PipeChat Digest #3280 - Friday, December 6, 2002
 
Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music
  by "Martin Dyde" <martin.dyde@hauptwerk.co.uk>
Need microphone recommendations for recording organs
  by "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com>
Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Steinmeyer, was translation help
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Passau Cathedral (was: Translation help needed)
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Steinmeyer sound out of Fashion?
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Steinmeyer/acoustics
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Steinmeyer/acoustics
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
German romantic organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music From: "Martin Dyde" <martin.dyde@hauptwerk.co.uk> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 11:02:30 -0000   John,   There have been some very interesting discussions on this topic on eorg-l = recently, with a few weighty and very informative essays from Dick Burt and others.   I recommend having a look through their archives from around 18/11/02 - 20= /11/02. The URL is http://www.gulfcst.com/eorg-l/default.html .   Personally, I wouldn't think that you get microphones for $100 that would = be up to the job, but I might be wrong. I use Rode NT2s, which seem to be pretty good,= and cost about UK =A3300 each. I've been using them to sample organs for a virtual= organ project of mine ( http://www.hauptwerk.co.uk/ if you're interested ).   All the best, Martin Dyde.  
(back) Subject: Need microphone recommendations for recording organs From: "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 03:18:19 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01C29CD6.1FFE0230 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I am in the market for a couple of decent microphones that I can use to record a large pipe organ for my juries and then use in my piano studio with my students. I wish I had $1,000s to spend on a pair of great mics but alas the budget of a musician needs to be economical / wise / cheap. I am not planning to use these mics for amplification only for digital recordings.   Anyone got a recommendation?     JJ     ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01C29CD6.1FFE0230 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html>   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <meta name=3D3DGenerator content=3D3D"Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">   <style> <!-- /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} span.EmailStyle17 {font-family:Arial; color:windowtext;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3D3DEN-US link=3D3Dblue vlink=3D3Dpurple>   <div class=3D3DSection1>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>I am in the market for a couple of decent microphones = =3D that I can use to record a large pipe organ for my juries and then use in my =3D piano studio with my students.&nbsp; I wish I had $1,000s to spend on a pair =3D of great mics but alas the budget of a musician needs to be economical / wise / cheap. = =3D I am not planning to use these mics for amplification only for digital =3D recordings.</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>Anyone got a recommendation?</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>JJ</span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000C_01C29CD6.1FFE0230--    
(back) Subject: Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 11:20:47 -0000   This is not a specific recommendation, but rather a plea for some sound (*!*) advice on recording large pipe organs in large and resonant spaces.   I have just acquired some recordings of the excellent and historic St George's Hall, Liverpool, organ. They are a complete muddle. The resonance is so pervasive that the original sound is almost completely lost in the confused echos. It doesn't sound at all like this in the flesh, I suspect because the human ear can separate original sound and 'after sound' from clues like phase and direction, and when these clues are lost in the recording process, then the result is confusion. I have the same problem with some recordings of the the multi-purpose Compton in Southhamton Guilhall and in St. Paul's Cathedral, London. (I can't conceive that there would be any added reverb, no-one in their right mind would want to do = this in these buildings).   How are successful recordings made in these circumstances ? Narrow-beam directional mics to cut down the amount of indirect sound ? Close-up mics plus distance mics with judicious after mixing ? Or are there some other clever wheezes to get round this problem ?   I hope this may generate some opinions on organ recordings which are very good (or very bad) in this respect. It would be interesting to compare recordings of the same organ with different microphone arrangements.   Bruce Miles     ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com> To: <rodgersorgan@freelists.org>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, December 05, 2002 11:43 PM Subject: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music     > I am in the market to purchase a couple of decent microphones for > recording pipe organ music and also will use them in my piano studio. > Does anyone have a recommendation for microphones to handle digital > recordings of a large pipe organ all the way down to an intimate chamber > setting of piano. I do not want to spend much more than $100 per mic > and would appreciate any recommendation you may have. >    
