PipeChat Digest #3299 - Saturday, December 14, 2002
 
Making Music
  by "morton belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Technically flawless
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
making music
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Making Music
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Technically Flawless
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: making music
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: Making Music
  by "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl>
RE: making music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Making Music
  by "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Making Music
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Free Christmas music
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net>
Re: Free Christmas music
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Making Music
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Free Christmas music
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Making Music From: "morton belcher" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 04:53:24 -0800 (PST)   Ladies and Gentlemen of the List:   I would like to raise a question ...   When a teacher says something like, "You're not making music," or, "Half of what you play is only playing notes, and not music," what exactly is meant by "making music?"   I'm a bit embarrased to say that these comments were made to me by two teachers...   Teacher number one was a teacher I had while studying the organ in my senior high school years (now deceased).   Teacher number two was a teacher I had while studying in graduate school (I was not a music graduate student, but I took organ while in graduate school, because (1) I didn't want to pass up an opportunity to take organ lessons at a reasonable tuition rate and (2) it seemed to be the easiest way to use any of the university organs (at that time a 3 rank Wicks Classic then used as a practice organ, a 3 rank early 1950s Moller Artiste also used as a practice organ, and a 1969 13 rank or so Moller organ in the small university chapel. Teacher number two, who is getting along in years, is I suspect, about to retire, as I have seen an advertisement in at least one of the organ magazines advertising the org/chm position at the church where this teacher has played for so many years...   Although both instructors went out of their way to be helpful, each could have, shall we say, um, temper tantrums upon occasion; thus I just listened to them on these two occasions and nodded my head ever so slightly... I was hoping that both of these mentors would explain their point of view on the subject of what exactly is meant by "making music", but such was not to be, perhaps because of the time limitation of the two specific lessons when they made these statements...   At any rate, I have raised this question with other colleagues and have received various answers... I would now like to raise this question with the members of this list... Since I'm the individual raising the question, if you do not care to post your opinion to the list, feel free to e-mail me directly, if you want, at this e-mail address: littlebayus@yahoo.com   Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher       __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now. http://mailplus.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Technically flawless From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 09:05:47 EST     --part1_103.21a77f92.2b2c94bb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Peter said, "I have to admit to being one who reassures himself that if my =   playing has any merit, it must be on the artistic side as the technical is = so horribly flawed! Peter"   That's how I view my own playing. I get very frustrated with my technical =   limitations (mainly due to lack of formal training as well as waiting to = the last minute to practice). A few people at church keep telling me to go = easy on myself because nobody ever notices my mistakes. Fortunately or unfortunately, that's because there are so few people in my church who = "know" music. They get caught up in the artistry and can enjoy the music without =   regard to how technically correct it is.   I missed the original posting on this thread as well as whatever = derrogatory comments were made, so I'm not sure what really got out of hand.   In my mind, I consider "technical ability" to be playing the notes = correctly. "Artistic ability" is playing the music well. IOW, evaluating the "technical" aspect is like looking at individual shrubs or trees; = evaluating the "artistic" aspect is like stepping back to view the entire landscape plan.   There is a certain amount of lattitude in both - and the amount granted, = and in which area, is often determined by the audience.   What comments I've read seem to indicate that the poster was not wishing = to sacrifice technical ability for artistry, nor was he indicating that they = are mutually exclusive. In real life, it seems that performers seem to have a =   great degree of one over the other. It's unusual, but refreshing and exciting, to find a performer who excels in both.   The lesson for me - one that I beat myself over frequently - is that my = area of weakness is the technical aspect, and that is where I need to = concentrate my practice.   Merry Christmas, Keith Zimmerman     --part1_103.21a77f92.2b2c94bb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"arial" LANG=3D"0">Peter said, "I have to admit to being one who = reassures himself that if my playing has any merit, it must be on the = artistic side as the technical is so horribly flawed!<BR> Peter"<BR> <BR> That's how I view my own playing.&nbsp; I get very frustrated with my = technical limitations (mainly due to lack of formal training as well as = waiting to the last minute to practice).&nbsp; A few people at church keep = telling me to go easy on myself because nobody ever notices my = mistakes.&nbsp; Fortunately or unfortunately, that's because there are so = few people in my church who "know" music.&nbsp; They get caught up in the = artistry and can enjoy the music without regard to how technically correct = it is.<BR> <BR> I missed the original posting on this thread as well as whatever = derrogatory comments were made, so I'm not sure what really got out of = hand.