiah and I wonder > if anyone else has had this problem with them... Two years ago in a > Messiah rehearsal, we had a 16-piece orchestra and we were using a > Yamaha Clavinova as the harpsichord. As a local church with a small > budget for this event, it's all we could do. A parishioner's loaned > harpsichord was horribly out of tune and in need of work; we had to > return it to her and not use it. The Clavinova resides at the > rector's home so it was carried over and placed on the altar behind > the cellos. The Director of Music was the conductor that year. I was > busy playing some part of the Messiah in our one rehearsal, and all of > a sudden, I heard a boogie-woogie demo come streaming out of this > Clavinova! I remember the whole orchestra turned and stared at me > when the boogie-woogie demo took over in the midst of "And He Shall > Purify...". The director looked at me, furious, and demanded to know > what had happened. Everyone thought it was funny but no one laughed > because of the director's fury. I raised both arms in the air as if > the police had ordered me to put my hands in the air and said, "I > didn't do it". The boogie-woogie continued for a little while because > it took the director awhile to get over to me as he struggled to run > between oboists, bassoonists, and cellos and their music stands. He > came over and defiantly turned the Clavinova off...and then turned it > back on and marched back to his podium. I said, "Why didn't you tell > me it had this glitch and that I just had to turn it off?!" But I > don't think the director knew the idiosyncrasies of the rector's > Clavinova. Each year now the men in the church choir, only the men, > approach me in my flowing black dress on the night of the concert and > want to bet money with me whether the rector's Clavinova will lapse > into its default demo. You can tell they secretly hope it will. And I > secretly yearn that the rector's Clavinova will spontaneously burst > into its boogie-woogie demo also...I could profit by it.... I just > can't decide where the best place would be...I guess I'll wait and > hear the soloists during rehearsal... My conscience fights with me > whether to tell the new conductor about this potential glitch...or > maybe I won't... Lynn FineganAssociate OrganistOrinda, CA   --------------35F494D66F663E387946B9E8 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bottomMargin=3D"0" leftMargin=3D"3" topMargin=3D"0" rightMargin=3D"3"> I have experienced/witnessed this in two situations.&nbsp; A friend of mine had on-going problems with any digital keyboard at her school - = changing sounds in the middle of a song, activating the demo without pushing the button - until I told her about our experience at my church with our = digital organ.&nbsp; When our organ was new, I had several episodes of "cyphers" - no notes were stuck down - but notes or clusters would just play = randomly.&nbsp; I consulted the installer and the manual and found - you must plug these things into dedicated electrical outlets.&nbsp; Our organ was sharing its circuit with the sound system.&nbsp; The same way electrical surges and stray electrical feedback can make garbage on the screen and interference on a computer screen or television screen - a digital keyboard's output is sound.&nbsp; So, the electical garbage comes out as sound.&nbsp; When we put in a new circuit and when my friend got a power strip with surge protection AND used a different outlet - the problem went away. <p>So - get the custodian to get you a good extension cord and run it to an outlet that is (hopefully) on a circuit that nothing else is currently plugged into - and perhaps your problem will go away. <p>Margo <p>l2nn@juno.com wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE>&nbsp;Here's a true story.&nbsp; Ironically, this story may happen again this week since I have to use this Clavinova for the Messiah and I wonder if anyone else has had this problem with = them...&nbsp;Two years ago in a Messiah rehearsal, we had a 16-piece orchestra and we were using a Yamaha Clavinova as the harpsichord.&nbsp; As a local church with a small budget for this event, it's all we could do.&nbsp; A parishioner's loaned harpsichord was horribly out of tune and in need of work; we had to return it to her and not use it.&nbsp; The Clavinova resides at the rector's home so it was carried over and placed on the altar behind the cellos.&nbsp; The Director of Music was the conductor that year.&nbsp; I was busy playing some part of the Messiah in our one rehearsal, and all of a sudden, I heard a boogie-woogie demo come streaming out of this = Clavinova!&nbsp; I remember the whole orchestra turned and stared at me when the = boogie-woogie demo took over in the midst of "And He Shall Purify...".