PipeChat Digest #3297 - Friday, December 13, 2002
 
Ornaments, Felix, Cameron and life
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Technicians or Musicians
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net>
French Ornaments
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply?
  by "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk>
Technically Flawless
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Technically Flawless
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Technically Flawless
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Technically Flawless
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Ornaments, Felix, Cameron and life From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 13:33:00 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0003_01C2A2AC.3073B840 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have to agree with Ron on this one. Back in 1996 I went to a George Ritchie masterclass on Bach (not French) ornaments, thinking I would get a definitive "when you see this mark, you ALWAYS do this" ( a la Schweitzer) on ornaments. However, he discussed various ways the trills, mordents, turns and arpeggios have been interpreted, and encouraged us to explore. At first I was upset, my orderly world craved orthodoxy and didacticism. However, through time I have realized that interpretation of ornaments by the performer can really be a charming signature, and one of the ways by which I categorize performers as artists or mere technicians.     To tie this in to the Felix Hell and Cameron Carpenter threads which Malcolm started and I inadvertently through my question aggravated, technical brilliance is to be coveted - musicality doesn't go far if one plays a lot of wrong notes at the wrong time (and Bach for one would not be pleased). However, age and life experiences help to mold our interpretations of the music. The first time I heard Felix live, he was technically brilliant but just a kid prodigy. Another year of study had girded him with an amazing amount of maturity and ability of expression. Now, a year plus later, I am very much looking forward to hear him yet again, to see what of himself and his studies and experience comes through in the music. It is quite exciting to see someone with Felix' extraordinary talent and drive "grow up" with the music, and to hear him playing the pieces at various ages and to hear them evolving, while at the same time watching/hearing his constant expansion of repertoire and reaching ever farther. I hope and expect that this will also occur in the case of Cameron Carpenter, whom I have not heard.     Cheers from the incoherent one on this blustery day,     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of RonSeverin@aol.com Enjoy the music and supply the ornaments. I really don't think anyone needs a book at hand to make these colorful pieces delightful. E. Power Biggs was right, they were intended to be supplied on the fly, and is part of the charm of this kind of writing. Theory mearly explores all the possibilities, but supplying ornaments is of an improvisitory nature. You could wrack your brain and beat yourself silly, but ornaments are ment to be fun things. It was probably a reaction to the temperments of the instruments of the day just a dusting or a touch here and there pushing the envelope outward.     ------=3D_NextPart_000_0003_01C2A2AC.3073B840 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <html>   <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Dus-ascii">     <meta name=3D3DGenerator content=3D3D"Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">   <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Footlight MT Light"; panose-1:2 4 6 2 6 3 10 2 3 4;} @font-face {font-family:Tahoma; panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;} @font-face {font-family:"Colonna MT"; panose-1:4 2 8 5 6 2 2 3 2 3;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} p.MsoEnvelopeReturn, li.MsoEnvelopeReturn, div.MsoEnvelopeReturn {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Footlight MT Light";} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {color:blue; text-decoration:underline;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple; text-decoration:underline;} p.MsoAutoSig, li.MsoAutoSig, div.MsoAutoSig {margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} span.emailstyle18 {font-family:Arial; color:blue; font-weight:normal; font-style:normal; text-decoration:none none;} span.EmailStyle20 {font-family:Arial; color:blue;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style>   </head>   <body lang=3D3DEN-US link=3D3Dblue vlink=3D3Dpurple>   <div class=3D3DSection1>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue face=3D3DArial =3D FAMILY=3D3DSANSSERIF><span style=3D3D'font-size:12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>I have to agree = =3D with Ron on this one.