PipeChat Digest #3281 - Friday, December 6, 2002
 
Acoustics etc
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Steinmeyer, was translation help
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Steinmeyer
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Lodging Help!  (Off-topic)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Need microphone recommendations for recording organs
  by "Ron Pearcy" <ronniep@clear.net.nz>
an epiphany hymn
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music
  by "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com>
Microphones for recording organ
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: an epiphany hymn
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: German romantic organs
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Epiphany/Star carols?
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: an epiphany hymn
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Acoustics etc
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Acoustics etc From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 16:32:53 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1423870298-1039192373=3D:64282 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Last post to-day, Just a thought.......should anyone doubt that "classical" voicing is not = possible in a restricted acoustic. GO TO SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL IN LONDON! In fact, go and hear any organ by T C Lewis! (Then weep at your own = short-comings!) Of course, not even T C Lewis had to contend with carpetted interiors, so = you guys may as well look for inspiration from John Compton or Rudolph = Wurlitzer.....it's the only way! In fact, there is much to be learned from the work of John Compton.....now = that would be an interesting thread. Regards, Colin Mitchell UK         --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1423870298-1039192373=3D:64282 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Last post to-day, <P>Just a thought.......should anyone doubt that "classical" voicing is = not possible in a restricted acoustic. <P>GO TO SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL IN LONDON! <P>In fact, go and hear any organ by T C Lewis! (Then weep at your own = short-comings!) <P>Of course, not even T C Lewis had to contend with carpetted interiors, = so you guys may as well look for inspiration from John Compton or Rudolph = Wurlitzer.....it's the only way! <P>In fact, there is much to be learned from the work of John = Compton.....now that would be an interesting thread. <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK</P><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-1423870298-1039192373=3D:64282--  
(back) Subject: RE: Steinmeyer, was translation help From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 12:13:27 -0500   >Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. Is it musical, or just noisy?   Colin can answer for himself, of course, by my impression was that this is just colloquial British, like when a visiting English choirmaster sat down to the piano at the start of his first choir rehearsal at a conference and said something like, "Right.. now let's see what kind of a noise we can make, shall we?" I doubt that he was saying that it was either unmusical = or particularly loud.   Hans Hell has pointed out that this organ is no longer a Steinmeyer, strictly speaking, having been extensively modified, and that Felix likes it. A couple years ago on Piporg-L there was a thread "Must-hear organs" = in which I proposed the Passau Cathedral organ in that category and Felix contributed a message in agreement. From hearing it in both a Sunday morning mass and a noonday recital, I was not impressed by extraordinary power as much as by its remarkable richness and character, especially in various solo registrations with mutation work. The best way I can = describe it is to say that I really sensed being in Bavaria-- somehow it fit the baroque/rococo style of the architecture perfectly, and it reminded me of the marvelous old Riepp and Gabler organs in the same kingdom (which, = alas, I have heard only in recordings).   I heard a Steinmeyer of ca. 50-60 ranks in a Stiftskirch near Oberammergau (the name of the town escapes me). It is in the west gallery, with a Fernwerk at the east end behind (very behind) the altar, heard through a chute. There is also a new two-manual tracker in the wrap-around gallery = on the south side at the front of the nave. As I recall, the acoustics were not particularly alive and the building wasn't all that large, so one had the sense of hearing the organ up close and unflattered. I thought that = the sound of this Steinmeyer, dating perhaps from the 1920s, was rather = coarse. In terms of upperwork it was bright enough-- nothing like the typical American Austin of the same vintage-- but definitely a period piece that = one would not want to hear baroque music on. Was this the kind of tone, I wondered, to which Schweitzer was objecting when he wrote the essays now considered seminal to the Orgelbewegung? (Remember that Schweitzer also called the organ of S. Sulpice the most beautiful in the world: he = certainly didn't gainsay romantic styles categorically!) Perhaps the = tubular-pneumatic action contributes to this effect. I'm of course glad that it has been preserved and maintained despite changes of fashion, with the church = getting an additional organ in a contrasting style rather than removing or mutilating the older one. It's a good organ without being a great one. I just don't think I'm ready for quite that sound to be revived in new instruments. Then, too, one is a very small sample size. One would want = to hear other examples before generalizing as to how typical of the builder = it is.    
