PipeChat Digest #3287 - Sunday, December 8, 2002
 
Winchester Cathedral
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Misconception Questionnaire
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Misconception Questionnaire
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Winchester Cathedral
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Winchester Cathedral
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Winchester Cathedral
  by "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com>
Re: Winchester Cathedral
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Winchester Cathedral From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2002 00:03:20 +0000 (GMT)   --0-2005472225-1039305800=3D:39872 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello, I don't know what make of organ was there when the Crystal Palace went up = in flames, but somewhere in the history of the organ there is a wonderful = quote about the instrument at Winchester. "Those who drew near could not bear the sound" Anyone know the source and the full version of the original? Regards, Colin Mitchell UK Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote:Indeed, the organ at Winchester = Cathedral is the one from the original Crystal Palace, - I wonder what organ was there,- if any, - at the time of =   the Crystal Palace fire.               --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-2005472225-1039305800=3D:39872 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello, <P>I don't know what make of organ was there when the Crystal Palace went = up in flames, but somewhere in the history of the organ there is a = wonderful quote about the instrument at Winchester. <P>"Those who drew near could not bear the sound" <P>Anyone know the source and the full version of the original? <P>Regards, <P>Colin Mitchell UK <P>&nbsp;<B><I>Bob Conway &lt;conwayb@sympatico.ca&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Indeed, the organ at Winchester Cathedral is the one = from the original <BR>Crystal Palace, - I wonder what organ was there,- if = any, - at the time of <BR>the Crystal Palace = fire.<BR><BR><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mai= l_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With Yahoo! Mail you = can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-2005472225-1039305800=3D:39872--  
(back) Subject: Misconception Questionnaire From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 19:04:07 EST     --part1_b0.30c74b4e.2b23e677_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   I am preparing a demonstration/recital and would like to use a short=3D20 questionnaire to determine people attitudes or misconceptions about = pipe=3D20 organs and organ music. My plan is to have people fill our the=3D20 questionnaire before and after the program. =3D20   So far I have come up with the following questions: 1) Do you think the pipe organ is a =3DE2=3D80=3D9Csad=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = sounding instrume=3D nt? =3D20   2) Do you think the pipe organ has many sounds? =3D20 3) Do you think organ music is dull? =3D20 4) Do you think the pipe organ is a very difficult instrument to play? = =3D20 5) Do you think the pipe organ is a fun instrument to play? =3D20   I'd like suggestions for further exploration into the commonly held = myths=3D20 about pipe organs and organ music.   The program is (tentatively): Johann Sebastian Bach was a master at demonstrating and testing new = pipe=3D20 organs. He was loved by those who attended the recitals and feared by = organ=3D =3D20 builders whose instruments he put through their paces. Some of his compositions were = used=3D =3D20 for these demonstrations. It is possible that in demonstrating the = organ,=3D =3D20 Bach did not begin with full organ, but began with the most important stop = i=3D n=3D20 the organ... the Principal 8 .   It would be fitting that the first piece played on a new instrument might = be=3D =3D20 one written based on a Baptism hymn: To Jordan Came the Lord, Our Christ. This piece = i=3D s=3D20 from the Catechism Hymns which were used to teach Catechism or beliefs of = the=3D20 church. The manual (or accompaniment) part gives us movement which = can=3D20 symbolize a flowing river. The hymn melody is played on the = 4=3DE2=3D80=3D99 Pri=3D ncipal in=3D20 the Pedal Organ. The Principal stop is unique to the pipe organ and = does=3D20 not imitate or sound like any other instrument. It is the most gentle = and=3D20 warm sound that I can think of, and is very soothing for practicing for = long=3D =3D20 periods of time, and, I think, very appropriate for a = =3DE2=3D80=3D9Cteaching=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D9D piece.