PipeChat Digest #3296 - Friday, December 13, 2002
 
Re: Wedge; was What to Say About Careron Carpenter?
  by "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk>
What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply?
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book
  by "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com>
Technician or Musician?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Wedge; was What to Say About Careron Carpenter?
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply?
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com>
Neary & Westminster Abbey, Organ X-Plosion 2, on new Regis CDs
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: French Ornaments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Wedge; was What to Say About Careron Carpenter? From: "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 10:26:54 -0000   | From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> | Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 00:08:51 EST | | .....I heard him in Oklahoma City | with Keith Morgan and Jim Pitts at the Emmanuel Lutheran Church. It was | technically flawless.   I have never had the privilidge of hearing Felix Hell perform so my only knowledge is what I read on this and another email list where his concerts are often reviewed.   A performance description of "technically flawless" usually carries with = it the implied criticism that whilst note perfect, it perhaps lacked musical conviction or failed in some other artistic way. Is this a proper reading = of the comments from Chicaleee@aol.com?   Peter M Harrison P H M : 48 Moorfield : Edgworth Bolton : Lancs : BL7 0DH : GB fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 : tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 web: www.phmusic.co.uk    
(back) Subject: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply? From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 06:45:51 -0500   Dear Peter and List,   I must say I find the concept of "technically flawless" somehow implying "lacking musical conviction or failed in some other artistic way" quite = odd. Does this mean that performances need to be technically flawed in order to qualify as musical? In case no one else does it, let me put your concern = at rest. Felix Hell *never* lacks musical conviction. I think most who have heard him will agree. He has been known to brush the occasional note, but = it is rare, and never matters in context.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message, Concerning Felix Hell -----     > | From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> > | Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 00:08:51 EST > | > | .....I heard him in Oklahoma City > | with Keith Morgan and Jim Pitts at the Emmanuel Lutheran Church. It = was > | technically flawless. > Peter Harrison responds:   > I have never had the privilidge of hearing Felix Hell perform so my only > knowledge is what I read on this and another email list where his = concerts > are often reviewed. > > A performance description of "technically flawless" usually carries with it > the implied criticism that whilst note perfect, it perhaps lacked = musical > conviction or failed in some other artistic way. Is this a proper = reading of > the comments from Chicaleee@aol.com? > > Peter M Harrison      
(back) Subject: Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book From: "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 06:49:06 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01C2A273.BBB4EB10 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   This Advent season, I am enjoying some French Noels by various composers and could really use a book on French Ornaments. I have pulled out a copy of the famous Couperin, "Le Art de Touchere" and find that it does not have some of the ornaments that I am seeing in the pieces I am working on. Are there any recommendations from this auspicious group of keyboard musicians?     Happy Playing   JJ         ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01C2A273.BBB4EB10 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html>   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <meta name=3D3DGenerator content=3D3D"Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">   <style> <!-- /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} span.EmailStyle17 {font-family:Arial; color:windowtext;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3D3DEN-US link=3D3Dblue vlink=3D3Dpurple>   <div class=3D3DSection1>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>This Advent season, I am enjoying some French Noels =3D by various composers and could really use a book on French Ornaments.&nbsp; = =3D I have pulled out a copy of the famous </span></font><font size=3D3D2 =3D face=3D3DArial><span lang=3D3DFR =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Couperin</span></font><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>, &#8220;Le Art de </span></font><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span lang=3D3DFR =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Touchere</span></font><font size=3D3D2 =3D face=3D3DArial><span style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>&#8221; and find that it = =3D does not have some of the ornaments that I am seeing in the pieces I am working =3D on.&nbsp; Are there any recommendations from this auspicious group of keyboard =3D musicians?</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>Happy Playing</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>JJ</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Arial'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01C2A273.BBB4EB10--    
