PipeChat Digest #3310 - Thursday, December 19, 2002
 
Re: Grand Pianos
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
the Christmas menu
  by "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: Astin-Wight Pianos
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Voluntaries - definition
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Grand Pianos
  by <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Small 3 manual trackers
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Voluntaries - definition
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Christmas Preludes
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
SEC:Unclassified  Suspension from mailing list till end January 2	003
  by "Bothe, John MR" <John.Bothe@defence.gov.au>
re: voluntary- definition
  by "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Grand Pianos From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 22:08:14 -0600   A solid spruce soundboard is a standard for good pianos....cheap ones have ply construction. That's how some manufacturers can give a "lifetime" warranty on the soundboard...cause it's just a piece of plywood. It may be made from spruce, but it's still just ply wood.   A good soundboard is made with taper to it, in otherwords, not the same thickness all over. (just like a violin, viola, cello, bass are made). Ribs are added to the back side of the piano soundboard for strength and also to help transmit sound across the grain.   One of the prime reasons that new pianos don't sound like older ones, is that the spruce that's used today is "lower growth". That is coming from lower elevations, faster growing trees. Slow growing trees produce lumber that has more "annular rings" per inch than faster growing trees. This is a key issue to the quality of sound produced, and the strength of the soundboard as well.   Also, the grain needs to be straight as possible. Shake, twist and other flaws in the "shape" of the grain affect the sound of the soundboard...in bad ways.   It's always advisable to use humidifiers where pianos are used, if the air is dry. The National Piano Foundation used to suggest relative humidity of about 40% being ideal for a piano. That seems high, but I know I breath easier in the winter keeping it that high.   As far as cracks in "solid" soundboards. I've seen good pianos thrown away for that reason. Salesmen scaring people into believing the piano is no longer any good. Cracks are an easy fix, and unless they affect the tuning (because of locations of bridges), they are not to be concerned about. If the soundboard is bad enough that it has lost it's crown, then the tension should be let down, and the bottom shimmed and cracks repaired at that time.   Usually the soundboard is left for rebuilding when the piano is old enough to need the pin block replaced.   Yamahas sound the way they do, because of the engineering, not just because they have a "solid" sound board. And soundboards are not really solid, as the lumber is edgeglued to make a large area from boards usually no wider than 6".   just some thought from a technician....and I'm sure that there are other technicians that would disagree with some things I've said.     Jon Bertschinger Tonal Director Temple Organs Saint Joseph, MO (North Kansas City area)  
(back) Subject: the Christmas menu From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 22:06:41 -0600   Wow Bud, quite the list ! hope it all goes well.   I am looking forward to this Christmas Eve as I was not playing last year and really missed it. I started this new job last Sept. and am having a = lot of fun though it is a lot of work since I now have a church that = challenges me to reach new heights. This year will be my first lessons and carols service. Thought I would share the list with you all. There will be = trumpet descants on the opening and closing hymn which I was inspired to write for the occasion (too high for any choir!) and I will have the fun of = switching from organ to piano then to violin and then conduct the choir. Should be = an exciting night. Someday I hope to break into a higher level of postludes, but I program that which I can play well now. I have enjoyed the many = posts offering suggestions for fun postludes, I do keep a list.   All the best to you all ! Robert   A Festival of Lessons an d Carols for Christmas Eve - Heritage Congregational Church, Madison WI   PRELUDE (about 30 minutes)   Organ solos: At the Coming of Christmas Ancient French Noel Go Children, the Day is Passing Ancient French Noel Let Us All Go Into the Stable Ancient French Noel Of a Virgin He is Born Ancient French Noel Meditation on Silent Night Carl Schroeder Noel Angevin Cesar Franck   Vocal solo: Gesu Bambino Pietro Yon (w/piano and flute) Violin solo: O Holy Night Adolphe Adam (w/piano) Anthem: Before the Marvel of This Night Carl Schalk Processional Hymn: O Come, All Ye Faithful Bidding Prayer and Lord's Prayer The Lighting of the Christ Candle Children's Sermon Blessing Lesson 1 Genesis 3:8-15 Anthem: Adam Lay Ybounden Robert Powell Lesson 2 Isaiah 9:2, 6-7 Carol What Child Is This? (w/flute descant) Lesson 3 Isaiah 11:1-9 Trumpet Solo: Con Spirito (from Heroic Music) G.P. Telemann Lesson 4 Luke 1:26-35, 38 Anthem: Gabriel to Mary Came arr. D.Wilcocks Lesson 5 Luke 2:1-7 Anthem: Still, Still, Still Austrian Carol Lesson 6 Luke 2:8-16 Carol Angels We Have Heard On High Lesson 7 John 1:1-14 Organ solo: Noel (recit de flute) J. Charpentier Sermon Carol Silent Night (violin, flute and guitar only) The Passing of the Light The Collect and the Christmas Blessing Recessional Hymn Joy to the World Postlude: Gigue Fugue D. Buxtehude      