&nbsp; The = director looked at me, furious, and demanded to know what had happened.&nbsp; = Everyone thought it was funny but no one laughed because of the director's = fury.&nbsp; I raised both arms in the air as if the police had ordered me to put my hands in the air and said, "I didn't do it".&nbsp; The boogie-woogie = continued for a little while because it took the director awhile to get over to me as he struggled to run between oboists, bassoonists, and cellos and their music stands.&nbsp; He came over and defiantly turned the Clavinova = off...and then turned it back on and marched back to his podium.&nbsp; I said, "Why didn't you tell me it had this glitch and that I just had to turn it = off?!"&nbsp; But I don't think the director knew the idiosyncrasies of the rector's Clavinova.&nbsp; Each year now the men in the church choir, <i>only the men</i>, approach me in my flowing black dress on the night of the concert and want to bet money with me whether the rector's Clavinova will lapse into its default demo. You can tell they secretly hope it will.&nbsp; And I secretly yearn that the rector's Clavinova will spontaneously burst into its boogie-woogie demo also...I could profit by it....&nbsp; I just can't decide where the best place would be...I guess I'll wait and hear the = soloists during rehearsal...&nbsp;My conscience fights with me whether to tell the new conductor about this potential glitch...or maybe I won't...&nbsp;Lynn FineganAssociate OrganistOrinda, CA</blockquote>   </body> </html>   --------------35F494D66F663E387946B9E8--    
(back) Subject: Re: Clavinova disrupts Messiah rehearsal From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 07:49:35 -0600   I have a Kurzweil with weighted keys that I take to gigs on the road, so = to speak. And it also has a pretty good harpsichord sound - woudn't pass in = a solo concert, but a good fake in a continuo setting. The problem I fight = with it is physical - when my ears hear harpsichord, my arms and hands = automatically change techniques and start playing without arm-weight. Before long it = becomes painful. I have great difficulty playing the "harpsichord" with piano technique. But I find I have to be constantly aware, or I really could = strain things. If I just play and ignore it, I am sore for some time afterwards. (And when I play with organ sound, I have to keep reminding my left hand = that it has to play my feet's part. Oh, well - maybe it is just my weak = mind.....) But it might be something to think about if any of you find your arms sore after playing other sounds on piano-weighted keys.   Margo   Paul Opel wrote:   > ...Clavinova- it worked pretty well. What was odd was having this decent > harpsichord sound come while playing piano-weighted keys. ...   > Paul >    
(back) Subject: Re: Schwimmers and pneumatics. From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 07:53:22 -0600   Why would anyone want something from a totally different system a part of an organ mechanism...that sounds like 19th cent. Rube Goldberg stuff..yeh, (I know he was 20th cent, but what the heck).   Also, placement of a blower in a remote area only leads to tuning instability and possible contamination of organ/parts, etc.   Just an observation before I fly back out the door.     jon bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Subject: Amy and a Pipe Organ From: "Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 08:16:12 -0600   Thank you Greg and Dennis for your reply. I guess the reason I joined = this list was so I could learn about them and assist in making a reasonable decision about what to get if the chance to get a pipe organ should arise. Amy Fleming Harrison, Arkansas    
(back) Subject: Novelty value From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 14:21:49 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1997724869-1039011709=3D:51117 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello, I suspect that Franz Liszt would be much more interesting......good looks, = interesting hair style,phenomenal technique, a cameo role for Paganini, = drugs, parties, womanising and all cloaked in religious piety. A definite best seller! Regards, Colin Mitchel UK RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:Dear Colin:   It would be rather interesting if we did have a time machine to go back and snatch old Bach into the future as you suggested. I'll bet there'd be many surprises and reactions from the old boy. This might make an interesting pipe organ related novel. :)   Ron Severin       --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1997724869-1039011709=3D:51117 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P>&nbsp; <P>I suspect that Franz Liszt would be much more interesting......good = looks, interesting hair style,phenomenal technique, a cameo role for = Paganini, drugs,&nbsp;parties, womanising and all&nbsp;cloaked in = religious piety. <P>&nbsp;A definite best seller! <P>Regards, <P>&nbsp; <P>Colin Mitchel UK <P>&nbsp;<B><I>RonSeverin@aol.com</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT face=3DArial = lang=3D0 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF">Dear Colin:<BR><BR>It would be = rather interesting if we did have a time machine<BR>to go back and snatch = old Bach into the future as you suggested.