(back) Subject: Re: Steinmeyer From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 12:32:01 EST     --part1_121.1b17adce.2b223911_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Colin:   IMO these organs by Steinmeyer may be infact be right in the ballpark musically. I noted the destruction of the original work in Nidaros Cathedral. What a tragedy. The organ reform movement has indeed run its course, thank God. Oh there are a few hold outs here and there, but will be of little or no consequence in the big picture. Churches want and require an organ to support choral and congregational singing, tone painting, desireable tone colors. A Concert organ just doesn't work very well, where blend and balance are required along with the tonal shading of swell boxes.   Organ builders will consistantly move away from all unenclosed choruses. I think we have seen the last of the romantic bashing and attempts at eviscerating extant fine romantic organs. It was and is a monstrous mistake. Nidros is a good example. We have certainly learned a valuable and hard lesson. I hope we never repeat this sort of nonsense again. Organs financially are hard to comeby these days, and I think such projects as St. Giles Cathedral Scotland may never happen again. The rush to judgement against providing church organs to churches during the 60's to 90's will have a tremendous backlash, and already has. The successful organ builders are providing church organs again and moving away from the extremes of the organ reform movement. The so called Baroque guru's of the 60's to 90's have been roundly denounced as charlatans. who for a while foisted their views on just about everybody. We've had over 30 years of some really whimpy, middle and bottom starved organs. I'm glad that's over with, and hopefully for good.   Have we learned something valuable? Hopefully we have, returning to instruments with good balance throughout, not just upperwork happy, or snarly reed happy, but musically happy.   Ron Severin   --part1_121.1b17adce.2b223911_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Colin:<BR> <BR> IMO these organs by Steinmeyer may be infact be right in the<BR> ballpark musically. I noted the destruction of the original work<BR> in Nidaros Cathedral. What a tragedy. The organ reform movement<BR> has indeed run its course, thank God. Oh there are a few hold outs <BR> here and there, but will be of little or no consequence in the<BR> big picture. Churches want and require an organ to support<BR> choral and congregational singing, tone painting, desireable tone<BR> colors. A Concert organ just doesn't work very well, where blend and<BR> balance are required along with the tonal shading of swell boxes.<BR> <BR> Organ builders will consistantly move away from all unenclosed<BR> choruses. I think we have seen the last of the romantic bashing<BR> and attempts at eviscerating extant fine romantic organs. It was<BR> and is a monstrous mistake. Nidros is a good example. We have<BR> certainly learned a valuable and hard lesson. I hope we never <BR> repeat this sort of nonsense again. Organs financially are hard to<BR> comeby these days, and I think such projects as St. Giles Cathedral<BR> Scotland may never happen again. The rush to judgement against<BR> providing church organs to churches during the 60's to 90's will <BR> have a tremendous backlash, and already has. The successful<BR> organ builders are providing church organs again and moving away<BR> from the extremes of the organ reform movement. The so called<BR> Baroque guru's of the 60's to 90's have been roundly denounced as<BR> charlatans. who for a while foisted their views on just about = everybody.<BR> We've had over 30 years of some really whimpy, middle and bottom<BR> starved organs. I'm glad that's over with, and hopefully for good.<BR> <BR> Have we learned something valuable? Hopefully we have, returning<BR> to instruments with good balance throughout, not just upperwork<BR> happy, or snarly reed happy, but musically happy.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_121.1b17adce.2b223911_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Lodging Help! (Off-topic) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 11:42:43 -0600   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C29D4E.E18E6250 Content-Type: text/plain   Vickie:     Trinity Church (Wall Street) has a small guest house just east of the financial district run by an order of Episcopal nuns (I think it's the = Order of St. Margaret). It's nothing fancy, but very comfortable. They accommodate people with short-term needs like yours. You can call the church and ask if there is space available for the dates you need.     Peter     -----Original Message----- From: Myosotis51@aol.com [mailto:Myosotis51@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, December 05, 2002 10:13 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org; Piano-L@uamont.edu Subject: Lodging Help! (Off-topic)     Dear PipeChatters,   I need some help.   My boyfriend is going into the Hospital for Joint Diseases on 17th Street = in NYC for shoulder replacement surgery on January 14. He'll be in for at least 4 days, and it's too far (170 miles round-trip) for me to commute in to be with him.   There is a garage near the hospital where I can stash the car for about $25/day. The problem is, I need a place to stash ME. I'm on disability, = so I can't afford much, but I really want to be with him when he's in = hospital.   