(back) Subject: Re: Astin-Wight Pianos From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 23:50:23 EST     --part1_88.2165f947.2b32aa0f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi........   As one that lives in Salt Lake City, home of the Astin -Weight piano, all = I can say is that they have some strange ideas as to how to make a piano at that company, very strange indeed.   Bill Hesterman   --part1_88.2165f947.2b32aa0f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi........<BR> <BR> As one that lives in Salt Lake City, home of the Astin -Weight piano, all = I can say is that they have some strange ideas as to how to make a piano = at that company, very strange indeed.<BR> <BR> Bill Hesterman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_88.2165f947.2b32aa0f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Voluntaries - definition From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 00:29:34 EST     --part1_15e.18cdc797.2b32b33e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   I hate to throw this in with all the excitement of Christmas, but I'd appreciate an answer if somebody has the time....   What is a "Voluntary"? Growing up, and just getting into the organ, I had =   always heard Clarke's "Trumpet Voluntary". I assumed that a voluntary was =   much like that in sound and structure - solo A - echo A - solo B - echo B = - solo A - echo A.   I have a few books entitled "English Organ Music for Manuals". There are several pieces contained therein that are called "voluntaries", but they sound nothing like what got imprinted in my mind.   I've been reading some info by the late Julian Rhodes about small organs. = He mentions certain settings being appropriate for "voluntary playing" (from = the context, it's apparent that he's talking about playing voluntaries, not voluntarily playing, LOL).   So, my quick question is - please tell me what a voluntary is, and what = kinds of registrations are considered traditional for voluntary playing.   Thanks, Keith Zimmerman   --part1_15e.18cdc797.2b32b33e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> I hate to throw this in with all the excitement of Christmas, but I'd = appreciate an answer if somebody has the time....<BR> <BR> What is a "Voluntary"?&nbsp; Growing up, and just getting into the organ, = I had always heard Clarke's "Trumpet Voluntary".&nbsp; I assumed that a = voluntary was much like that in sound and structure - solo A - echo A - = solo B - echo B - solo A - echo A.<BR> <BR> I have a few books entitled "English Organ Music for Manuals".&nbsp; There = are several pieces contained therein that are called "voluntaries", but = they sound nothing like what got imprinted in my mind.<BR> <BR> I've been reading some info by the late Julian Rhodes about small = organs.&nbsp; He mentions certain settings being appropriate for = "voluntary playing" (from the context, it's apparent that he's talking = about playing voluntaries, not voluntarily playing, LOL).<BR> <BR> So, my quick question is - please tell me what a voluntary is, and what = kinds of registrations are considered traditional for voluntary = playing.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith Zimmerman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_15e.18cdc797.2b32b33e_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Grand Pianos From: <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 00:37:12 -0500   On Wed, Dec 18, 2002 at 10:08:14PM -0600, jon bertschinger wrote: > A solid spruce soundboard is a standard for good pianos....cheap > ones have ply construction. That's how some manufacturers can > give a "lifetime" warranty on the soundboard...cause it's just a > piece of plywood. It may be made from spruce, but it's still > just ply wood. >   Good points, all. There's more black magic in pianos than there is even in organs . . think about it, most pianos are sold to consumers who are neither musicians, woodworkers, metalworkers, piano techs . . . .   If you poke around on rec.music.makers.piano, there's at least on Steinway sales wonk who's quick to beat down any heresy such as Yamaha making a "real" piano, while extoling their "Handmade" pianos.   I don't consider a steam press that happens to use an eight man crew instead of hydraulics to be "old world craftsmanship" so much as "19th Century Unsafe Sweatshop Mass Production"   Anyone who's hand drilling pin blocks should meet my friend, Mr. CNC, who can do it faster and more accuratly.   Not to bash the brand by any means. I've played some truly delightful Steinways, frankly bordering on orgasmic. But I've come to dread arrving at a new church who "Has a Steinway . . " a hundred year old instument that apparantly was in a flood at least once, but gosh darnit, it's a Steinway so it MUST be the greatest piano ever . . ."   My experience has been that pianos are much like HVAC systems. The most important part of the thing is the guy who installs and maintains it. Any top flight maker's nominal 9-footer CAN be amazing.   But only if the guy tuning and regulating is on top of things.   Best thing to find in a church is an institutional black Yamaha upright. Ugly, but manage to stay in tune under hard use. I've always imagined they were reincarnated Greek seige engines.   Worst is the aforementioned U-boat grand, any maker, followed by the usual Samick manufactured clones (Baldwin etc) uprights.   Every church I've served, and the church I attend now, has had a dreadful Samick/Baldwin in the sanctuary. . . .     Charles      
(back) Subject: Small 3 manual trackers From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 00:45:38 EST     --part1_a5.3246cc9c.2b32b702_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   Still dreaming into the future, but here goes.....   In tracker organs, it always seems that the divisions are built upon a central axis, often flanked by the C and C# sides of the pedal.   The manual divisions might be at the same level with one in front of the other, elevated on 2 or more levels, or some combination.   Do you find tracker action organs with manual divisions to the side? I realize that that will require more tracker mechanism - either rollers or right angles (squares). In a house that I hope to build some day, I hope = to have a loft in which to place the organ so that it will speak down into = the room. Electric action will give me the most versatility, but I would = really like to build a tracker. I was very impressed with an article by the late =   Julian Rhodes about small three manual organs (see: http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm).   In this 2 story room, I will have 2 main options for tracker organs: 1. put the organ in the living room. May have Swell in front with Great exposed above it and small Choir behind Great. 2. put the organ in the loft or balcony seen from the living room. I = would only have 9-10' of ceiling height in the loft. There would be a great = niche for a 2 manual organ (Swell behind Great), but i'd like three smaller divisions. How is that usually done.   I had envisioned having the Swell and Choir arranged side by side on chromatic chests having their treble ends meeting at the center. The = keydesk would be centrally located as well. The Great would be exposed and would = be centrally located behind the Swell and Choir - and would speak from = between them - in the wide "V".   If the console were located several feet from the front of the organ case, = I can see how it would be fairly easy to run the action thru the floor = having the trackers fan out or utilize roller bars to get to the S and C.   Anyway, I would appreciate any suggestions for laying out a small 3 manual =   tracker. Please visit the site mentioned above if you need to know what = I'm considering.   Thanks, Keith   --part1_a5.3246cc9c.2b32b702_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> Still dreaming into the future, but here goes.....<BR> <BR> In tracker organs, it always seems that the divisions are built upon a = central axis, often flanked by the C and C# sides of the pedal.<BR> <BR> The manual divisions might be at the same level with one in front of the = other, elevated on 2 or more levels, or some combination.<BR> <BR> Do you find tracker action organs with manual divisions to the side?&nbsp; = I realize that that will require more tracker mechanism - either rollers = or right angles (squares).&nbsp; In a house that I hope to build some day, = I hope to have a loft in which to place the organ so that it will speak = down into the room.&nbsp; Electric action will give me the most = versatility, but I would really like to build a tracker.&nbsp; I was very = impressed with an article by the late Julian Rhodes about small three = manual organs&nbsp; (see:&nbsp; = http://www.ondamar.demon.co.uk/schemes/trz/3m.htm).<BR> <BR> In this 2 story room, I will have 2 main options for tracker organs:<BR> 1.&nbsp; put the organ in the living room.&nbsp; May have Swell in front = with Great exposed above it and small Choir behind Great.<BR> 2.&nbsp; put the organ in the loft or balcony seen from the living = room.&nbsp; I would only have 9-10' of ceiling height in the loft.&nbsp; = There would be a great niche for a 2 manual organ (Swell behind Great), = but i'd like three smaller divisions.&nbsp; How is that usually done.<BR> <BR> I had envisioned having the Swell and Choir arranged side by side on = chromatic chests having their treble ends meeting at the center.&nbsp; The = keydesk would be centrally located as well.&nbsp; The Great would be exposed and would be centrally = located behind the Swell and Choir - and would speak from between them - = in the wide "V".<BR> <BR> If the console were located several feet from the front of the organ case, = I can see how it would be fairly easy to run the action thru the floor = having the trackers fan out or utilize roller bars to get to the S and = C.<BR> <BR> Anyway, I would appreciate any suggestions for laying out a small 3 manual = tracker.&nbsp; Please visit the site mentioned above if you need to know = what I'm considering.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a5.3246cc9c.2b32b702_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Voluntaries - definition From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 00:01:52 -0600       Keith wrote:   > What is a "Voluntary"? Growing up, and just getting into the organ, I > had always heard Clarke's "Trumpet Voluntary". I assumed that a > voluntary was much like that in sound and structure - solo A - echo A > - solo B - echo B - solo A - echo A.   I understand that the word "voluntary" came from one of the English organists, Croft or Boyce or Stanley, or some such, whose contract stipulated that he was to provide music during the service. The music for the prelude and postlude that he provided was not stipulated in the contract, and thus, was not compensated for, hence was "voluntary".   I remember reading this, but apparently not in the source in which I thought I did, because when I went to verify the answer, I don't find it there.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Preludes From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 01:08:13 EST     --part1_18.2a07a81b.2b32bc4d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/18/2002 10:04:08 PM Central Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   > If you have Finale, I could send it to you as a file. By the way, I = could > also send you my setting of my poem on the wise men to Dites-nous Marie. = I > didn't fully write out the accompaniment, but the SATB parts are there.   I have Finale 2001a.   Dale G. Rider, MSM, CAGO Organist/Director of Music Ministries First Baptist Church /American Kansas City, Missouri Volunteer Staff Organist Community of Christ Auditorium & Temple Independence, Missouri   --part1_18.2a07a81b.2b32bc4d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 12/18/2002 10:04:08 = PM Central Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">If you have = <B>Finale</B>, I could send it to you as a file. By the way, I could also = send you my setting of my poem on the wise men to Dites-nous Marie.&nbsp; = I didn't fully write out the accompaniment, but the SATB parts are there. = </BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0"><B><BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb= sp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;= &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb= sp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I have Finale = 2001a.<BR> </B><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0">Dale G. Rider, = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D1 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0"><I>MSM, = CAGO<BR> Organist/Director of Music Ministries</I><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SERIF" FACE=3D"Book Antiqua" LANG=3D"0"><B>First = Baptist Church</B> /American<BR> Kansas City, Missouri<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <I>Volunteer Staff = Organist</I><BR> <B><I>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </I>Community of = Christ</B> Auditorium &amp; Temple<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Independence, = Missouri<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_18.2a07a81b.2b32bc4d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: SEC:Unclassified Suspension from mailing list till end January 2 003 From: "Bothe, John MR" <John.Bothe@defence.gov.au> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 15:07:40 +1100   Hello List, Please suspend my email address from list till I return from leave at end January 2003; my mail box would not be able to handle the = mail.   Happy Christmas to all   John BOthe Melbourne, AUSTRALIA  
(back) Subject: re: voluntary- definition From: "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2002 07:15:45 -0200   Hi, Keith   I sought in the Internet and I found this very interessant article. I hope, it help you.   Regards, Domitila Ballesteros   http://www.canticanova.com/articles/misc/art7c1.htm   --- UOL, o melhor da Internet http://www.uol.com.br/