(back) Subject: Steinmeyer, was translation help From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 07:13:49 -0600   Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today?   I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.     Jon Bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Passau Cathedral (was: Translation help needed) From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 14:15:53 +0100 (CET)   Hi Mike et al.,   I have the feeling that there might have occured a little misunderstanding. The website you mentioned shows the Steinmeyer at the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim, Norway. As I understand, this organ was probably on of the largest, if not the largest, Steinmeyer ever built.   The origin of the organ(s) at Passau Cathedral was certainly Steinmeyer. I'm talking abiut the gallery organs (the "Hauptorgel", the "Evangeliums Orgel" and the "Epistel Orgel"). But since the main recostruction by Eisenbarth in Passau, and adding the choir- and celestial organ, it cannot be characterized any longer as "a steinmeyer" (my opinion).   Anyway, the sound is beautiful (at least I found it beautiful, when Felix performed there in August 2000). But you might wish to ask Paul Jacobs and Fred Swann about their opinion. As to my knowledge, they had performed in Passau recently (this year).   Hans-Friedrich Hell   Mike Gettelman schrieb: > Hi Colin, > Here is the best related site I know about, which > includes the history of additions, the current > specifications, and a helpful diagram showing the > placement of the organs. > http://www.hf.ntnu.no/mus/org/nidarosdomen/steinm-e.htm > > Mike > > Colin Mitchell wrote: > > > Hello, > > > > I have the full specification for the astonishing > > Steinmeyer 5-manual instrument at Passau. > > > > Problem is, it will take just ages to set it all out. > > (200 + stops) > > > > If push comes to shove, I can do it, but I wonder if > > anyone knows a quicker source? > > > > The organ certainly makes a wonderful noise...perhaps > > a bit out of fashion these days, but wonderful none > > the less. > > > > Regards, > > > > > > > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 07:59:46 -0600   Steinmeyer's work heavily influenced G. Donald Harrison, and the sound is in some ways reminiscent of Aeolian-Skinner organs of the 1935-1950 period. The best example of Steinmeyer's work in North America is the 3-78 at the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament in Altoona, Pennsylvania, which Columbia Organ Works restored when I was one of their directors back in the late 1980's. The church has spectacular acoustics. Large scales, high tin pipework, careful control at the pipe toe (no open toe voicing), low cut-ups, almost no nicking. Great chorus based on 16' and two 8' Diapasons (No. 1 Diap. being scale 40) up to a six rank mixture and five rank sharp mixture, with scales carried right up to the mixtures. All on 4" wind. What a sound! Peter Sykes has done a Raven CD of Reger played on the instrument, which is available from the OHS if still available. There is also a slightly smaller but very fine Steinmeyer organ in the R.C. Cathedral in Hamilton, Ontario.   John Speller   jon bertschinger wrote: > > Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise > (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. > Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today? > > I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.  
(back) Subject: Steinmeyer sound out of Fashion? From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 08:15:10 -0600   jon bertschinger wrote: > Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise > (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. > Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today? > I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder. I too am curious as to what is meant by this remark. I have a recording of this instrument that I've listened to. Both the space and the instrument are HUGE so obviously, the sound is NOT going to be small and intimate.   Moreover, a few years ago, I had opportunity to crawl through and listen to the wonderful Steinmeyer instrument in the Altoona, PA Cathedral. The instrument is nothing short of astonishing, especially given the time-period in which it was built. Given the dark political cloud hanging over Germany during this time-period, it's a wonder that anything musical at all could be created there; much less exported and installed in this country!   Many of the stops were YEARS in advance of what G.D. Harrison, who was the "Pioneer" of the Organ Reform Movement was doing in 1931. Places like the Groton School were yet to come, and it would be interesting to know how this organ may have impacted Harrison's thinking.   Charles Callahan refers to this instrument in his book "The American Classic Organ; a history in letters". He indicated that such luminaries as Senator Emerson Richards and Henry Willis (3? -book not at hand!) visited the organ, but seemed to somewhat dismiss the organ as "radical". I cannot help but wonder if part of their negative perception was due to the unfinished (bare concrete walls) of the Cathedral when the organ opened and that they were more influenced by the surroundings, rather than the organ itself?   