(back) Subject: Technician or Musician? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 15:09:25 +0000 (GMT)   --0-1792449877-1039792165=3D:9501 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit     Hello,   I am not entirely sure of the word-perfect version, but the harpsichordist = and exponent of Scarlatti once said, "Some of my worst performances were = those which were note perfect". (This is, in itself, a sick making = comment!)   So let us consider virtuosity for a moment.   There is the real danger that, in musical performance, technical ability = takes on a dimension all its own.....music-making degenerates into a mere = display of sporting prowess. I wonder if, in the intensity of the practice = required in the making of such performaces, there isn't just a hint of = boredom creeping in..... joy in the music has been lost to history.   On the other hand, the sloppy approach means that no understanding or = interpretation is possible in the first place.   Oddly enough, it is in improvisation that we are at our most spontaeneous = and musical, but often at the expense of technical nicety and musical = form.   So what then, is a brilliant performance?   Surely, above all, it is an act of communication between player and = listener, which gives an insight into the feelings and the intentions of = both composer an performer? If mere technical display is the art on offer, = then the performance will be a mere triviality.   Younger performers, perhaps driven by a certain hunger and naked ambition = coupled to climbing mountains "because they're there to be climbed", tend = to stretch the boundaries of their own technique and even over-reach = themselves on occasion.   The "fast and furoius" approach DOES communicate something....."I'm young = and I'm going for it!" The same approach is just as evident in young = sportsmen/women, and in life generally.....it is part of the musical = maturation process which, as we get older, we tend to forget. We've all = been there at some time or other. It's all to do with chemicals! (Legal = ones, that is!)   It is, perhaps, a little unfair to be too critical of Cameron Carpenter, = or to enter into premature judgement. I feel sure that much the same could = have been said about Carlo Curley and Virgil Fox....indeed, Carlo Curley = admits much the same in his autobiography!   Technical grasp remain important; especially in the French Romantic = repertoire, as does physical ability.......big hands and long digits help!   However, musicianship is something quite different. Members may recall my = "Dutch Dash" when I went to Alkmaar for a recital, having enjoyed a rare = example of musicianship and virtuosity from Bas de Vroom at Haarlem a = couple of days previous. There was nothing at all virtuosic or = "dazzling".....the playing was accurate, considered and styllistically = correct. It was also very, very musical and left me walking on a cloud. = At the time I asked, "Can we expect anything more of a musician than to be = musical?"   A few....a very few....having grasped techical ability at a young age, = then go on to create REAL music. It is for this reason that we have = "legends"....some well known and others who do not seek great publicity or = "put themselves about".   It is only a few times in each century that we witness a Bach, a Dupre, a = Liszt or a Germani (for example)....musicians who just "had it all".   Carlo Curley always singles out the late Sir George Thalben-Ball....a = performer of extraordinary technical ability who was also a very gifted = musician. He barely seemed to move at the console.....such economy of = effort! As a young man, he "climbed mountains", but as a wise sage, "he = moved mountains"......that is the difference!   Give Cameron Carpenter (and others) the chance to exploit technique and = dazzle us, and when he has learned to suffer the barbs, he may be the next = Virgil Fox, Germani or Thalben-Ball.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK (Still gently climbing the odd small peak)               --------------------------------- With Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits = your needs   --0-1792449877-1039792165=3D:9501 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit   <P>Hello,</P> <P>I am not entirely sure of the word-perfect version, but the = harpsichordist and exponent of Scarlatti once said, "Some of my worst = performances were those which were note perfect".&nbsp; (This is, in = itself, a sick making comment!)</P> <P>So let us consider virtuosity for a moment. </P> <P>There is the real danger that, in musical performance, technical = ability takes on a dimension all its own.....music-making degenerates into = a mere display of sporting prowess. I wonder if, in the intensity of the = practice required in the making of such performaces, there isn't just a = hint of boredom creeping in..... joy in the music has been lost to = history.</P> <P>On the other hand, the sloppy approach means that no understanding or = interpretation is possible in the first place. </P> <P>Oddly enough, it is in improvisation that we are at our most = spontaeneous and musical, but often at the expense of technical nicety and = musical form.</P> <P>So what then, is a brilliant performance?</P> <P>Surely, above all, it is an act of communication between player and = listener, which gives an insight into the feelings and the intentions of = both composer an performer? If mere technical display is the art on offer, = then the performance will be a mere triviality.</P> <P>Younger performers, perhaps driven by a certain hunger and naked = ambition coupled to climbing mountains "because they're there to be = climbed", tend to stretch the boundaries of their own technique and even = over-reach themselves on occasion.