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> In my mind, I consider "technical ability" to be playing the notes = correctly.&nbsp; "Artistic ability" is playing the music well.&nbsp; IOW, = evaluating the "technical" aspect is like looking at individual shrubs or = trees; evaluating the "artistic" aspect is like stepping back to view the = entire landscape plan.<BR> <BR> There is a certain amount of lattitude in both - and the amount granted, = and in which area, is often determined by the audience.<BR> <BR> What comments I've read seem to indicate that the poster was not wishing = to sacrifice technical ability for artistry, nor was he indicating that = they are mutually exclusive.&nbsp; In real life, it seems that performers = seem to have a great degree of one over the other.&nbsp; It's unusual, but = refreshing and exciting, to find a performer who excels in both.<BR> <BR> The lesson for me - one that I beat myself over frequently - is that my = area of weakness is the technical aspect, and that is where I need to = concentrate my practice.<BR> <BR> Merry Christmas,<BR> Keith Zimmerman<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_103.21a77f92.2b2c94bb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: making music From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 06:44:50 -0800   Hmmm ... most of my formal study was with a teacher who planned and marked EVERYTHING ahead of time. I myself never rose much above "workmanlike" performances of organ literature ... right notes, good rhythm, good articulation, etc., but not a whole lot of "inspiration". I'm not sure that was entirely due to my teacher's approach, but I think it might have had something to do with it.   OTOH, my service-playing has often been remarked upon ... I wonder if it's because when I go to the organ to play a SERVICE, I just have fun and do whatever strikes me at the time, for the most part. Oh, I may think through the improvisations, etc. while I'm driving to church, and set a few pistons when I get there, but that's really about it.   I would offer this comment: in conservatory, I wasn't particularly interested in a lot of the music I was required to study ... nor was it particularly useful once I got out into the "real world." I think one of the consequences of THAT was that I never really made it MINE ... never really got emotionally involved with it. NOW, forty years later, I tend to play simple but atmospheric pieces, including (gasp!) transcriptions, that DO engage both me AND the congregation, and which fit the "feel" of our services.   The same thing has happened with my approach to choir repertoire ... for YEARS I struggled to get choirs to sing what they were "supposed" to sing according to the conventional wisdom of the time, with varying degrees of success. In one instance, I had an all-paid professional choir that was quite capable of singing Palestrina, Mozart, Haydn Masses, etc. every Sunday, and we DID, from September through May ... but invariably the COMPLIMENTS came in the summer when we suspended week-day rehearsals, met for a short time before Mass, let our hair down, and sang the well-beloved pre-Vatican-II repertoire ... Singenberger, Schehl, Gruber, Rehm, Gounod, Griesbacher (grin), Perosi (yes, Perosi), Yon, etc.   I've created something of a monster at my present parish (grin) ... the Christmas Eve Mass will include Gregorian Mass IX (Missa Marialis), settings of the Propers by Dr. Willan, and an attractive "Alleluia! Christ Is Born" that I transcribed from Gruber, BUT ... in lieu of a closing voluntary, the choir will also sing "Awakening Chorus" (Charles Gabriel) with Christmas words. I let them do it ONCE; it promptly became a TRADITION (grin). They have GREAT fun singing it; the congregation LOVES it; as long as I get to do Willan and Chant TOO, I indulge them.   I can just see all the Anglican organist on here throwing their surplices over their heads in horror (grin), but I would point out that I enjoy a VERY high degree of support from both my choir AND my congregation, and I think it's due to the mix of music we do. My choir sings certain things (mostly Victoriana) VERY well, and to bring it back to the subject of the thread, they MAKE MUSIC when they DO.   Find what you LIKE, and make THAT yours, and the music-making will come along.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Making Music From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 09:47:20 EST   In a message dated 12/14/02 7:54:29 AM Eastern Standard Time, littlebayus@yahoo.com writes:   << When a teacher says something like, "You're not making music," or, "Half of what you play is only playing notes, and not music," what exactly is meant by "making music?" >>   The following was recently sent to another list I'm on. At the moment, my =   computer isn't capable of playback, but after reading the comments about = it, I believe it gives a good indication of what you teachers meant. What = you're hearing from this is just a mechanical reproduction of the notes and = rhythms, without any musical thought.   >> I came across this today- take a listen at it. Perfect rhythmic >> accuracy, and all the notes right, but no music whatsoever. I couldn't = sit >> through the whole thing without laughing.   >> http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/music/18_cent/marcello/marcello.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Technically Flawless From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 10:41:33 -0500   In a message dated 12/13/2002 10:36:11 PM Eastern Standard Time, = Innkawgneeto@cs.com writes:   > > So many folks, it seems to me particulary in this day and age, want to = rush to the artistic side of things before they > are technically able to negotiate the music successfully. > > Neil by the Rainy Bay   I think the opposite is true more often. Many young players whip off many = a technically challenging piece before they have it down artistically.   Merry  
(back) Subject: Re: making music From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 10:45:40 -0500   In a message dated 12/14/2002 9:44:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, = quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > > Find what you LIKE, and make THAT yours, and the > music-making will come > along. > > Cheers, > > Bud   amen!!!  