<BR>I'll bet there'd be many = surprises and reactions from the old boy.<BR>This might make an = interesting pipe organ related novel. :)<BR><BR>Ron Severin</FONT> = </BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-1997724869-1039011709=3D:51117--  
(back) Subject: Victorian note values From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 15:30:21 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1278266999-1039015821=3D:85830 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello,   I think I must be serious! Paul makes an interesting point about the impossibility of appreciating = music by people who, to paraphrase, "toil and labour in difficult = circumstances". I cannot speak for America, but the in the UK there was the exact opposite = phenomenon. Music was THE leisure pursuit above all others, and one which = was not restricted to the comfortable middle classes. Perhaps I should go off at a tangent and avoid dry, dusty = facts............. My late uncle was a milk-farmer who's day began at 4am, when he would tend = a substantial herd, process the milk, bottle it and then deliver it after = hitching "Bobbin" up to the Cart. Many hours later, after trudging up and = down pathways and steep streets, he would arrive home exhausted, un-hitch = "Bobbin", wash the cart, clear off the empty bottles and wash them. Then = he would put "Bobbin" in his stable, brush him down, feed him and then eat = a meal and catch an hour's sleep before walking 2 miles down to the = Methodist Chapel for choir rehearsals held three times a week. He was a = good and proud family man who had a heart of gold, but he was also a very = strong and tough-minded man with a sharply focused concept of morality and = religious values. But my uncle was much, much more than a mere Chapel Chorister. In fact, he = was a very celebrated Bass soloist in Yorkshire; travelling far and wide = to sing awesome performances of "Messiah" of which people still speak and = old folk remember to this day. He was not just a good singer...... he was = outstanding. Many is the time when he shared the solo arias and the platform with = singers of such calibre as Isobelle Bailey and Kathleen Ferrier; to name = but two. But this was not exceptional in this part of the world.....the standard = was fantastic! Go back to the last century to the start of the Brass Band tradition. = Every mill and every coal mine (or so it seemed) had its own Brass or = Silver Band; the same also true of the Salvation Army and even whole = villages. Most remarkable of all were the legends of Brass such as the = "Grimethorpe Colliery Band", "Black Dyke Mills Band" and the "Co-operative = Band".......names which are still in the folk-lore of the area. Indeed, as = recently as 1975 (or thereabouts), Andre Previn conducted the awesome = "Black Dyke" and, in a revealing moment, said, "I just wish I had brass = players like this in the London Symphony Orchestra". THESE WERE ORDINARY = WORKING MEN! The standard of Brass playing still remains very, very high in the UK, = with regular competitions which are fought with determination and at some = sacrifice. The organ builder John Clough in the UK, was the principal Euphonium = player for the "Black Dyke Band".....his name remains a legend in Brass = circles, but HE would never consider himself exceptional....just a typical = modest bandsman in fact. Well....perhaps this doesn't properly answer the question which Paul = raises, but it does give a glimpse of musical life in the North of England = covering the period 1930 to the present day. Were we to go back a hundred = and twenty years, when life expectancy was maybe 40-50 years, there is = evidence to suggest that the standard of music making was just as = high.....especially the choral tradition in every conceivable chapel, = church, cathedral and collegiate foundation. Furthemore, EVERY house had a = piano, and Sunday Evening was the special time that families gathered = around , just as the Bach family did, to sing hymns, songs and hear solos = from anyone who cared to play them.....usually the lady of the house or = the children. If I could choose to go "Bach to the future", it would to witness a Bach = family gathering on Sunday....... C P E at the Harpsichord, W F with his = Violin, all the other little Bachs and "Dad" smoking a pipe or placing a = freshly written "Secular Cantata" on the music desk. Then someone would say, "Come on Dad! Why don't you improvise for us!" Now THAT is a quality family life! Regards, Colin Mitchell UK....who works 70 hours a week and plays Reger!               "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote: Greg wrote:-   > > How bout this, what if we went back then? I bet half of us >or more would choose to stay! I probably would! > >   Colin wrote:   I tried to reply without success, but I cannot resist sending it now:-   Would this be Bach to the future Greg?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   ------------------------------------------------   I often say that I consider my fascination with computers to be a consolation prize for having been born about a century too late.   But seriously, we have no conception of how dismal and laborious daily = life was for the vast majority of people in those days-- even if you were well-enough off to have a servant or two. Most people, of course, didn't have servants, and many *were* servants. Music was a great luxury; you never heard it unless someone were making it in real time near you. Does anyone know what psychological and anthropolical studies have been done to identify and explain any relationship between life circumstances and capacity to appreciate fine music? It may be that most people with rough, hard lives *cannot* appreciate it, as a sort of defense mechanism, because the contrast between such beauty and the ugliness of their general = existence would be unbearable. I'd like to think that this is not so, but to assume that plunking myself down in eighteenth-century Leipzig would enable me = even to hear Bach's music, let alone love it, is more like playing Russian roulette than I want to consider.   Colin has probably seen the museum of Victorian life in-- what northern = city is it? York, I think. Or maybe we've seen documentary series like "Victorian house" or "Frontier house." They found a few things to like, = but ultimately the participants were glad when the experiment ended and they could return to modern life styles.       > -----Original Message----- > From: Colin Mitchell [SMTP:cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk] > Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2002 11:51 AM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: RE: Shades of H G Wells > > Hello, > > In the recent past, we (well actually "you") had discussions about > authentic Bach performances. > > Greg wrote:- > > > > > > How bout this, what if we went back then? I bet half of us > >or more would choose to stay! I probably would! > > > > > I tried to reply without success, but I cannot resist sending it now:- > > Would this be Bach to the future Greg? > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > > _____ > > With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits > your needs > > age.html> >   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1278266999-1039015821=3D:85830 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P> <P>I think I must be serious! <P>Paul makes an interesting point about the impossibility of appreciating = music&nbsp;by people who, to paraphrase, "toil and labour in difficult = circumstances". <P>I cannot speak for America, but the in the UK there was the exact = opposite phenomenon. Music was THE leisure pursuit above all others, and = one which was not restricted to the comfortable middle classes. <P>Perhaps I should go off at a tangent and avoid dry, dusty = facts............. <P>My late uncle was a milk-farmer who's day began at 4am, when he = would&nbsp;tend a substantial herd, process the milk, bottle it and then = deliver it after hitching "Bobbin" up to the Cart. Many hours later, after = trudging up and down pathways and steep streets, he would arrive home = exhausted,&nbsp;un-hitch "Bobbin", wash the cart, clear off the empty bottles and wash them. Then he would put "Bobbin" in his stable, = brush him down, feed him and then eat a meal and&nbsp; catch an hour's = sleep before walking 2 miles down to the Methodist Chapel for choir = rehearsals held three times a week. He was a good and proud family man who = had a heart of gold, but he was also a very strong and tough-minded man = with a sharply focused concept of morality and religious values. <P>But my uncle was much, much more than a mere Chapel Chorister. In fact, = he was a very celebrated Bass soloist in Yorkshire; travelling far and = wide to sing awesome performances of "Messiah" of which people still speak = and old folk remember to this