A very interesting subject to me, given my penchant to the German Romantic musical idiom!   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Steinmeyer/acoustics From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 10:17:39 -0500   There is also a slightly smaller but very fine Steinmeyer organ in the R.C. Cathedral in Hamilton, Ontario.   John Speller   And that organ is quite unspectacular because the acoustics of the = cathedral are terrible for an organ. A friend, who has an organ of his own making installed in his church, will be moving it after Christmas to a new church building constructed to accommodate a larger congregation. He was very concerned about the acoustics in the new "auditorium" during = the design phase and badgered the architect into promising at least 2.5 = seconds reverb. The architect told my friend that he had never been asked to consider acoustics in his entire career. The architect had been involved with the design of over 60 churches!! AjM      
(back) Subject: Re: Steinmeyer/acoustics From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 09:13:05 -0600   Andrew Mead wrote:   > The architect told my friend that he had never been asked to > consider acoustics in his entire career. The architect had been > involved with the design of over 60 churches!!   That's because most folks think that Church is "God's Living Room!" All the comforts and coziness of home.   G.A. (who would prefer hardwood floors to carpet any day!)   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL    
(back) Subject: Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 15:38:04 +0000 (GMT)   --0-603894220-1039189084=3D:17098 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello, This is the penalty for making a sweeping statement! By "out of fashion", I meant the whole concept of the organ. EP action, a = simply HUGE specification, detached console (with one attached, mechanical = console?). organ all round the building, masses of romantic flute and = string tones, large basses..........in fact, the very essence of the = heroic (Wilhelmian?) organ in Germany. Transparency of tone just flies out = the window after the first 50 stops! Passau is a great whirling, swirling mass of sound.........but for Reger, = an absolute "Wow!" Pity about that pathetic half-length 32ft reed which is "neither fish nor = fowl". I suspect that the "in" fashion in Germany in most definitely NOT the = tones and design concept of Steinmeyer, and especially not Passau. It is a = squillion miles away from "werkprinzip". Still, I could live with it, if only I could find somewhere big enough to = house it. Regards, Colin Mitchell UK PS: Interestingly, there has always been a dispute as to whether Liverpool = or Passau are the biggest in Europe. Judging by the size of some of the = Mixtures, I feel that Passau would just pip Liverpool, but Ian Treacy = probably has other ideas. jon bertschinger <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> wrote:Colin M: when you say = that it makes a wonderful noise (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today?   I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.     Jon Bertschinger   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-603894220-1039189084=3D:17098 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P>This is the penalty for making a sweeping statement! <P>By "out of fashion", I meant the whole concept of the organ. EP action, = a simply HUGE specification, detached console (with one attached, = mechanical console?). organ all round the building, masses of romantic = flute and string tones, large basses..........in fact, the very essence of = the heroic (Wilhelmian?) organ in Germany. Transparency of tone just flies = out the window after the first 50 stops! <P>Passau is a great whirling, swirling mass of sound.........but for = Reger, an absolute "Wow!" <P>Pity about that pathetic half-length 32ft reed which is "neither fish = nor fowl". <P>I suspect that the "in" fashion in Germany in most definitely NOT the = tones and design concept of Steinmeyer, and especially not Passau. It is a = squillion miles away from "werkprinzip". <P>Still, I could live with it, if only I could find somewhere big enough = to house it. <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK <P>PS: Interestingly, there has always been a dispute as to whether = Liverpool or Passau are the biggest in Europe. Judging by the size of some = of the Mixtures, I feel that Passau would just pip Liverpool, but Ian = Treacy probably has other ideas. <P>&nbsp;<B><I>jon bertschinger &lt;jonberts@magiccablepc.com&gt;</I></B> = wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful = noise<BR>(steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. = <BR>Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today?<BR><BR>I'm = curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.<BR><BR><BR>Jon = Bertschinger<BR><BR>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!"<BR>PipeChat: A discussion List = for pipe/digital organs &amp; related topics<BR>HOMEPAGE : = http://www.pipechat.org<BR>List: = mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org<BR>Administration: = mailto:admin@pipechat.org<BR>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: = mailto:requests@pipechat.org<BR></BLOCKQUOTE><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mail_storage.html"><b><font = face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- = choose a size that fits your needs</font></b></a><br> --0-603894220-1039189084=3D:17098--  