(back) Subject: Re: Making Music From: "Marek Miskowicz" <miskow@uci.agh.edu.pl> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 17:06:18 +0100 (CET)       On Sat, 14 Dec 2002, morton belcher wrote:   > Ladies and Gentlemen of the List: > > I would like to raise a question ... > > When a teacher says something like, "You're not making > music," or, "Half of what you play is only playing > notes, and not music," what exactly is meant by > "making music?"   In my opinion advices like that: "Play beautiful!", "You are not making music" are, to put it midly, not valuable in general for students. The teacher should show the concrete hints WHAT TO DO in order to play "beautifully" or WHY the performence is not satisfying. The reasons could be various: a student does not know enough the notes, does not understand a music, it could be unsuitable articulation, touch, phraising etc. I am an organ teacher as well and I avoid remarks such that: "You are not making music", because students can think: "Maybe I am not musical enough" It could lead to depression. If the playing is bad I try to find what is a general problem. If I can't find the essence of a problem I think: "My fault is larger than my student's fault. He played it bad but I don't know why".   Maybe this example is too idealistic (my students can have different impression in relation to my teaching), but I think it is the right idea.   Regards,   Marek Miskowicz Cracow, Poland      
(back) Subject: RE: making music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 10:34:47 -0600   I think Bud (good to hear from you again!) hit the nail on the head. I remember my teacher once telling me I didn't "love" my music, and I retorted that it was a first date - we weren't even going steady!   I think the technical and the artistic go hand in hand - one has to know the intricacies of the musical score so well before one can make it his or her own. That's probably why memorization is such a good tool. I for one cannot enjoy the artistic if the technical is not there - I'm sitting there mentally wanting to push the performer off the bench and do it myself, sightreading if I must, whether or not I can do a better job. I believe the listener wants to also become one with the music and not be distracted.   Gotta go - lots to do to get ready for Rick's dinner party tonight.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com   .. . . .   I would offer this comment: in conservatory, I wasn't particularly interested in a lot of the music I was required to study ... nor was it particularly useful once I got out into the "real world." I think one of the consequences of THAT was that I never really made it MINE ... never really got emotionally involved with it. NOW, forty years later, I tend to play simple but atmospheric pieces, including (gasp!) transcriptions, that DO engage both me AND the congregation, and which fit the "feel" of our services.   .. . . .   Find what you LIKE, and make THAT yours, and the music-making will come along.          