day. He was not just a good singer...... he = was outstanding. <P>Many is the time when he shared the solo arias and the platform with = singers of&nbsp;such calibre&nbsp;as Isobelle Bailey and Kathleen Ferrier; = to name but two. <P>But this was not exceptional in this part of the world.....the standard = was fantastic! <P>Go back to the last century to the start of the Brass Band tradition. = Every mill and every coal mine (or so it seemed) had its own Brass or = Silver Band; the same also true of the Salvation Army and even whole = villages. Most remarkable of all were the legends of Brass such as the = "Grimethorpe Colliery Band", "Black Dyke Mills Band" and the "Co-operative = Band".......names which are still in the folk-lore of the area. Indeed, as = recently as 1975 (or thereabouts), Andre Previn conducted the awesome = "Black Dyke" and, in a revealing moment, said, "I just wish I had brass = players like this in the London Symphony Orchestra".&nbsp; THESE WERE = ORDINARY WORKING MEN! <P>The standard of Brass playing still remains very, very high in the UK, = with regular competitions which are fought with determination and at some = sacrifice. <P>The organ builder John Clough in the UK, was the principal Euphonium = player for&nbsp;the "Black Dyke Band".....his name remains a legend in = Brass circles, but HE would never consider himself exceptional....just a = typical modest bandsman in fact. <P>Well....perhaps this doesn't properly answer the question which Paul = raises, but it does give a glimpse of musical life in the North of England = covering the period 1930 to the present day. Were we to go back a hundred = and twenty years, when life expectancy was maybe 40-50 years, there is = evidence to suggest that the standard of music making was just as = high.....especially the choral tradition in every conceivable chapel, = church, cathedral and collegiate foundation. Furthemore, EVERY house had a = piano, and Sunday Evening was the special time that families gathered = around , just as the Bach family did, to sing hymns, songs and hear solos = from anyone who cared to play them.....usually the lady of the house or = the children. <P>If I could choose to go "Bach to the future", it would to witness a = Bach family gathering on Sunday....... C P E at the Harpsichord, W F with = his Violin, all the other little Bachs and "Dad" smoking a pipe or placing = a freshly written "Secular Cantata" on the music desk. <P>Then someone would say, "Come on Dad! Why don't you improvise for us!" <P>Now THAT is a quality family life! <P>Regards, <P> <P>Colin Mitchell UK....who works 70 hours a week and plays Reger! <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P> <P>&nbsp;<B><I>"Emmons, Paul" &lt;pemmons@wcupa.edu&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Greg wrote:-<BR><BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>How bout this, what = if we went back then? I bet half of us<BR>&gt;or more would choose to = stay! I probably would! &gt;<BR>&gt;<BR><BR>Colin wrote:<BR><BR>I tried to = reply without success, but I cannot resist sending it now:-<BR><BR>Would = this be Bach to the future Greg?<BR><BR>Regards,<BR><BR>Colin Mitchell = UK<BR><BR>------------------------------------------------<BR><BR>I often = say that I consider my fascination with computers to be a<BR>consolation = prize for having been born about a century too late.<BR><BR>But seriously, = we have no conception of how dismal and laborious daily life<BR>was for the vast majority of people in = those days-- even if you were<BR>well-enough off to have a servant or two. = Most people, of course, didn't<BR>have servants, and many *were* servants. = Music was a great luxury; you<BR>never heard it unless someone were making = it in real time n --0-1278266999-1039015821=3D:85830--  
(back) Subject: RE: Victorian note values From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2002 11:01:19 -0500   Thank you, Colin, for reminding me of these counterexamples to my = suggestion (which, as I said, I *want* to see refuted).   There is also the whole choral society movement, which was especially = strong in the industrial north of England. Weren't all those huge town halls = with huge organs built mainly to house performances by large choirs of working-class folk?   I saw and heard an annual ingathering of brass bands when I visited Durham = a few summers ago. There were a great parade through the city and a special service in the cathedral with over a dozen bands participating. Yes, the standard of playing was high.   Here in central-east Pennsylvania, we have a survival of the same institutions, I suppose, in two famous groups: the Allentown Band and the Bethlehem Bach Choir. Both cities are or were heavily industrial.