&nbsp; Back in 1996 I went to a George Ritchie masterclass =3D on Bach (not French) ornaments, thinking I would get a definitive &#8220;when =3D you see this mark, you ALWAYS do this&#8221; ( a la Schweitzer) on =3D ornaments.&nbsp; However, he discussed various ways the trills, mordents, turns and =3D arpeggios have been interpreted, and encouraged us to explore.&nbsp; At first I =3D was upset, my orderly world craved orthodoxy and didacticism.&nbsp; However, through time I have realized that interpretation of ornaments by the =3D performer can really be a charming signature, and one of the ways by which I =3D categorize performers as artists or mere technicians.</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>To tie this in to the Felix Hell =3D and Cameron Carpenter threads which Malcolm started and I inadvertently =3D through my question aggravated, technical brilliance is to be coveted &#8211; =3D musicality doesn&#8217;t go far if one plays a lot of wrong notes at the wrong time = =3D (and Bach for one would not be pleased).&nbsp; However, age and life =3D experiences help to mold our interpretations of the music.&nbsp; The first time I =3D heard Felix live, he was technically brilliant but just a kid prodigy.&nbsp; =3D Another year of study had girded him with an amazing amount of maturity and =3D ability of expression.&nbsp;&nbsp; Now, a year plus later, I am very much looking =3D forward to hear him yet again, to see what of himself and his studies and =3D experience comes through in the music.&nbsp; It is quite exciting to see someone =3D with Felix&#8217; extraordinary talent and drive &#8220;grow up&#8221; with =3D the music, and to hear him playing the pieces at various ages and to hear =3D them evolving, while at the same time watching/hearing his constant expansion = =3D of repertoire and reaching ever farther.&nbsp; I hope and expect that this will also =3D occur in the case of Cameron Carpenter, whom I have not heard.</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>Cheers from the incoherent one on =3D this blustery day,</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <div>   <p class=3D3DMsoAutoSig><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue face=3D3D"Colonna = =3D MT"><span style=3D3D'font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Colonna =3D MT";color:blue'>Glenda</span></font><font color=3D3Dblue face=3D3D"Colonna MT"><span style=3D3D'font-family:"Colonna = =3D MT";color:blue'> Sutton</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoAutoSig><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue face=3D3D"Colonna = =3D MT"><span style=3D3D'font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Colonna =3D MT";color:blue'>gksjd85@direcway.com</span></font></p>   </div>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3D3 color=3D3Dblue = face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:blue'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>   <p class=3D3DMsoNormal =3D style=3D3D'margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:12.0pt;margin-left: ..5in'><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DTahoma><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'>-----Original Message-----<br> <b><span style=3D3D'font-weight:bold'>From:</span></b> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] <b><span style=3D3D'font-weight:bold'>On = =3D Behalf Of </span></b></span></font><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DTahoma><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'>RonSeverin@aol.com</span></= =3D font><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DTahoma><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'><br> </span></font><font size=3D3D2 face=3D3DArial><span =3D style=3D3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family: Arial'>&nbsp;<br> Enjoy the music and supply the ornaments. I really don't think<br> anyone needs a book at hand to make these colorful pieces<br> delightful. E. Power Biggs was right, they were intended to be<br> supplied on the fly, and is part of the charm of this kind of<br> writing. Theory mearly explores all the possibilities, but <br> supplying ornaments is of an improvisitory nature. You could<br> wrack your brain and beat yourself silly, but ornaments are ment<br> to be fun things. It was probably a reaction to the temperments<br> of the instruments of the day just a dusting or a touch here and =3D there<br> pushing the envelope outward.</span></font></p>   </div>   </body>   </html>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0003_01C2A2AC.3073B840--      