=3D20       The Principal Chorus   To demonstrate the Principal chorus, the Entree or opening movement of = Sonat=3D a=3D20 I by   Alexandre Guilmant is played. The Principal chorus of the Great Organ = is=3D20 used in dialog with the Principal chorus of the Positive Organ and the = Swell=3D =3D20 Organ.   The Reed Chorus To demonstrate the Reed stops of the organ, a fugue based on the Kyrie = (Lord=3D ,=3D20 have mercy) from the Mass for the Parishes by Louis Couperin is played. When = it=3D =3D20 was written this music was used in the course of regular worship to = enhance=3D20 the liturgical text. Early music was written in a plain form with = the=3D20 assumption that the performer would add embellishments, such as trills = and=3D20 unequal rhythm. The fugue will be played twice, once as it written, = and=3D20 again using ornamentation which transforms it from a stately fugue to = a=3D20 delightful dance, perhaps symbolic of the joy we have as a result of = God=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D99s=3D20 promise of forgiveness for our sins. The Fagot 16 and Oboe 8 in the = Swell=3D20 Organ are used with the Trompete 8 in the Great Organ. French organs = of=3D20 this period had only a few pedals which were used as = =3DE2=3D80=3D9Chelpers=3DE2=3D80=3D =3D9D when extra=3D20 low notes were needed.       The Individual Stops (or voices) of the Organ   Trompete ....... Trumpet Tune . . . . Henry Purcell Fagot 16, Oboe 8 Penguin=3DE2=3D80=3D99s Playtime . . . . = Nigel O=3D gden Krummhorn 8 A Clarinet Tune . . . . Harrison Oxley Flute stops Scherzo for the White Rabbit . . . = Nigel=3D20 Ogden Accompaniment: Swell: Rohrflote 8, Nacthorn 4; Gemshorn & = Voix=3D20 Coelestis Solos: Gedekt 8 (Po); Quintaden 16 (Gr); Koppelflote 4 (Po); Bordun = 8=3D =3D20 (Gr) Spitzflote 4   Full Organ Bach not only demonstrated the various stops on the organ, but also tested=3D20 the tuning system, the sensitivity of the mechanism, and the reliability = of=3D20 the wind system. An excellent piece for this purpose is the Toccata = and=3D20 Fugue in d-minor by J. S. Bach. The opening toccata demonstrates the = tonal=3D =3D20 relationship of the three manual divisions to each other. As well, = the=3D20 large, arpeggiated chords on the manual with a low, wind-consuming note = on=3D20 the pedals, using full organ put the wind system to the test in a big way. = =3D20 The fugue tests the sensitivity of the mechanical action of the organ, = as=3D20 well as beautifully showing how terraced dynamics and tonal individuality = of=3D =3D20 the three manual divisions.=3D20   Just for fun . . . Weeping Willows and Chrysanthemums . . . . Scott Joplin Toccata and Fugue (Opus __) . . . . Max Reger Carillon de Westminster . . . . Louis Vierne     Comments and suggestions, please! ;-)   Thanks.   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling = Acres=3D20 http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 check out <A = HREF=3D3D"http://www.=3D visionsuccess.com/BC2053">Vision Success </A>       --part1_b0.30c74b4e.2b23e677_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>I am preparing a = demonstr=3D ation/recital and would like to use a short questionnaire to determine = peopl=3D e attitudes or misconceptions about pipe organs and organ music. = &nbsp;&nbsp=3D ;My plan is to have people fill our the questionnaire before and after the = p=3D rogram. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>So far I have come up with the following questions: <BR>1) &nbsp;Do you think the pipe organ is a = =3DE2=3D80=3D9Csad=3DE2=3D80=3D9D sounding=3D instrument? <BR>2) &nbsp;Do you think the pipe organ has many sounds? = =3D20=3D =3D20 <BR>3) &nbsp;Do you think organ music is dull? =3D20 <BR>4) &nbsp;Do you think the pipe organ is a very difficult instrument to = p=3D lay? &nbsp; <BR>5) &nbsp;Do you think the pipe organ is a fun instrument to play? = =3D20 <BR> <BR>I'd like suggestions for further exploration into the commonly held = myth=3D s about pipe organs and organ music. <BR> <BR>The program is (tentatively): <BR>Johann Sebastian Bach was a master at demonstrating and testing new = pipe=3D organs. &nbsp;He was loved by those who attended the recitals and feared = by=3D organ builders whose <BR>instruments he put through their paces. &nbsp;&nbsp;Some of his = composit=3D ions were used for these demonstrations. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;It is possible = th=3D at in demonstrating the organ, Bach did not begin with full organ, but = began=3D with the most important stop in the organ... &nbsp;&nbsp;the Principal 8 = .. <BR> <BR>It would be fitting that the first piece played on a new instrument = migh=3D t be one written <BR>based on a Baptism hymn: &nbsp;To Jordan Came the Lord, Our Christ. = &nbs=3D p;This piece is from <BR>the Catechism Hymns which were used to teach Catechism or beliefs of = the=3D church. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The manual (or accompaniment) part gives us = movem=3D ent which can symbolize a flowing river. &nbsp;&nbsp;The hymn melody is = play=3D ed on the 4=3DE2=3D80=3D99 Principal in the Pedal Organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;The = Principal=3D stop is unique to the pipe organ and does not imitate or sound like any = oth=3D er instrument. &nbsp;It is the most gentle and warm sound that I can think = o=3D f, and is very soothing for practicing for long periods of time, and, I = thin=3D k, very appropriate for a =3DE2=3D80=3D9Cteaching=3DE2=3D80=3D9D piece. = <BR><BR>The Prin=3D cipal Chorus<BR>To demonstrate the Principal chorus, the Entree or opening = m=3D ovement of Sonata I by<BR>Alexandre Guilmant is played. &nbsp;The = Principal=3D20=3D chorus of the Great Organ is used in dialog with the Principal chorus of = the=3D Positive Organ and the Swell Organ. <BR> <BR>The Reed Chorus <BR>To demonstrate the Reed stops of the organ, a fugue based on the Kyrie = (=3D Lord, have <BR>mercy) from the Mass for the Parishes by Louis Couperin is played. = &nbsp=3D ;&nbsp;When it was written this music was used in the course of regular = wors=3D hip to enhance the liturgical text. &nbsp;Early music was written in a = plain=3D form with the assumption that the performer would add embellishments, = such=3D20=3D as trills and unequal rhythm. &nbsp;&nbsp;The fugue will be played twice, = on=3D ce as it written, and again using ornamentation which transforms it from a = s=3D tately fugue to a delightful dance, perhaps symbolic of the joy we have as = a=3D result of God=3DE2=3D80=3D99s promise of forgiveness for our sins. = &nbsp;&nbsp;Th=3D e Fagot 16 and Oboe 8 in the Swell Organ are used with the Trompete 8 in = the=3D Great Organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;French organs of this period had only a few = pedals=3D which were used as =3DE2=3D80=3D9Chelpers=3DE2=3D80=3D9D when extra low = notes were need=3D ed.<BR><BR>The Individual Stops (or voices) of the Organ<BR>Trompete = &nbsp;&=3D nbsp;&nbsp;....... &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Trumpet Tune = &nbsp;&n=3D bsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Henr=3D y Purcell <BR>Fagot 16, Oboe 8 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Penguin=3DE2=3D80=3D99s = Playtim=3D e &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D &nbsp;Nigel Ogden <BR>Krummhorn 8 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D &nbsp;A Clarinet Tune &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . = &nbsp;&nbs=3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Harrison Oxley <BR>Flute stops = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp=3D ;&nbsp;&nbsp;Scherzo for the White Rabbit &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . = &nbs=3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Nigel Ogden <BR> Accompaniment: &nbsp;&nbsp;Swell: &nbsp;Rohrflote 8, Nacthorn 4; = &nb=3D sp;Gemshorn &amp; Voix Coelestis <BR> Solos: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Gedekt 8 (Po); Quintaden 16 (Gr); = Koppelflo=3D te 4 (Po); Bordun 8 (Gr) <BR> Spitzflote 4 <BR> <BR>Full Organ <BR>Bach not only demonstrated the various stops on the organ, but also = test=3D ed the tuning system, the sensitivity of the mechanism, and the = reliability=3D20=3D of the wind system. &nbsp;&nbsp;An excellent piece for this purpose is the = T=3D occata and Fugue in d-minor by J. S. Bach. &nbsp;&nbsp;The opening toccata = d=3D emonstrates the tonal relationship of the three manual divisions to each = oth=3D er. &nbsp;&nbsp;As well, the large, arpeggiated chords on the manual with = a=3D20=3D low, wind-consuming note on the pedals, using full organ put the wind = system=3D to the test in a big way. &nbsp;The fugue tests the sensitivity of the = mech=3D anical action of the organ, as well as beautifully showing how terraced = dyna=3D mics and tonal individuality of the three manual divisions.