Does anyone have any suggestions for VERY cheap lodging in NYC? Once you all stop laughing, I'd really like any ideas you might have.   Thanks in advance, Victoria Ceruti 516-527-1008 cell     ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C29D4E.E18E6250 Content-Type: text/html   <html>   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Dus-ascii">     <meta name=3DGenerator content=3D"Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">   <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Tahoma; panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} span.EmailStyle17 {font-family:Arial; color:navy;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3DEN-US link=3Dblue vlink=3Dpurple>   <div class=3DSection1>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial = FAMILY=3DSANSSERIF><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Vickie:</span></fon= t></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial><span = style=3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial><span = style=3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Trinity Church (Wall Street) has a = small guest house just east of the financial district run by an order of = Episcopal nuns (I think it's the Order of St. Margaret).&nbsp; It's nothing fancy, but very comfortable.&nbsp; They accommodate people with short-term needs like yours.&nbsp; You can call the church and ask if there is space available for the dates you need.</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial><span = style=3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial><span = style=3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Peter</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D2 color=3Dnavy face=3DArial><span = style=3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal style=3D'margin-left:.5in'><font size=3D2 = face=3DTahoma><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'>-----Original = Message-----<br> <b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>From:</span></b> Myosotis51@aol.com [mailto:Myosotis51@aol.com] <br> <b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Sent:</span></b> Thursday, December = 05, 2002 10:13 PM<br> <b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>To:</span></b> pipechat@pipechat.org; Piano-L@uamont.edu<br> <b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Subject:</span></b> Lodging Help! = (Off-topic)</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal style=3D'margin-left:.5in'><font size=3D3 = face=3D"Times New Roman"><span style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3DMsoNormal style=3D'margin-left:.5in'><font size=3D2 = face=3DArial><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Dear PipeChatters,<br> <br> I need some help.<br> <br> My boyfriend is going into the Hospital for Joint Diseases on 17th Street = in NYC for shoulder replacement surgery on January 14.&nbsp; He'll be in for = at least 4 days, and it's too far (170 miles round-trip) for me to commute in = to be with him.&nbsp; <br> <br> There is a garage near the hospital where I can stash the car for about $25/day.&nbsp; The problem is, I need a place to stash ME.&nbsp; I'm on disability, so I can't afford much, but I really want to be with him when = he's in hospital.<br> <br> Does anyone have any suggestions for VERY cheap lodging in NYC?&nbsp; Once = you all stop laughing, I'd really like any ideas you might have.<br> <br> Thanks in advance,<br> Victoria Ceruti<br> 516-527-1008 cell</span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C29D4E.E18E6250--  
(back) Subject: Re: Need microphone recommendations for recording organs From: "Ron Pearcy" <ronniep@clear.net.nz> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 06:48:00 +0000 (GMT)   On 06 Dec, John Jarvis <jjarvis@attbi.com> wrote: > I am in the market for a couple of decent microphones that I can use to > record a large pipe organ for my juries and then use in my piano studio > with my students. I wish I had $1,000s to spend on a pair of great mics > but alas the budget of a musician needs to be economical / wise / cheap. > I am not planning to use these mics for amplification only for digital > recordings.   > Anyone got a recommendation?   Greetings John,   I have been using Radio Shack PZM mikes. These are not available any longer, but perhaps could be purchased second- hand. Allen Miller recommended them to me six or seven years ago. They have been excellent.   Cheers, Ronnie   -- ----- Ronnie Pearcy <ronniep@clear.net.nz> 17 Donegal Crescent, = Greenswood, Greenmeadows, Napier, New Zealand -------  
(back) Subject: an epiphany hymn From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 13:06:20 -0500   Hi, Allan. Here's an epiphany poem I wrote this morning to be sung to the tune of the French noel "Dites-nous, Marie." What look like eight stanzas are in fact only four verses to the hymn, as the noel is in two parts. Think I'll see if I can get the folks to sing it in my church.   Three wise men from afar Came following a star. What did they hope to find? What was their state of mind?   I wonder what they knew, And if I could know it too. What would I have to know To follow such a star so?   It was a king they sought: I wonder if they thought They=B9d find upon the ground No monarch robed and crowned   But on that stable floor An infant--nothing more. With shepherds gathered =8Cround-- For that was all they found.   But since they were so wise It came as no surprise. For things are so devised That truth can be disguised.   Nor was it really all In that straw-covered stall. For something there did shine: A glimpse of the divine.   So may we sometimes see Like those old travelers three The glory God may place In unaccustomed space.   For something is that sings In most unlikely things. God=B9s music in our ear: Don=B9t let it disappear.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Need recommendation on Mics for recording Organ Music From: "Steve Chandler" <stevec@open-tech.com> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 12:59:32 -0600   Hi Bruce,   > > This is not a specific recommendation, but rather a plea for some sound > (*!*) advice on recording large pipe organs in large and resonant = spaces.   It's a delicate balancing act. Generally, closer is better, certainly not = much farther than 25 feet.   > > I have just acquired some recordings of the excellent and historic St > George's Hall, Liverpool, organ. They are a complete muddle. The = resonance > is so pervasive that the original sound is almost completely lost in the > confused echos. <snip>   My guess is your microphones were placed too far from the pipes.   > > How are successful recordings made in these circumstances ? Narrow-beam > directional mics to cut down the amount of indirect sound ? Close-up = mics > plus distance mics with judicious after mixing ? Or are there some other > clever wheezes to get round this problem ?   The best sounding recordings I've heard used a very expensive stereo mic = (AKG C426) using a figure 8 polar pattern. The figure 8 polar pattern gets = the room resonance as well as the direct sound.   One thing I've done (and I haven't recorded many organs) is walk back and = forth while the instrument is playing. I listen for the balance between = ambience and direct sound. My experience has been that placing the mics = somewhat closer (10-15%) than this point yields good results.   Your success will be dependant on equipment and experience. I suggested = the Rode NT4 (stereo mic) in a private message to the original poster as a = quality stereo mic designed for ensemble recording. I would suggest to = anyone seeking to do recording that acquiring equipment is the first step = to acquiring experience. With a significant investment of experience = you'll know how to do it well. Good luck.   Steve Chandler    
(back) Subject: Microphones for recording organ From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 14:43:35 -0500   This topic was the subject of considerable discussion two plus years ago = as part of a discussion on recording organ on mini-disk recorders. At that time some users had very satisfactory results for Core = microphones. Their URL is http://www.core-sound.com/. As I recollect the discussion = Core assembled from the components that they offer units specifically suitable for recording organ music. Ron Pearcy refers to a Radio Shack mic. I believe this was a Crown mic but labelled Radio Shack. A look at Crowns site at http://www.crownaudio.com/mic_htm/pzm.htm might = be worthwhile.   HD    
(back) Subject: Re: an epiphany hymn From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 06 Dec 2002 14:48:15 -0500   Please excuse my sending it to the whole group. Dumb!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: German romantic organs From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 09:29:16 +1300   Yes, please, I'm interested in your small tome.   Glad to hear you say T.C.Lewis was the best of English, as I've been = saying this for over 40 years now. Many others have scoffed at me, saying Father Willis, H&H, Walker and Hill have all been far better, but for my part = their tone isn't anywhere near as good, nor their could they better Lewis's = basic concept of a good harmonically-rich Great and firm pedal stops without reliance on the reeds.   Ross -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, December 07, 2002 5:20 AM Subject: German romantic organs     Hello again,   Isn't it amazing that serious and respected organ builders could dismiss = a fine Steinmeyer as "Radical".......by which they mean, presumably, not in the French/English/USA way of doing things back in the 1930's.   I also find it amazing that when Edmund Schulze built the utterly = stunning organs at Doncaster & Armley (the latter originally a house organ), they changed the whole ethos of organ building in the North of England and had many imitators.   It is interesting to pick up on one remark in Richard's posting...."astonishing.....considering the time-period in which it was built".   Well, let's briefly look at German romantic organ-building for a moment.   Go back to the mid-19th century, and we come across fine organ-builders = in Germany, such as Ladegast, Rover, Walcker, Reubke (of THE Reubke fame) and Schulze. I can speak with some authority on Schulze, who typified the "school" of early romantic German organ building. Schulze went back maybe 200 years as organ builders....in other words, their history is associated with the Baroque period. Furthermore, they would tune and maintain many original Baroque organs in Thuringia, as well as carry out repairs etc.   Although many, if not all, of the above builders searched for heavier = bass tones, greater expression, ever larger scales and new romantic tones such = as Harmonic Flutes and beautiful string tone of various kinds, they never = moved away from the "old" ways in one important aspect. Given a half decent specification, you will usually find, from this period, 16ft Great organs and 32ft pedals, with proper chorus work. Furthermore, it was typical that open-foot voicing was used (this changed by the first quarter of the 20th century) and there was no nicking in the voicing process.Interestingly, = many of the German builders were themselves inspired by Cavaille-Coll.   The flueways were extremely narrow in the Baroque tradition of doing things.   The only real difference (apart from perhaps actual pitches and the inter-relationship of departments) between the Baroque organ "choruses" = and the 19th century German ones, was that of scale.....Schulze opting for = very wide scales in the quest for an heroic power output. Straight-line scaling was also the norm.   What you are hearing when listening to a 1930's organ by Steinmeyer is a sound closely associated with 19th century German organs which, by association, remained sufficiently "Baroque" as to inspire those who had forgotten all about it or knew nothing about it in the first place. The UK organ builder T C Lewis (our equivalent to G Donald Harrison) was totally = in awe of Schulze organs, and this inspired him to build the BEST organs in = the UK.   So......in parenthesis.....what you hear at Altoona is, I suspect, actually a throw-back to the German classical tradition rather than deliberate innovation on the part of Steinmeyer.....that's the way they = did it.   That's why I adore German organ of the romantic period, and why they has inspired me to write at considerable length about the work of Schulze in = the UK........interstingly, Senator Emerson Richards experimented with a Schulze-type chorus at Atlantic City, and he referred to the resulting = sound as, "shattering!"   Coming from him, I think that was a bit rich!   All fascinating stuff!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: If anyone is truly, really, deeply interested.....I have a small tome on the subject.           Richard Schneider <arpschneider@starband.net> wrote:   jon bertschinger wrote:   > Colin M: when you say that it makes a wonderful noise > (steinmeyer), but out of fashion these days....what do you mean. > Is it musical, or just noisy? And what is fashion today?   > I'm curious, since I'm a voicer/builder.   I too am curious as to what is meant by this remark. I have a = recording of this instrument that I've listened to. Both the space and the instrument are HUGE so obviously, the sound is NOT going to be small = and intimate.   Moreover, a few years ago, I had opportunity to crawl through and = listen to the wonderful Steinmeyer instrument in the Altoona, PA Cathedral. The instrument is nothing short of astonishing, especially given the time-period in which it was built. Given the dark political cloud hanging over Germany during this time-period, it's a wonder that anything musical at all could    
(back) Subject: Epiphany/Star carols? From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 15:26:08 -0500   I'm appealing to the collective wisdom of organists: Our Senior Minister (UMC) has decided that emphasis for the Christmas Eve services this year will be "The Wise Men". I know what you're thinking, but I'm stuck with this mandate. Of course, the congregation is going to sing Christmas hymns rather than Epiphany hymns. But I'm considering writing a prelude for two octaves of bells and harp on Epiphany or star carols. I have good ringers and three rehearsals over the next few weeks. If anyone would like to share your favorite ones (and I'm trying to jog my creativity beyond the obvious stuff like "Wie Schon Leuchtet"...) please do so privately, I'll keep the responses and post them to the list if anyone cares to see them.   Thanks!   Chuck Peery Cincinnati    
(back) Subject: Re: an epiphany hymn From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 16:43:30 -0500   > Please excuse my sending it to the whole group. Dumb! > Good heavens, why apologize?? I'm sure lots of folks on the list liked = it. You should attach some form of copyright to it, though.   Cheers, TommyLee Reston, VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics etc From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2002 18:11:31 EST     --part1_1a3.cfc385e.2b2288a3_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/6/2002 1:44:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:     > In fact, there is much to be learned from the work of John = Compton.....now > that would be an interesting thread. >   Do I remember correctly that John Compton was the VERY FIRST builder to intergrate pipes and elecytronics (tho maybe that was Conacher...i = forget!). Seems to me there is a hybrid theatre organ where the top (solo) manual = was a hammond-like operation with tube amplifiers and speakers...but again my memory is a bit dodgy sometimes...maybe built for one of the BBC studios?   Rick M   --part1_1a3.cfc385e.2b2288a3_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/6/2002 1:44:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">In fact, there is = much to be learned from the work of John Compton.....now that would be an = interesting thread. <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Do I remember correctly that John Compton was the VERY FIRST builder = to intergrate pipes and elecytronics (tho maybe that was Conacher...i = forget!). Seems to me there is a hybrid theatre organ where the top (solo) = manual was a hammond-like operation with tube amplifiers and = speakers...but again my memory is a bit dodgy sometimes...maybe built for = one of the BBC studios? <BR> <BR>Rick M</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1a3.cfc385e.2b2288a3_boundary--