(back) Subject: Re: Technicians or Musicians From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 12:56:07 -0700   >Give Cameron Carpenter (and others) the chance to exploit technique and dazzle us, and when he has learned to suffer the barbs, he >may be the = next Virgil Fox, Germani or Thalben-Ball.   I had the pleasure of attending half a Cameron Carpenter recital. I'll = say this for him -- he's got chutzpah and showmanship! He connects very well with the audience, especially the non-organists. If we all did that, = there might be gigger audiences.   It will be interesting to see what comes of this young man as he matures.   D      
(back) Subject: French Ornaments From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 11:58:15 -0800 (PST)   Hi, all--   Couperin's "L'art de toucher le clavecin" is an invaluable resource, but only describes Couperin's own ornaments--and almost every composer seems to have had his own vocabulary of ornaments then, complete with a unique notation system. So Couperin's symbols don't necessarily apply to, say, d'Aquin...and later in the tradition, say by Balbastre, all the niceties of convention begin to break down anyway.   (At the court of Louis XIV, ladies would apply little black spots, or 'beauty marks,' to their faces. Depending on the location, they had a specific name, meaning, and often political affiliation. This propensity for extreme taxonimizing was peculiar to the era and ornaments are no exception.)   The ideal solution is to find that particular composer's own "table des enseignements" or whatever it's called and use it. Failing that, it's probably OK to substitute a generic ornament, such as a mordent, for the unknown symbol. Many recent editions (including the affordable ones, alas!) omit this prefatory matter.   The tradition does seem to lean in one direction it is helpful to mention: that organ music is usually played more conservatively and with less gaiety than harpsichord music. This is true even though French organ music is more deeply influenced by the conventions of opera and ballet than any other part of our repertoire.     Here--I just searched the Indiana University catalog and came up with quite a bibliography...happy reading!   --Jon   Essays in performance practice Neumann, Frederick. Ann Arbor, Mich. : UMI Research Press, c1982.     Ornamentation : a question & answer manual Lloyd-Watts, Valery. [Van Nuys, Calif.] : Alfred Pub. Co., c1995.   Inequality in classical French music ; Ornamentation in classical French organ music Kooiman, Ewald, Dr. Devon : John Loosemore Association ; Cambridge : Distributed by Early Music Centre Publications, c1988.   Ornamentation in baroque and post-baroque music : with special emphasis on J. S. Bach Neumann, Frederick. Princeton : Princeton University Press, 1978   Embellishing sixteenth-century music Brown, Howard Mayer. London : Oxford University Press, [1976]   Interpretation of French music from 1675 to 1775 for woodwind and other performers. Additional comments on German and Italian music Mather, Betty Bang. New York, McGinnis & Marx Music Publishers, 1973.   The interpretation of the music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, revealed by contemporary evidence Dolmetsch, Arnold, 1858-1940. Seattle, University of Washington Press [1969]   The principal agr=E9ments of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries [microform] : a study of musical ornamentation Aldrich, Putnam. [Cambridge, Mass., Harvard College Library] 1942.   Trait=E9 des signes et agr=E9ments employ=E9s par les clavecinistes = fran=E7ais des XVIIe et XVIIIe si=E8cles Brunold, Paul, 1875-1948. Lyon, Les =C9ditions musicales Janin, 1925. ------------------------------------------  
(back) Subject: Re: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply? From: "Peter Harrison" <peter@phmusic.co.uk> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 20:52:36 -0000   Dear Malcolm and list,   Malcolm Wechsler's comment about Mr Hell's playing is very reassuring and backs up the reviews he has often provided. I look forward to the chance = to hear him live some day.   It is absurd to suggest a performance must be technically flawed to be musical. However limiting the description of "flawless" to only one particular facet, in this case the technical performance, leaves all other aspects without any description of their quality. When a reviewer = restricts his praise to just a single aspect, readers are left to speculate that the other aspects did not justify the same level of praise. "He's good at driving in straight lines" whilst superficially a commendation, might be a criticism of a driver who drove off the road at a bend! It is what is sometimes called a "backhanded complement"!   