=3D20 <BR> <BR>Just for fun . . . <BR>Weeping Willows &nbsp;&nbsp;and &nbsp;Chrysanthemums = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&=3D nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Scott Joplin <BR>Toccata and Fugue &nbsp;(Opus __) &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . = &nbsp;&nbsp;=3D &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Max Reger <BR>Carillon de Westminster &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;. . . . = &nbsp;&nbs=3D p;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Louis Vierne <BR> <BR> <BR>Comments and suggestions, please! &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Thanks. <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Ac=3D res http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D check out &nbsp;&nbsp;<A = HREF=3D3D"http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053">Vision=3D Success </A> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_b0.30c74b4e.2b23e677_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Misconception Questionnaire From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 21:44:56 EST     --part1_127.1c61c31f.2b240c28_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   Bruce wrote:       > So far I have come up with the following questions: > 1) Do you think the pipe organ is a =3DE2=3D80=3D9Csad=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = sounding > instrument? > 2) Do you think the pipe organ has many sounds? > 3) Do you think organ music is dull? > 4) Do you think the pipe organ is a very difficult > instrument to play? > 5) Do you think the pipe organ is a fun instrument to > play?     Bruce,   I feel you have a negative spin on your questions that may influence = the=3D20 answers. My suggestions:   1) Do you think the pipe organ is a "cheerful" sounding instrument? 2) (fine) 3) Do you think pipe organ music is exciting?   And you may want to ask if anyone is interested in learning to play the = pipe=3D =3D20 organ!   My 2=3DC2=3DA2.....   Victoria Hedberg-Ceruti   --part1_127.1c61c31f.2b240c28_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Bruce wrote:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> &gt; So far I have come up with the following questions:<BR> &gt; 1)&nbsp; Do you think the pipe organ is a = =3DE2=3D80=3D9Csad=3DE2=3D80=3D9D soundin=3D g<BR> &gt; instrument?<BR> &gt; 2)&nbsp; Do you think the pipe organ has many sounds?<BR> &gt; 3)&nbsp; Do you think organ music is dull?<BR> &gt; 4)&nbsp; Do you think the pipe organ is a very difficult<BR> &gt; instrument to play?<BR> &gt; 5)&nbsp; Do you think the pipe organ is a fun instrument to<BR> &gt; play?<BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce,<BR> <BR> I feel you have a negative spin on your questions that may influence the = ans=3D wers.&nbsp; My suggestions:<BR> <BR> 1)&nbsp; Do you think the pipe organ is a "cheerful" sounding = instrument?<BR=3D > 2)&nbsp; (fine)<BR> 3)&nbsp; Do you think pipe organ music is exciting?<BR> <BR> And you may want to ask if anyone is interested in learning to play the = pipe=3D organ!<BR> <BR> My 2=3DC2=3DA2.....<BR> <BR> Victoria Hedberg-Ceruti</FONT></HTML>   --part1_127.1c61c31f.2b240c28_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Winchester Cathedral From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2002 21:54:38 -0500   Dear Colin and List,   Somewhere in the back of my mind, there is a dim recollection of an = ancient Organ, the earliest such thing in England, with no stops, everything aways on full out. It was audible for miles. It seems to me this was somewhere around 900 AD, and I do believe it was at Winchester.   