</P> <P>The "fast and furoius" approach DOES communicate something....."I'm = young and I'm going for it!"&nbsp; The same approach is just as evident in = young sportsmen/women, and in life generally.....it is part of the musical = maturation process which, as we get older, we tend to forget. We've all = been there at some time or other. It's all to do with chemicals! (Legal = ones, that is!)</P> <P>It is, perhaps, a little unfair to be too critical of Cameron = Carpenter, or to enter into premature judgement. I feel sure that much the = same could have been said about Carlo Curley and Virgil Fox....indeed, = Carlo Curley admits much the same in his autobiography!</P> <P>Technical grasp remain important; especially in the French Romantic = repertoire, as does physical ability.......big hands and long digits = help!</P> <P>However, musicianship is something quite different. Members may recall = my "Dutch Dash" when I went to Alkmaar for a recital, having enjoyed a = rare example of musicianship and virtuosity from Bas de Vroom at Haarlem a = couple of days previous. There was nothing at all virtuosic or = "dazzling".....the playing was accurate, considered and styllistically = correct. It was also very, very musical and left me walking on a cloud. = At the time I asked, "Can we expect anything more of a musician&nbsp;than = to be musical?"</P> <P>&nbsp;A few....a very few....having grasped techical ability at a young = age, then go on to create&nbsp;REAL music. It is for this reason that we = have "legends"....some well known and others&nbsp;who do not seek great = publicity or "put themselves about".</P> <P>It is only a few times in each century that we witness a Bach, = a&nbsp;Dupre, a Liszt or a Germani (for example)....musicians who just = "had it all".&nbsp; </P> <P>Carlo Curley always&nbsp;singles out the late Sir George = Thalben-Ball....a performer of extraordinary technical ability who was = also a very gifted musician. He barely seemed to move at the = console.....such economy of effort!&nbsp; As a young man, he "climbed = mountains", but as a wise sage, "he moved mountains"......that is the = difference!</P> <P>Give Cameron Carpenter (and others) the chance to exploit technique and = dazzle us, and when he has learned to suffer the barbs, he may be the next = Virgil Fox, Germani or Thalben-Ball.</P> <P>Regards,</P> <P>Colin Mitchell UK&nbsp;&nbsp; (Still gently climbing the odd small = peak)</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P><p><p><br><hr size=3D1><a = href=3D"http://uk.yahoo.com/mail/tagline_xtra/?http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/mail_storage.html"><b><font face=3D"Arial" size=3D"2">With = Yahoo! Mail you can get a bigger mailbox -- choose a size that fits your = needs</font></b></a><br> --0-1792449877-1039792165=3D:9501--  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedge; was What to Say About Careron Carpenter? From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 10:18:04 EST     --part1_a4.30d09cfa.2b2b542c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I never said the performance was not musical. I am not a trained critic = and others can write better reports about the concert than can I. Felix is = very musical, as well as technically accurate. Lee   --part1_a4.30d09cfa.2b2b542c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I never said the performance was not = musical.&nbsp; I am not a trained critic and others can write better = reports about the concert than can I.&nbsp; Felix is very musical, as well = as technically accurate.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a4.30d09cfa.2b2b542c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply? From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@attbi.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 10:43:24 -0500       Malcolm Wechsler wrote: > > Dear Peter and List, > > I must say I find the concept of "technically flawless" somehow implying > "lacking musical conviction or failed in some other artistic way" quite = odd. > Does this mean that performances need to be technically flawed in order = to > qualify as musical? In case no one else does it, let me put your concern = at > rest. Felix Hell *never* lacks musical conviction. I think most who have > heard him will agree. He has been known to brush the occasional note, = but it > is rare, and never matters in context. >   I agree. I had the privilege of hearing Felix in a recital once. A very musical and moving performance. But, judge for yourself - and if you can't hear him in person..   http://store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/felheliwnowh.html These CDs have Felix playing a range of literature on different organs.   Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Neary & Westminster Abbey, Organ X-Plosion 2, on new Regis CDs From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 11:03:00 -0500   A new budget line of CDs imported from England, the Regis label, reissues the famous and much sought CD from Westminster Abbey with Martin Neary directing, "Great Occasions from Westminster Abbey." OHS offers 23 selections from the new Regis label and they're all offered in a section that is present accessible from the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Other titles include: the second volume of Organ X-Plosion played by Kevin Bowyer Parry Organ Works Stanford Complete Sonatas Several selections sung by The Sixteen directed by Harry Christophers, including the Bach Christmas Oratorio The Bach St. Matthew and St. John Passions sung by the King's College = Choir under Cleobury A 5-CD set of early English organs played by Jennifer Bate