(back) Subject: German romantic organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 16:18:59 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1425151313-1039191539=3D:59786 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello again, Isn't it amazing that serious and respected organ builders could dismiss a = fine Steinmeyer as "Radical".......by which they mean, presumably, not in = the French/English/USA way of doing things back in the 1930's. I also find it amazing that when Edmund Schulze built the utterly stunning = organs at Doncaster & Armley (the latter originally a house organ), they = changed the whole ethos of organ building in the North of England and had = many imitators. It is interesting to pick up on one remark in Richard's = posting...."astonishing.....considering the time-period in which it was = built". Well, let's briefly look at German romantic organ-building for a moment. Go back to the mid-19th century, and we come across fine organ-builders in = Germany, such as Ladegast, Rover, Walcker, Reubke (of THE Reubke fame) and = Schulze. I can speak with some authority on Schulze, who typified the = "school" of early romantic German organ building. Schulze went back maybe = 200 years as organ builders....in other words, their history is associated = with the Baroque period. Furthermore, they would tune and maintain many = original Baroque organs in Thuringia, as well as carry out repairs etc. Although many, if not all, of the above builders searched for heavier bass = tones, greater expression, ever larger scales and new romantic tones such = as Harmonic Flutes and beautiful string tone of various kinds, they never = moved away from the "old" ways in one important aspect. Given a half = decent specification, you will usually find, from this period, 16ft Great = organs and 32ft pedals, with proper chorus work. Furthermore, it was = typical that open-foot voicing was used (this changed by the first quarter = of the 20th century) and there was no nicking in the voicing = process.Interestingly, many of the German builders were themselves = inspired by Cavaille-Coll. The flueways were extremely narrow in the Baroque tradition of doing = things. The only real difference (apart from perhaps actual pitches and the = inter-relationship of departments) between the Baroque organ "choruses" = and the 19th century German ones, was that of scale.....Schulze opting for = very wide scales in the quest for an heroic power output. Straight-line = scaling was also the norm. What you are hearing when listening to a 1930's organ by Steinmeyer is a = sound closely associated with 19th century German organs which, by = association, remained sufficiently "Baroque" as to inspire those who had = forgotten all about it or knew nothing about it in the first place. The UK = organ builder T C Lewis (our equivalent to G Donald Harrison) was totally = in awe of Schulze organs, and this inspired him to build the BEST organs = in the UK. So......in parenthesis.....what you hear at Altoona is, I suspect, = actually a throw-back to the German classical tradition rather than = deliberate innovation on the part of Steinmeyer.....that's the way they = did it. That's why I adore German organ of the romantic period, and why they has = inspired me to write at considerable length about the work of Schulze in = the UK........interstingly, Senator Emerson Richards experimented with a = Schulze-type chorus at Atlantic City, and he referred to the resulting = sound as, "shattering!" Coming from him, I think that was a bit rich! All fascinating stuff! Regards, Colin Mitchell UK PS: If anyone is truly, really, deeply interested.....I have a small tome = on the subject. Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote:jon bertschinger = wrote:   > Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise > (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. > Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today?   > I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.   I too am curious as to what is meant by this remark. I have a recording of this instrument that I've listened to. Both the space and the instrument are HUGE so obviously, the sound is NOT going to be small and intimate.   Moreover, a few years ago, I had opportunity to crawl through and listen to the wonderful Steinmeyer instrument in the Altoona, PA Cathedral. The instrument is nothing short of astonishing, especially given the time-period in which it was built. Given the dark political cloud hanging over Germany during this time-period, it's a wonder that anything musical at all could be created there; much less exported and installed in this country!   Many of the stops were YEARS in advance of what G.D. Harrison, who was the "Pioneer" of the Organ Reform Movement was doing in 1931. Places like the Groton School were yet to come, and it would be interesting to know how this organ may have impacted Harrison's thinking.   