Ah, here is the reference from the textbook we used in "Organ Literature" class at Oberlin in the 50s, Gerald S. Bedbrook, "Keyboard Music from the Middle Ages to the Beginning of the Baroque:"   "Thus, an organ in Winchester cathedral, built in 951, and containing 400 pipes, had twenty-six bellows, which it took seventy men to blow. These seventy men evidently worked in relays. In all probability one man would work one bellows, but the work was so exhausting that each man could continue only for a short time. The bellows were pressed down either by means of a handle or by the blower standing on them. It seems that the device of weighting the bellows - so that the blower had merely to raise = the upper board and leave the weights to press it down again - was discovered only in the beginning of the sixteenth century. Another point in which the medieval organ was inferior to the hydraulus, was the absence of stops. There were, indeed, several rows of pipes, but they could not be stopped. All the pipes belonging to one key sounded always together, when that key was depressed."   There you have it.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: Colin Mitchell To: PipeChat Sent: Saturday, December 07, 2002 7:03 PM Subject: Winchester Cathedral     Hello, I don't know what make of organ was there when the Crystal Palace went up = in flames, but somewhere in the history of the organ there is a wonderful = quote about the instrument at Winchester. "Those who drew near could not bear the sound" Anyone know the source and the full version of the original? Regards, Colin Mitchell UK Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote: Indeed, the organ at Winchester Cathedral is the one from the original Crystal Palace, - I wonder what organ was there,- if any, - at the time of the Crystal Palace fire.                 With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your needs      
(back) Subject: Re: Winchester Cathedral From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2002 00:35:01 EST     --part1_93.2748b732.2b243405_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Corliss Richard Arnold writes-- "Over 200 years later Wulstan described a =   harsh sounding and loud organ, which was built in Winchester, = England,about 980. This instrument required 70 men to keep the 26 bellows filled with wind." gfc   --part1_93.2748b732.2b243405_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Corliss Richard Arnold = writes-- &nbsp;"Over 200 years later Wulstan described a harsh sounding = and loud organ, which was built in Winchester, England,about 980. = &nbsp;This instrument required 70 men to keep the 26 bellows filled with = wind." <BR>gfc</FONT></HTML>   --part1_93.2748b732.2b243405_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Winchester Cathedral From: "John Mackey" <johnmackey@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 08 Dec 2002 00:50:43 -0500   Ok Folks... Reality check here! This organ was, in all likeliness a large mixture organ which contained about 400 pipes. 40 keys, or probably sliders which controlled 10 pipes per note. I have personally been to sole supplier of wind to the 4m Taylor & Boody at Holy Cross College. This is legend! and its had 1000+ years to grow.   John Mackey     PS I do love legends though (Grin)   Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > > Corliss Richard Arnold writes-- "Over 200 years later Wulstan > described a harsh sounding and loud organ, which was built in > Winchester, England,about 980. This instrument required 70 men to > keep the 26 bellows filled with wind." > gfc  
(back) Subject: Re: Winchester Cathedral From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2002 01:20:34 EST     --part1_17b.12cc24ca.2b243eb2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   John, What you say is possible... but... Try to remember that the Taylor and Boody was built in the mid 1980's with =   the help of power tools, computers, vehicles, plastic, rubber, machine = made screws and metal parts-this all allows for a precision design and NO loss = of air.. What was the organist playing when you pumped? Full organ? Is there a blower too? Anyway-who knows- good evening, gfc   --part1_17b.12cc24ca.2b243eb2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>John, <BR>What you say is possible... <BR>but... <BR>Try to remember that the Taylor and Boody was built in the mid 1980's = with the help of power tools, computers, vehicles, plastic, rubber, = machine made screws and metal parts-this all allows for a precision design = and NO loss of air.. <BR>What was the organist playing when you pumped? &nbsp;Full organ? = &nbsp;Is there a blower too? <BR>Anyway-who knows- <BR>good evening, <BR>gfc</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17b.12cc24ca.2b243eb2_boundary--