A 4-CD set of English anthems sung by the Magdalen College Choir, John Harper, director Evensong and Vespers from King's and several others   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 12:05:30 EST     --part1_36.33d01eb8.2b2b6d5a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   What ornaments does Couperin fail to discuss? Look up other treatises from the 17th and 18th centuries. Good luck, gfc   --part1_36.33d01eb8.2b2b6d5a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>What ornaments does = Couperin fail to discuss? <BR>Look up other treatises from the 17th and 18th centuries. <BR>Good luck, <BR>gfc</FONT></HTML>   --part1_36.33d01eb8.2b2b6d5a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Need Recommendation on French Ornaments Book From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 12:06:27 EST     --part1_9d.32af0292.2b2b6d93_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear JJ:   Enjoy the music and supply the ornaments. I really don't think anyone needs a book at hand to make these colorful pieces delightful. E. Power Biggs was right, they were intended to be supplied on the fly, and is part of the charm of this kind of writing. Theory mearly explores all the possibilities, but supplying ornaments is of an improvisitory nature. You could wrack your brain and beat yourself silly, but ornaments are ment to be fun things. It was probably a reaction to the temperments of the instruments of the day just a dusting or a touch here and there pushing the envelope outward.   Does this make more sense?   Ron Severin   --part1_9d.32af0292.2b2b6d93_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear JJ:<BR> <BR> Enjoy the music and supply the ornaments. I really don't think<BR> anyone needs a book at hand to make these colorful pieces<BR> delightful. E. Power Biggs was right, they were intended to be<BR> supplied on the fly, and is part of the charm of this kind of<BR> writing. Theory mearly explores all the possibilities, but <BR> supplying ornaments is of an improvisitory nature. You could<BR> wrack your brain and beat yourself silly, but ornaments are ment<BR> to be fun things. It was probably a reaction to the temperments<BR> of the instruments of the day just a dusting or a touch here and there<BR> pushing the envelope outward.<BR> <BR> Does this make more sense?<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9d.32af0292.2b2b6d93_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: French Ornaments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 14:08:59 EST     --part1_16e.187d9794.2b2b8a4b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Pipechatters:   As a general statement, there are those who play and get stuck in the small details of performance and forget to relax and make music. Certain personality types do this almost to a fault. I think it's a mistaken desire to be better than the next guy. We've all heard this kind of playing from time to time. Don't get me wrong accuracy is important, but it can also develop into a fetish where the performance is also painful to listen to. Articulation taken to the enth degree of exaggeration especially in a dry room, where a more legato approach would work better. Clarity of counterpoint is one thing, but can become quickly an ugly characature if exaggerated. I call this the pistol shot approach. You could drive an eighteen wheeler inbetween each note. Tempered with musical logic and maturity, articulation develops into a good thing. Excessive speed also results from the pistol shot approach. Music is elastic, an ebb and flow from cadence to half cadence to cadence. it should be free, beautiful, spontaneous and lovely, sumptious, and delightful to listen to. Music is an alive and elastic movement of tones and rhythms, an elegant thing of beauty. Anything else is a technical display of tight, prissy ugliness, or sloppy inaccuracy at the other end of the spectrum. Music should simply float in air and ravish, and carry the soul away with its beauty.   French music is no exception.   Ron Severin   --part1_16e.187d9794.2b2b8a4b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Pipechatters:<BR> <BR> As a general statement, there are those who play and get stuck<BR> in the small details of performance and forget to relax and make<BR> music. Certain personality types do this almost to a fault. I think<BR> it's a mistaken desire to be better than the next guy. We've all<BR> heard this kind of playing from time to time. Don't get me wrong<BR> accuracy is important, but it can also develop into a fetish where<BR> the performance is also painful to listen to. Articulation taken to<BR> the enth degree of exaggeration especially in a dry room, where<BR> a more legato approach&nbsp; would work better. Clarity of = counterpoint<BR> is one thing, but can become quickly an ugly characature if<BR> exaggerated. I call this the pistol shot approach. You could<BR> drive an eighteen wheeler inbetween each note. Tempered with<BR> musical logic and maturity, articulation develops into a good thing.<BR> Excessive speed also results from the pistol shot approach. Music<BR> is elastic, an ebb and flow from cadence to half cadence to cadence.<BR> it should be free, beautiful, spontaneous and lovely, sumptious, and<BR> delightful to listen to. Music is an alive and elastic movement of <BR> tones and rhythms, an elegant thing of beauty. Anything else is<BR> a technical display of tight, prissy ugliness, or sloppy inaccuracy<BR> at the other end of the spectrum. Music should simply float in<BR> air and ravish, and carry the soul away with its beauty.<BR> <BR> French music is no exception.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_16e.187d9794.2b2b8a4b_boundary--