If the praise is meant to be unrestricted, the word "flawless" on its own = is one way to convey that all aspects are without defects. Once the word is qualified in any way, it limits the flawlessness to the particular facet described.   Peter M Harrison P H M : 48 Moorfield : Edgworth Bolton : Lancs : BL7 0DH : GB fax: +44 (0)1204 853445 : tel: +44 (0)1204 853310 web: www.phmusic.co.uk       | Subject: What Does "Technically Flawless" Mean or Imply? | From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> | Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 06:45:51 -0500 | | Dear Peter and List, | | I must say I find the concept of "technically flawless" somehow | implying | "lacking musical conviction or failed in some other artistic way" | quite odd. | Does this mean that performances need to be technically flawed in | order to | qualify as musical? In case no one else does it, let me put your | concern at | rest. Felix Hell *never* lacks musical conviction. I think most who | have | heard him will agree. He has been known to brush the occasional note, | but it | is rare, and never matters in context. | | Cheers, | | Malcolm Wechsler | www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: Technically Flawless From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 17:51:59 EST     --part1_25.32752932.2b2bbe8f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   I've not used the term "technically flawless", but I've tended to refer to =   somebody's playing as being very mechanical. It was said about the = organist where I grew up that she was so precise in her playing that, if there were = a fly speck on the page, she'd play it too.   I'm not sure what the author whose posting triggered this thread meant by = the term, but I'm thinking s/he meant to convey the idea that an organist can play every single note of a piece of music perfectly, but still have a = very boring piece that's not very artistic. IOW, to me, there's more to = playing a piece of music than just getting all the notes right.   Some of you probably hate analogies, but please allow me this one (no, = it's not a sermon this time). If you enjoy watching the olympic figure = skating, you'll occasionally notice some young skaters who can jump very high, do = all those fancy spins and other moves very impressively, but there is some element lacking in their performance than causes them to score a fraction = of a point below a more mature skater who might have even had a little = slip-up in his/her performance. This element, to me, is the "artistry" part. The =   more mature (not necessarily older) skater has a smooth, artistic way of connecting all these "technical" elements in a smooth and flowing way into = a beautiful performance.   How this applies to keyboard performance..... a performance that is "technically flawless" might sound as if the piece of music were fed into = a slot on a droid (humanoid) which then pressed the keys and pedals = perfectly as the notes were printed on the paper. No one could argue that the = timing and notes were not correct.   A more artistic performance might include very subtle pauses, accents, = rubato playing, etc. that contribute to the "interpretation" of the piece. We've =   probably all played the same piece different ways depending upon what kind = of mood we were in at the time.   No, for a performance to be "artistic", one doesn't have to introduce = flaws or mistakes into the playing. Maybe it's like having one's feet "dance" = thru a particularly challenging pedal passage as opposed to clomping thru it. Maybe it's a slight ritard. or accel. in a particular section that might = not have actually been printed.   For some of us, we might prefer to listen to a very "artistic" = interpretation of a particular piece - that seems to convey, in a musical fashion, = perhaps what the composer was trying to express thru the composition - that may include a "little mistake or two" than a performance of the same piece = with no "wrong notes" but sounds as if it's played from a piano roll.   