Charles Callahan refers to this instrument in his book "The American Classic Organ; a history in letters". He indicated that such luminaries as Senator Emerson Richards and Henry Willis (3? -book not at hand!) visited the organ, but seemed to somewhat dismiss the organ as "radical". I cannot help but wonder if part of their negative perception was due to the unfinished (bare concrete walls) of the Cathedral when the organ opened and that they were more influenced by the surroundings, rather than the organ itself?   A very interesting subject to me, given my penchant to the German Romantic musical idiom!         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1425151313-1039191539=3D:59786 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello again, <P>Isn't it amazing that serious and respected organ builders could = dismiss a fine Steinmeyer as "Radical".......by which they mean, = presumably, not in the French/English/USA way of doing things back in the = 1930's. <P>I also find it amazing that when Edmund Schulze built the utterly = stunning organs at Doncaster &amp; Armley (the latter originally a house = organ), they changed the whole ethos of organ building in the North of = England and had many imitators. <P>It is interesting to pick up on one remark in Richard's = posting...."astonishing.....considering the time-period in which it was = built". <P>Well, let's briefly look at German romantic organ-building for a = moment. <P>Go back to the mid-19th century, and we come across fine organ-builders = in Germany, such as Ladegast, Rover, Walcker, Reubke (of THE Reubke fame) = and Schulze. I can speak with some authority on Schulze, who typified the = "school" of early romantic German organ building. Schulze went back maybe = 200 years as organ builders....in other words, their history is associated = with the Baroque period. Furthermore, they would tune and maintain many = original Baroque organs in Thuringia, as well as carry out repairs etc. <P>Although many, if not all, of the above builders searched for heavier = bass tones, greater expression, ever larger scales and new romantic tones = such as Harmonic Flutes and beautiful string tone of various kinds, they = never moved away from the "old" ways in one important aspect. Given a half = decent specification, you will usually find, from this period, 16ft Great = organs and 32ft pedals, with proper chorus work. Furthermore, it was = typical that open-foot voicing was used (this changed by the = first&nbsp;quarter of the 20th century) and there was no nicking in the = voicing process.Interestingly,&nbsp;many of the German builders were = themselves inspired by Cavaille-Coll. <P>The flueways were extremely narrow in the Baroque tradition of doing = things. <P>The only real difference (apart from perhaps actual pitches and the = inter-relationship of departments) between the Baroque organ "choruses" = and the 19th century German ones, was that of scale.....Schulze opting for = very wide scales in the quest for an heroic power output. Straight-line = scaling was also the norm. <P>What you are hearing when listening to a 1930's organ&nbsp;by = Steinmeyer is a sound closely associated with 19th century German organs = which, by association, remained sufficiently "Baroque" as to inspire those = who had forgotten all about it or knew nothing about it in the first place. The UK = organ builder T C Lewis (our equivalent to G Donald Harrison) was totally = in awe of Schulze organs, and this inspired him to build the BEST organs = in the UK. <P>So......in parenthesis.....what you hear at Altoona is, I suspect, = actually a throw-back to the German classical&nbsp;tradition rather = than&nbsp; deliberate innovation&nbsp;on the part of Steinmeyer.....that's = the way they did it. <P>That's why I adore German organ of the romantic period, and why they = has inspired me to write at considerable length about the work of Schulze = in the UK........interstingly, Senator Emerson Richards experimented with = a Schulze-type chorus at Atlantic City, and he referred to the resulting = sound as, "shattering!"&nbsp; <P>Coming from him, I think that was a bit rich! <P>All fascinating stuff! <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK <P>PS: If anyone is truly, really, deeply interested.....I have a small = tome on the subject. <P>&nbsp; <P>&nbsp; <P>&nbsp;<B><I>Richard Schneider &lt;arpschneider@starband.net&gt;</I></B> = wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px">jon bertschinger wrote:<BR><BR>&gt; Colin M: when you = say that it makes a wonderful noise<BR>&gt; (steinmeyer), but out of = fashion these days....what do you mean.<BR>&gt; Is it musical, or just = noisy? And what is fashion today?<BR><BR>&gt; I'm curious, since I'm a = voicer/builder.<BR><BR>I too am curious as to what is meant by this = remark. I have a recording<BR>of this instrument that I've listened to. = Both the space and the<BR>instrument are HUGE so obviously, the sound is = NOT going to be small and<BR>intimate.<BR><BR>Moreover, a few years ago, I = had opportunity to crawl through and listen<BR>to the wonderful Steinmeyer = instrument in the Altoona, PA Cathedral. <BR>The instrument is nothing = short of astonishing, especially given the<BR>time-period in which it was = built. Given the dark political cloud<BR>hanging over Germany during this = time-period, it's a wonder that<BR>anything musical at all could --0-1425151313-1039191539=3D:59786--