(back) Subject: Re: Making Music From: "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 12:03:23 -0500   > When a teacher says something like, "You're not making music," or, = "Half of what you play is only playing notes, and not music," what exactly is = meant by "making music?" > I'm not sure that I'd ever have wished to say it that way, but very likely such a comment seeks to move the student past the necessary, = careful, even slavish accuracy to the notes and into a more personal, "poetic" sort of interpretation of the music.   This implies that, to at least some degree, we put a personal stamp on the music, though it seems to me that we do also have an obligation to the composer to understand HOW he/she would have epxected the performer to = make such a personal interpretation. Putting a good-taste personal stamp on = any piece of music is vastly different from taking any license imaginable with it!   Few of us would have wished the architect of the U.S. Supreme Court bldg to "put a personal stamp" on it by drawing it as it is and then = adding gargoyles at the roof corners, flying buttresses on the sides and ends, Queen Anne type dormers in the roof, etc. We'd find that repugnant. = So likewise with music, if we can be informed about artistic music in the = same way we think we are informed about Greek classical architecture.   Or we would not wish a harpsichord and cello continuo at the bottom of = a rock song, even though that might be an interesting "personal stamp." = Most of us would find that out of place. So likewise, for example, playing Cesar Franck's three organ chorales in the manner of and with the freedom of Franz Liszt!! That strips Franck's music of the mystecism it ought to breathe to the listener. Curiously, of course, under the umbrella of = organ performer virtuoso display, some folks abide this very sort of distortion, even though the same folks would likely not abide a basso continuo with = rock songs or gothic additions to a Greek classical building.   All this being said, however, the architect of the Supreme Court building DID carry out certain personal ideas, much as each gothic = buidling has inviduality in it WITHIN THE OVERALL STYLE. Perhaps it's this sort = of individual or "poetic" performance that a teacher has in mind when he/she asks a student to "get beyond the notes and into the music," i.e., to = begin to play the music in more expressive manner.   I'll be endlessly grateful to the late, blessed Vernon deTar for = showing me and lots of others HOW TO DO THIS. In other words, he didn't make it seem as though I was a zombie because I did not produce what he thought = was "alive" music-making. He taught us HOW to achieve musically-expressive playing. That's hard!! And to a degree it depends on the student's ability to sense such things. There have been students with whom I have finally given up on this attempt, lest I frustrate them to the point where their playing got worse instead of better.   A teacher I once had -- and in thsi case, NOT Vernon deTar -- came to = my lesson in utter exasperation over his inability to "inspire" a student who had technqiue "to burn" but who could not "get beyond the notes and make music." We talked about that in terms of phrase structures, how to push = a phrase upwards and let it relax again, in terms of that student paying = more attention to how phrases group themselves into larger units and ultimately into the form of the work, and how it's important to have a "pecking = order" of phrase-endings, with very little relaxation at the close of individual phrases but more relaxation at the close of larger groups of phrases that somehow poetically or structurally belong together, and finally to set = off, say, the entire exposition section of a sonata form from the development section-- and THAT from the recapitulation section--or whatever the form seems to call for. But my follow student, for all his marvelous = technique, could not really "make music" to the degree of expressive beauty both our teacher and I wished for.   It's worth saying, by the way, that this student did go on to be a VERY successful parish musician, for which many other of the skills needed in such a role were very strong in his bag of skills. We don't all have complete strength in each area of our work, but if the average of our strengths and weakness is O.K, we'll do just fine.   One more step in this: when there is a musical/expressive/poetic *reason* to play the notes in just a very exacting, "musical" way, as opposed to simply trying to play them as accurately as a machine, THEN the student really has a reason to practice! At that point practice becomes = the necessary fortification for achieving good musicianship and not jsut the notes. Such practice also "moves beyond the notes" to the real = expressive purposes of the music, whatever its style.   This implies that from early on a teacher should try to help the = student discover a decent degree of personal, "internal" feeling about the music he/she is playing or singing and to bring that out in his performance. = All the while, that student must also learn the artistic factors of the given style of the moment, else the student go "off the deep end" into personal excesses of expression at the expense of the composer's expectations as = they existed in the composer's time.   This is a left-brain/right-brain discussion, and our attempt is to = keep the two factors, the rational/logical/intellectual and the artistic/expressive/emotional in correct proportion to the nature of the composer, era, etc., fo the music. One does not play Weber or Wagner with the same goals as Haydn or Mozart!!   Finally, for so many of us who might find it difficult to "get beyond the music," there are so so many others who do this easily but fail in their jobs because they don't maintain sufficient organizational or intrepersonal skills to have other people respond to them, all their "musicianly" playing to the contrary. Then the very music which they = would expect to "communicate" to others fails to do so because of other factors, organizational, intrapersona., etc., which that stand in the way. So = this issue of "getting beyond the music" is only one of numerous aspects that makes us successful organists. God grant that we may all be such in our own ways.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   A Curious P.S.: I've discussed keeping the aesthetic basis of a given = kind of creativity relatively correct and "pure," i.e., not adding gargolyles = to a Greek classical building. Yet, it's always inspiring to me to think = about how a great architect did in fact combine two somewhat different aesthetic manners into the U. S. capitol building.   The base of the buildling reflects the Greeks, the great humanists, while the dome reflects the ancient Romans, the great ancient lawyers. = So we have the Roman dome over the Greek classical base, the "LAWS over the MEN." Thus, these combined architecitural styles reflect a very basic understanding of American democracy, as opposed to having men over men, as was so often the case elsewhere in the ancient and modern world. If ever we learned this anew, we learned it in stark reality when all manner of state and national "leaders" discovered that they were not above the law. Some of them sat in the cooler for some years because of this, too!!   So I find the design of the U. S. capitol and many of the state = capitol buildings based on that design to convey a very stirring message. Other countries are also beginning to understand the genius of this message.    