Well, that's my thoughts on the matter. Keith Zimmerman Commerce, Georgia   --part1_25.32752932.2b2bbe8f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>List, <BR> <BR>I've not used the term "technically flawless", but I've tended to = refer to somebody's playing as being very mechanical. &nbsp;It was said = about the organist where I grew up that she was so precise in her playing = that, if there were a fly speck on the page, she'd play it too. <BR> <BR>I'm not sure what the author whose posting triggered this thread meant = by the term, but I'm thinking s/he meant to convey the idea that an = organist can play every single note of a piece of music perfectly, but = still have a very boring piece that's not very artistic. &nbsp;IOW, to me, = there's more to playing a piece of music than just getting all the notes = right. <BR> <BR>Some of you probably hate analogies, but please allow me this one (no, = it's not a sermon this time). &nbsp;If you enjoy watching the olympic = figure skating, you'll occasionally notice some young skaters who can jump = very high, do all those fancy spins and other moves very impressively, but = there is some element lacking in their performance than causes them to score a fraction of a point below a more mature = skater who might have even had a little slip-up in his/her performance. = &nbsp;This element, to me, is the "artistry" part. &nbsp;The more mature = (not necessarily older) skater has a smooth, artistic way of connecting = all these "technical" elements in a smooth and flowing way into a = beautiful performance. <BR> <BR>How this applies to keyboard performance..... a performance that is = "technically flawless" might sound as if the piece of music were fed into = a slot on a droid (humanoid) which then pressed the keys and pedals = perfectly as the notes were printed on the paper. &nbsp;No one could argue = that the timing and notes were not correct. <BR> <BR>A more artistic performance might include very subtle pauses, accents, = rubato playing, etc. that contribute to the "interpretation" of the piece. = &nbsp;We've probably all played the same piece different ways depending = upon what kind of mood we were in at the time. <BR> <BR>No, for a performance to be "artistic", one doesn't have to introduce = flaws or mistakes into the playing. &nbsp;Maybe it's like having one's = feet "dance" thru a particularly challenging pedal passage as opposed to = clomping thru it. &nbsp;Maybe it's a slight ritard. or accel. in a = particular section that might not have actually been printed. <BR> <BR>For some of us, we might prefer to listen to a very "artistic" = interpretation of a particular piece - that seems to convey, in a musical = fashion, perhaps what the composer was trying to express thru the = composition - that may include a "little mistake or two" than a = performance of the same piece with no "wrong notes" but sounds as if it's = played from a piano roll. <BR> <BR>Well, that's my thoughts on the matter. <BR>Keith Zimmerman <BR>Commerce, Georgia</FONT></HTML>   --part1_25.32752932.2b2bbe8f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Technically Flawless From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 19:23:49 EST     --part1_172.1334a8ea.2b2bd415_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   My post which included "technically flawless" was in reference to a post asking about the playing of Felix Hell playing "The Wedge" by Bach. It = was indeed artistic, as is all his playing. I now bow to the more erudite critics of organ music to review the concert. Malcolm has heard Mr. Hell, = as has Mr. Morgan and Mr. Pitts, and Peter, who is at OCU. If you have any more questions about his playing of this particularly piece, please = address your post to them. Lee   --part1_172.1334a8ea.2b2bd415_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">My post which included "technically flawless" = was in reference to a post asking about the playing of Felix Hell playing = "The Wedge" by Bach.&nbsp; It was indeed artistic, as is all his = playing.&nbsp; I now bow to the more erudite critics of organ music to = review the concert.&nbsp; Malcolm has heard Mr. Hell, as has Mr. Morgan = and Mr. Pitts, and Peter, who is at OCU.&nbsp; If you&nbsp; have any more = questions about his playing of this particularly piece, please address = your post to them.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_172.1334a8ea.2b2bd415_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Technically Flawless From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 19:38:36 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3122653116_32491 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 12/13/02 7:23 PM, "Chicaleee@aol.com" <Chicaleee@aol.com> wrote:   > My post which included "technically flawless" was in reference to a post > asking about the playing of Felix Hell playing "The Wedge" by Bach. It = w=3D as > indeed artistic, as is all his playing. I now bow to the more erudite = cr=3D itics > of organ music to review the concert. Malcolm has heard Mr. Hell, as = has=3D Mr. > Morgan and Mr. Pitts, and Peter, who is at OCU. If you have any more > questions about his playing of this particularly piece, please address = yo=3D ur > post to them. Lee   Lee, this has been the funniest thing. You used that perfectly innocent expression, and you got jumped on from all directions. Well, YOU = didn=3DB9t ge=3D t jumped on, but your expression did. Actually, it=3DB9s been a productive thread, but it looked like a =3DB3Kill Lee=3DB2 thing for a while there. = It was ridiculous. (Of course, I know no one meant it that way.) In any case, FORGET IT. Your innocent phrase got jumped on, but you should not worry about it. It turned out to be an interesting and productive = thread=3D8Bwhateve=3D r its origin. And now it will die. You=3DB9re just an innocent bystander.   OK?   Alan   --B_3122653116_32491 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Technically Flawless</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 12/13/02 7:23 PM, = &quot;Chicaleee@aol.com&q=3D uot; &lt;Chicaleee@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">My post which = included=3D &quot;technically flawless&quot; was in reference to a post asking about = th=3D e playing of Felix Hell playing &quot;The Wedge&quot; by Bach. &nbsp;It = was =3D indeed artistic, as is all his playing. &nbsp;I now bow to the more = erudite =3D critics of organ music to review the concert. &nbsp;Malcolm has heard Mr. = He=3D ll, as has Mr. Morgan and Mr. Pitts, and Peter, who is at OCU. &nbsp;If = you =3D &nbsp;have any more questions about his playing of this particularly = piece, =3D please address your post to them. &nbsp;Lee</FONT></FONT><FONT = FACE=3D3D"Times N=3D ew Roman"> <BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><BR> Lee, this has been the funniest thing. &nbsp;You used that perfectly = innoce=3D nt expression, and you got jumped on from all directions. &nbsp;Well, YOU = di=3D dn&#8217;t get jumped on, but your expression did. &nbsp;Actually, = it&#8217;=3D s been a productive thread, but it looked like a &#8220;Kill Lee&#8221; = thin=3D g for a while there. &nbsp;It was ridiculous. &nbsp;(Of course, I know no = on=3D e meant it that way.) &nbsp;In any case, FORGET IT. &nbsp;Your innocent = phra=3D se got jumped on, but you should not worry about it. &nbsp;It turned out = to =3D be an interesting and productive thread&#8212;whatever its origin. = &nbsp;And=3D now it will die. &nbsp;You&#8217;re just an innocent bystander.<BR> <BR> OK?<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3122653116_32491--    
(back) Subject: Re: Technically Flawless From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2002 20:34:07 -0500   Dear Lee, As much as I hate to see anyone's posted remarks become a football to be passed, carried and kicked around like yours did, I suggest you look at the positive stimulation it caused, and the lessons we all learned as a result. Like Alan said, I don't think any of it was pointed at you personally, just at your choice of words. I can tell you that the study of implied meaning has been most prominent in my thinking of late, due to a bad experience that cost me the friendship of a dear friend. I am no longer so quick to jump to conclusions as a result. Perhaps you might be jumping to a wrong conclusion here as well, thinking that you were attacked. As Alan said, it is over now, and I would hope you will not come away feeling hesitant about posting again. I, for one, enjoy reading what you have to say, and would miss you indeed. All My Best Mike   Alan Freed wrote:   > On 12/13/02 7:23 PM, "Chicaleee@aol.com" > <Chicaleee@aol.com> wrote: > > > My post which included "technically > flawless" was in reference to a post asking > about the playing of Felix Hell playing > "The Wedge" by Bach. It was indeed > artistic, as is all his playing. I now bow > to the more erudite critics of organ music > to review the concert. Malcolm has heard > Mr. Hell, as has Mr. Morgan and Mr. Pitts, > and Peter, who is at OCU. If you have any > more questions about his playing of this > particularly piece, please address your > post to them. Lee > > > Lee, this has been the funniest thing. You used that > perfectly innocent expression, and you got jumped on > from all directions. Well, YOU didn=92t get jumped on, > but your expression did. Actually, it=92s been a > productive thread, but it looked like a =93Kill Lee=94 > thing for a while there. It was ridiculous. (Of > course, I know no one meant it that way.) In any > case, FORGET IT. Your innocent phrase got jumped on, > but you should not worry about it. It turned out to > be an interesting and productive thread=97whatever its > origin. And now it will die. You=92re just an > innocent bystander. > > OK? > > Alan