PipeChat Digest #3286 - Saturday, December 7, 2002
 
Re: Crystal Palace organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Crystal Palace organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Crystal Palace organ
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Crystal Palace organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Romantic notions
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Acoustics etc
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Romantic notions
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Hammond Theatre Organ Available in NC
  by "Bob and Jane Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net>
Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: Romantic notions
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Acoustics etc
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Palace organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 10:20:38 -0800   From the Winchester Cathedral site:   The core of the present Winchester Cathedral Organ consists of pipe-work from the monumental organ built by Henry Willis for the Great Exhibition at Hyde Park. 1n 1851 this was the first large organ wholly built by Willis, and with 70 stops it was also the largest at the Exhibition. It created considerable interest including a private visit by Queen Victoria to hear the, instrument Also present at the Exhibition was Winchester Cathedral's organist Samuel Sebastian Wesley who befriended and collaborated with the young organbuilder. In 1854, at Wesley's instigation. the organ was installed at Winchester in a reduced but improved form as a four-manual instrument of 49 stops with the then unique features of thumb pistons and a radiating and concave pedal board - believed to have been the first cathedral organ in the world to have such features - and fully developed choruses and mixtures both on the manuals and the pedal organ. Queen Victoria maintained her interest. and she and Prince Albert were among the subscribers to the new instrument. John Stainer was one of the choristers at the inaugural service, and in his early years this instrument well known to Hubert Parry. In a real sense the Winchester organ was a prototype for numerous other cathedral organs built by Henry Willis in his long career of almost 60 years in which his firm built over 2000 organs.   After long service at Winchester the organ was rebuilt and enlarged by Willis in 1897 with some tonal alternations alterations reflecting his developed house style and changed public taste. However, the instrument has always retained a strongly classical foundation A further considerable enlargement by the firm of Hele took place in 1905. Of their additions the pedal bombardes (nos 12 and 13) and one stop on the swell organ (no 56) remain.   Harrison & Harrison took over the care of the organ and undertook a major rebuilding in 1938 when the instrument acquired a more romantic bias, although preserving the historic material from the Great Exhibition organ. Almost 50 years later from 1986 to 1988 they completely reconstructed the instrument in its present form of 79 stops, incorporating a new dual-purpose Nave division and a largely new Choir organ. The pedal organ was given greater versatility and clarity with new and completely independent choruses. The original Willis work returned to its due prominence in the instrument by reversing some of the changes made in 1905 and 1938.   There is virtually no extension or "borrowing" of stops in the present organ. The detached console has 108 draw stops and comprehensive playing aids. This is one of the most versatile cathedral organs capable of doing justice to the music of all schools of music for the instrument, as the present series of recitals will demonstrate by including the classical masterworks of J. S. Bach and the monumental 19th and 2Oth Century romantic works composed in homage to his name.   Rowland Wateridge - from the 1999 Organ Recital Brochure   Barry H Bodie wrote: > > Wasn't the Willis Exhibition organ moved to Winchester Cathedral? > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > quilisma@socal.rr.com > Sent: Saturday, December 07, 2002 12:12 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Crystal Palace organ > > >From what I could discover, it was built by Willis, and contained 70 > stops, but I wasn't able to find a stoplist ... the Willis archives are > under construction ... whether it was the world's largest at the time is > open to question (grin). Presumably it was destroyed by the fire in the > 1930s. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Stanley Lowkis wrote: > > > > Hello All, and Merry Christmas! > > A little bit of web surfing for "The Crystal Palace" brought me > > to the following site: > > http://www.victorianstation.com/palace.html > > > > In the description, a reference is made to the "World's Largest > Organ." > > I wonder what happened to it? > > > > Stan Lowkis > > > > Bob Conway wrote: > > > > > > Stan Yoder mentioned the Beecham/Goosens Messiah, I have that on a > CD, it's > > > OK, but not my favourite. It is available on an EMI CD, > > > > > > My preference is for the performance by Sir Andrew Davis, with the > Toronto > > > Mendelssohn Choir and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, which is also > > > available on an EMI CD set. Big and full of roundness, - just the > way I > > > like it! > > > > > > However, my memories go back to the "Grand Old Days" at the Crystal > Palace > > > in London, in the 1930's where everything, including the kitchen > sink was > > > used. A choir of a 1000 voices, with an orchestra to match, - but I > don't > > > remember if there was an organ in it! There probably was, but the > Crystal > > > Palace was burned down some time before WW II. > > > > > > Well, I was only twelve, or thereabouts, so you will have to forgive > > > me! Over the years I have sung in varying sized performances, some > with > > > only one or two voices to each part, others with a choir of over 200 > > > voices, - I like them all, but, as I say, the performance that I > like above > > > all others, is the one by the Toronto Choir and Orchestra. > > > > > > I have also sung in a performance in the Alexandra Palace in North > London, > > > where there was most certainly an organ part, - again one of the > really big > > > performances of the Messiah. Fun to do, especially when you have to > get > > > back home from the heights of the location of "Alley Pally" in a > real > > > London peasouper fog! > > > > > > However it comes, big or small, I like Messiah at any time, - not > just at > > > Christmas! > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Palace organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 10:23:13 -0800   The present specification is on the Winchester Cathedral website, but I can't get it to paste over.   Cheers,   Bud   Barry H Bodie wrote: > > Wasn't the Willis Exhibition organ moved to Winchester Cathedral? > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > quilisma@socal.rr.com > Sent: Saturday, December 07, 2002 12:12 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Crystal Palace organ > > >From what I could discover, it was built by Willis, and contained 70 > stops, but I wasn't able to find a stoplist ... the Willis archives are > under construction ... whether it was the world's largest at the time is > open to question (grin). Presumably it was destroyed by the fire in the > 1930s. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Stanley Lowkis wrote: > > > > Hello All, and Merry Christmas! > > A little bit of web surfing for "The Crystal Palace" brought me > > to the following site: > > http://www.victorianstation.com/palace.html > > > > In the description, a reference is made to the "World's Largest > Organ." > > I wonder what happened to it? > > > > Stan Lowkis > > > > Bob Conway wrote: > > > > > > Stan Yoder mentioned the Beecham/Goosens Messiah, I have that on a > CD, it's > > > OK, but not my favourite. It is available on an EMI CD, > > > > > > My preference is for the performance by Sir Andrew Davis, with the > Toronto > > > Mendelssohn Choir and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, which is also > > > available on an EMI CD set. Big and full of roundness, - just the > way I > > > like it! > > > > > > However, my memories go back to the "Grand Old Days" at the Crystal > Palace > > > in London, in the 1930's where everything, including the kitchen > sink was > > > used. A choir of a 1000 voices, with an orchestra to match, - but I > don't > > > remember if there was an organ in it! There probably was, but the > Crystal > > > Palace was burned down some time before WW II. > > > > > > Well, I was only twelve, or thereabouts, so you will have to forgive > > > me! Over the years I have sung in varying sized performances, some > with > > > only one or two voices to each part, others with a choir of over 200 > > > voices, - I like them all, but, as I say, the performance that I > like above > > > all others, is the one by the Toronto Choir and Orchestra. > > > > > > I have also sung in a performance in the Alexandra Palace in North > London, > > > where there was most certainly an organ part, - again one of the > really big > > > performances of the Messiah. Fun to do, especially when you have to > get > > > back home from the heights of the location of "Alley Pally" in a > real > > > London peasouper fog! > > > > > > However it comes, big or small, I like Messiah at any time, - not > just at > > > Christmas! > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Palace organ From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 13:39:22 -0500   At 10:23 AM 12/7/02 -0800, you wrote: >The present specification is on the Winchester Cathedral website, but I >can't get it to paste over. > >Cheers, > >Bud   Maybe I can get it to paste over!   http://www.winchester-cathedral.org.uk/choir.html   Wonder of wonders, there it is!   Indeed, the organ at Winchester Cathedral is the one from the original Crystal Palace, - I wonder what organ was there,- if any, - at the time of =   the Crystal Palace fire.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Palace organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 12:41:06 -0600   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > >From what I could discover, it was built by Willis, and contained 70 > stops, but I wasn't able to find a stoplist ... the Willis archives are > under construction ... whether it was the world's largest at the time is > open to question (grin).   I had always thought (or assumed) that it was a Willis too, but apparently not. See the National Pipe Organ Register at   http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/npor.home.html   Click on Index and type in N16275. I find that it is listed as a three manual by J. W. Walker & Sons, rebuilt with the addition of a fourth manual in 1920. It appears to have been quite a fine instrument with 32' Double Open Diapason, 32' Bombarde, etc. The Tuba was called Tromba as in the Walker at Bristol Cathedral. It gives the date of the fire as 1936.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic notions From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 19:10:08 +0000 (GMT)   --0-645708700-1039288208=3D:5287 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello, Amen to all that Ron! The danger of your original posting was that of misrepresentation......the = bad organs are always in the majority. It is the minority of excellent = organs to which our attention should turn.....from them we may learn. Anyway, who am I to talk when I delight in Wurlitzers and play a Baroque = instrument? It's like having two passions..........Fly fishing and Motor Racing! (Now = that IS eclectic) Regards, Colin Mitchell UK       --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-645708700-1039288208=3D:5287 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P>&nbsp; <P>Amen to all that Ron! <P>The danger of your original posting was that of = misrepresentation......the bad organs are always in the majority. It is = the minority of excellent organs to which our attention should = turn.....from them we may learn. <P>Anyway, who am I to talk when I delight in Wurlitzers and play a = Baroque instrument? <P>It's like having two passions..........Fly fishing and Motor Racing! = (Now that IS eclectic) <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><FONT = face=3Darial,helvetica></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-645708700-1039288208=3D:5287--  
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics etc From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 19:21:46 -0000   John Compton's Melotone first appeared as an integral part of some his = pipe theatre organs more or less at the same time as the Hammond (1935 ?), and = a little later as a separate self-contained electronic organ. Many Compton Melotones are still playing. They used electrostatic tone generators = instead the |Hammond's electromagnetic ones.   There has just been a very extensive discussion of the Melotone on the 'Second Touch' list. A web search for 'Compton Melotone' will produce = loads of information.   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html     ----- Original Message -----       > In a message dated 12/6/2002 1:44:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, > cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: >   > Do I remember correctly that John Compton was the VERY FIRST builder to > intergrate pipes and elecytronics (tho maybe that was Conacher...i forget!). > Seems to me there is a hybrid theatre organ where the top (solo) manual was a > hammond-like operation with tube amplifiers and speakers...but again my > memory is a bit dodgy sometimes...maybe built for one of the BBC = studios? >    
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic notions From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 14:44:59 EST     --part1_39.315bcdfb.2b23a9bb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Colin:   I like all sorts of organ music too. Most of it anyway.   I do concentrate on the good instruments, but wonder sometimes why there should be any bad ones at all.   In the US a car made on a Monday or a Friday can be more likely to be a lemon, that's what we call problem automobiles, LEMONS! Reason: When the whistle blew on Friday certain parts may be less secure, and not properly installed in the haste of getting away for the weekend. On Monday they are overlooked, especially if overlooked because of a headache on Monday from too much brew and football on the tele.   To my mind, the process of building an organ is more custom, one of a kind, each part carefully built, for a particular building. Nothing being selected at random but carefully considered as part of the whole. There should be no LEMONS here at all. It should make no difference in quality whether the organ is a three rank unit organ or a 100 or 200 plus rank behemouth or anything inbetween. The same "relative" amount of time going into each part. Consideration of the accoustic live or dead or somewhere inbetween, Stops that work best under these conditions, and the voicing techniques appropriate for the given situation, and the usefulness of the specification for a particular denomination. No, there should never be a lemon here. NEVER! Cutting corners has never worked, and you get a LEMON everytime. Ironic, but true!   Ron Severin   --part1_39.315bcdfb.2b23a9bb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi Colin:<BR> <BR> I like all sorts of organ music too. Most of it anyway.<BR> <BR> I do concentrate on the good instruments, but wonder<BR> sometimes why there should be any bad ones at all.<BR> <BR> In the US a car made on a Monday or a Friday can<BR> be more likely to be a lemon, that's what we call<BR> problem automobiles, LEMONS! Reason: When the whistle<BR> blew on Friday certain parts may be less secure, and not<BR> properly installed in the haste of getting away for the weekend.<BR> On Monday they are overlooked, especially if overlooked<BR> because of a headache on Monday from too much brew and<BR> football on the tele.<BR> <BR> To my mind, the process of building an organ is more custom,<BR> one of a kind, each part carefully built, for a particular building.<BR> Nothing being selected at random but carefully considered as<BR> part of the whole. There should be no LEMONS here at all. It<BR> should make no difference in quality whether the organ is a three<BR> rank unit organ or a 100 or 200 plus rank behemouth or anything<BR> inbetween. The same "relative" amount of time going into each<BR> part. Consideration of the accoustic live or dead or somewhere<BR> inbetween, Stops that work best under these conditions, and the<BR> voicing techniques appropriate for the given situation, and the<BR> usefulness of the specification for a particular denomination. <BR> No, there should never be a lemon here. NEVER! Cutting corners<BR> has never worked, and you get a LEMON everytime. Ironic, but true!<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_39.315bcdfb.2b23a9bb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Hammond Theatre Organ Available in NC From: "Bob and Jane Hanudel" <hanudel@schoollink.net> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 15:56:19 -0500   List members, For your information: Available: Hammond-1000 theatre organ, with a pedalboard of 1 octave; two 44-key manuals; one Leslie 200-watt speaker, model # 145. The volume pedal switch needs to be replaced. A cassette recorder built into the organ does not work. Other than that, organ in very good condition. Located in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, approximately 1 mile from Interstate 95. If interested, please email me privately. Thanks. Jane Hanudel   hanudel@schoollink.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Steinmeyer, was translation help From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2002 18:13:19 -0500   At 05:38 PM 12/6/2002 -0600, you wrote: >Colin Mitchell wrote: > > > By "out of fashion", I meant the whole concept of the organ. EP > > action, a simply HUGE specification, > detached console (with > > one attached, mechanical console?). > > >This trend is also starting to spread to the U.K., and the >statistics of the Institute of British Organ Builders shows >that the percentage of tracker organs built in Britain >dropped from 94% in 1999 to 86% in 2000 and 81% in 2001 -- >showing a gradual trend back towards electric action >instruments. (The figure for 2002 is not yet available, but >if the same general trend continues the percentage of >tracker organs could be down to around 75 or 76% in Britain >this year.) It is confidently expected here that the same >trend will start to manifest itself even in countries like >Holland, Denmark and Germany within the next four or five >years. > >A particularly interesting phenomenon is manifesting itself >in connection with the new organs in the Symphony Hall, >Birmingham, and the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester. These >are both equipped with both tracker and electric action >consoles. Almost all the concert organists who have visited >both these locations have chosen to use the electric rather >than the tracker console. > >John Speller John,   How many organs have actually been built in the U.K. these last few years. My guess is that entirely new organs (no re-used pipe, or chests), =   with more than 10 stops is probably no more than 15 or 20 per year. In a lot of cases these would go into Church of England parishes where there is =   a choir, and the liturgy is done. Quite often an organ with electric control is much easier to deal with than a tracker in these situations.   As to the situation on the continent, my guess is that at least in = Holland, they will stick to trackers, as the organ in a lot of the Reformed = churches are used primarily for congregational singing, and playing the uniquely Dutch protestant hymnody (improvesations and variations based on the = Psalms or Christian songs). In fact in my sister's church they just threw out an =   electro-pneumatic organ and replaced it with an old tracker. She liked = the sound of the EP organ better. The fact is too, that in Holland as in elsewhere, church going is way down, church closures on the increase. If this trend doesn't change, there won't be much of a market period.   Just my thoughts.........   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Romantic notions From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 23:49:52 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1492855086-1039304992=3D:2425 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hi Ron, Shouldn't that be Lemmens? I'm sorry about my little joke about "top and bottom, but no = middle".....open the link to the Mander USA website and you will find a = divided organ without "middle". A little visual pun. Regards, Colin RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:Hi Colin:   I like all sorts of organ music too. Most of it anyway.   I do concentrate on the good instruments, but wonder sometimes why there should be any bad ones at all.   In the US a car made on a Monday or a Friday can be more likely to be a lemon, that's what we call problem automobiles, LEMONS! Reason: When the whistle blew on Friday certain parts may be less secure, and not properly installed in the haste of getting away for the weekend. On Monday they are overlooked, especially if overlooked because of a headache on Monday from too much brew and football on the tele.   To my mind, the process of building an organ is more custom, one of a kind, each part carefully built, for a particular building. Nothing being selected at random but carefully considered as part of the whole. There should be no LEMONS here at all. It should make no difference in quality whether the organ is a three rank unit organ or a 100 or 200 plus rank behemouth or anything inbetween. The same "relative" amount of time going into each part. Consideration of the accoustic live or dead or somewhere inbetween, Stops that work best under these conditions, and the voicing techniques appropriate for the given situation, and the usefulness of the specification for a particular denomination. No, there should never be a lemon here. NEVER! Cutting corners has never worked, and you get a LEMON everytime. Ironic, but true!   Ron Severin       --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1492855086-1039304992=3D:2425 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hi Ron, <P>&nbsp; <P>Shouldn't that be Lemmens? <P>I'm sorry about my little joke about "top and bottom, but no = middle".....open the link to the Mander USA website and you will find a = divided organ without "middle". <P>A little visual pun. <P>Regards, <P>Colin <P>&nbsp;<B><I>RonSeverin@aol.com</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT face=3DArial = lang=3D0 size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF">Hi Colin:<BR><BR>I like all sorts = of organ music too. Most of it anyway.<BR><BR>I do concentrate on the good = instruments, but wonder<BR>sometimes why there should be any bad ones at = all.<BR><BR>In the US a car made on a Monday or a Friday can<BR>be more = likely to be a lemon, that's what we call<BR>problem automobiles, LEMONS! = Reason: When the whistle<BR>blew on Friday certain parts may be less = secure, and not<BR>properly installed in the haste of getting away for the = weekend.<BR>On Monday they are overlooked, especially if = overlooked<BR>because of a headache on Monday from too much brew = and<BR>football on the tele.<BR><BR>To my mind, the process of building an = organ is more custom,<BR>one of a kind, each part carefully built, for a = particular building.<BR>Nothing being selected at random but carefully = considered as<BR>part --0-1492855086-1039304992=3D:2425--  
(back) Subject: Re: Acoustics etc From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 23:56:04 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1404793822-1039305364=3D:38822 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Yikes! I didn't write that at all! I did, however, reply to it. Regards, Colin Mitchell UK Bruce Miles <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:     > In a message dated 12/6/2002 1:44:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, > cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes: >   > Do I remember correctly that John Compton was the VERY FIRST builder to > intergrate pipes and elecytronics (tho maybe that was Conacher...i forget!). > Seems to me there is a hybrid theatre organ where the top (solo) manual was a > hammond-like operation with tube amplifiers and speakers...but again my > memory is a bit dodgy sometimes...maybe built for one of the BBC = studios? >             --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1404793822-1039305364=3D:38822 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Yikes! <P>I didn't write that at all! I did, however, reply to it. <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK <P>&nbsp;<B><I>Bruce Miles &lt;bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR><BR><BR>&gt; In a message dated 12/6/2002 1:44:54 = PM Eastern Standard Time,<BR>&gt; cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk = writes:<BR>&gt;<BR><BR>&gt; Do I remember correctly that John Compton was = the VERY FIRST builder to<BR>&gt; intergrate pipes and elecytronics (tho = maybe that was Conacher...i<BR>forget!).<BR>&gt; Seems to me there is a = hybrid theatre organ where the top (solo) manual<BR>was a<BR>&gt; = hammond-like operation with tube amplifiers and speakers...but again = my<BR>&gt; memory is a bit dodgy sometimes...maybe built for one of the = BBC studios?<BR>&gt;<BR><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-1404793822-1039305364=3D:38822--