(back) Subject: Re: Making Music From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 13:07:21 EST     --part1_179.12d6a556.2b2ccd59_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   There have been times in the service when I have forgotten the notes and = get caught up in the music, and play automatically (another word that can be flamed). But when this happens, it is a wonderful experience, both for me =   and the listeners (so I have been told). When I play to the Glory of God, = He takes over and makes the music. Lee   --part1_179.12d6a556.2b2ccd59_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">There have been times in the service when I have = forgotten the notes and get caught up in the music, and play automatically = (another word that can be flamed).&nbsp; But when this happens, it is a = wonderful experience, both for me and the listeners (so I have been = told).&nbsp; When I play to the Glory of God, He takes over and makes the = music.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_179.12d6a556.2b2ccd59_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Free Christmas music From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 10:49:22 -0800   Hello, folks....   4 or 5 years ago I wrote a short (and rather easy) 2 page Fughette on = Hark! the Herald Angels Sing to use as an easy postlude or carol introduction.   As my Christmas gift to you all this year I am offering to send it to = anyone who wants it as a PDF file attachment. Please respond privately to giwro@earthlink.net to keep the list unclogged <grin> if you are interested.   Merry Christmas!     Jonathan Orwig Pastor of Worship First Baptist Church of Riverside, CA USA     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.426 / Virus Database: 239 - Release Date: 12/2/02    
(back) Subject: Re: Free Christmas music From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 12:59:21 -0600   At 10:49 AM 12/14/02 -0800, you wrote: >giwro@earthlink.net Look forward to it,,,,   Jon C. Habermaas opus1100@catoe.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Making Music From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 16:36:16 EST     --part1_16e.188d64e6.2b2cfe50_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Morton:   It could be that both teachers were a bit inadequate in being able to express what they ment. Making music to me is convincing others of the freedom and abandon of the music where it takes on a life creating beauty and movement and rhythm. Convincing stop groupings to make the music sing, the ebb and flow, and musical shading. These to me are the things about music that go beyond the mechanics of playing the right notes and rhythms.   I like to hear musicians who take chances and play with complete abandon like Pearlmann, Zuckermann, Dupre, Felix Hell, Thomas Murray, and of course Issac Stern. These people become one with their instrument, the music and the air around them. I guess the best word is Charisma. They play enthusiastically as if on fire for the love of music. To do anything else comes across as prissy, but proper perfection of the notes and nothing more. In otherwords, no fire, no love, no warmth, no MUSIC! I'd rather hear brushing note mistakes done with fire and brilliance and love.   Ron Severin   --part1_16e.188d64e6.2b2cfe50_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Morton:<BR> <BR> It could be that both teachers were a bit inadequate in being able<BR> to express what they ment. Making music to me is convincing<BR> others of the freedom and abandon of the music where it takes<BR> on a life creating beauty and movement and rhythm. Convincing<BR> stop groupings to make the music sing, the ebb and flow, and<BR> musical shading. These to me are the things about music that<BR> go beyond the mechanics of playing the right notes and rhythms.<BR> <BR> I like to hear musicians who take chances and play with complete<BR> abandon like Pearlmann, Zuckermann, Dupre, Felix Hell, Thomas<BR> Murray, and of course Issac Stern. These people become one with<BR> their instrument, the music and the air around them. I guess the<BR> best word is Charisma. They play enthusiastically as if on fire for<BR> the love of music. To do anything else comes across as prissy,<BR> but proper perfection of the notes and nothing more. In otherwords,<BR> no fire, no love, no warmth, no MUSIC! I'd rather hear brushing note<BR> mistakes done with fire and brilliance and love.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_16e.188d64e6.2b2cfe50_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Free Christmas music From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2002 21:58:31 EST   In a message dated 12/14/02 1:54:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, giwro@earthlink.net writes:   << As my Christmas gift to you all this year I am offering to send it to anyone who wants it as a PDF file attachment. Please respond privately to giwro@earthlink.net to keep the list unclogged <grin> if you are interested. >>   I'd like a copy, if you don't mind if I arrange it for recorder ensemble = (if possible). If you would prefer that it only be performed on organ, I understand,   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD