PipeChat Digest #2683 - Sunday, February 3, 2002
 
French organs and churches and places and stuff
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
CONTACT INFO FOR CHRISTOPHER PARDINI
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Is Carol Williams a Theatre organist?
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Excuse me . . .
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: CONTACT INFO FOR CHRISTOPHER PARDINI
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Jonathan Hall - Serenity in Hartford
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
DETROIT FOX CONSOLE
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: French organs and churches and places and stuff From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 08:29:39 -0600   This is a question to Agnes and other aficionados (forgive me if the spelling is wrong - it is Saturday, when my mind does not work in more than three syllables) of Parisian churches and organs. How would a neophyte to Paris and France, like me, choose which church in the area to attend on Sunday? I mean, there are so many in the general area with impressive organs and history and services.   It would be nice if some of you in the know give a brief run-down on what to expect on a typical Sunday in each (recitals before and/or after service, choir, condition of organ, where to sit for the best blend, how to meet the organist and see the organ, the service itself - because I am a liturgical nut, stuff like that), and which you consider the "best" services overall, giving your reasons. And please include other French places, because I have no idea how far away Chartres or Rouen (an Americanized spelling to be sure) are.   There is your homework assignment, if you choose to accept it.   Regards,   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 13:23:40 -0500       Rodney West wrote:   (SNIP) I admit to going to concerts earlier and feeling critical--ah, the stupidity of youth. Nowadays, I love hearing people do things differently. I embrace the freshness. I don't go into concerts wanting to criticize the organ or player. I go in to be touched and enlightened.   Mike blathers:   As a newbee orgophile I am amazed when someone tells me to wear earplugs when hearing a Fisk, or not to waste my time hearing such and such and organist, or to throw my Herbert Howells music in the fire, or to avoid all of an organ builder's instruments whether they are deemed successful or not. If I don't give myself the chance to (hear-see-play-experience) the good with the bad, how will I ever know which is which? Education is not just learning about success. There is much to be gleaned from historical failure as well. It's like the organ teachers who forbid their students from ever touching the crescendo pedal. What's with that?   Mike (who happens to love the Fisk at Oberlin and without earplugs too!!!)    
(back) Subject: CONTACT INFO FOR CHRISTOPHER PARDINI From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 17:25:30 EST   Does anyone have this information? Your help will be greatly appreciated. =   Thanks so much.   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Is Carol Williams a Theatre organist? From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 17:57:13 -0500   At 01:37 AM 02/02/2002 -0800, Rodney West wrote: >Is she really a theater organist? I didn't know. I don't know either. I have three of her CD's. Based on this sample I would characterize her playing as too loud and too fast. Just my opinion, =   others may think differently.   HD    
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 16:18:01 -0800 (PST)     --- Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote: > Mike blathers: > > As a newbee orgophile I am amazed when someone > tells me to wear > earplugs when hearing a Fisk, or not to waste my > time hearing such and > such and organist, or to throw my Herbert Howells > music in the fire, or to > avoid all of an organ builder's instruments whether > they are deemed > successful or not.   You are absolutely right to be open to everything, Mike. Whoever gave you the above-written advice is missing out on a whole lot in life and art. It's a pity. Do your own thing and enjoy the wide spectrum offered in every artistic medium. It is all there to be tasted, and that is what makes life grand and interesting.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Great stuff seeking new owners in Yahoo! Auctions! http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "STEVE BOURNIAS" <yfd4@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 00:29:32 +0000   I am of the opinion and belief that EVERY organ, organist, organ-builder, hobbiest etc has something GOOD to offer to the rest. Every organ can be made to sound beautiful in at least some way and every organist has some musical expression worthy of consideration and every organ-builder has = done something worth exploring...Steve Bournias in Warren,Ohio     >From: Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS >Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 13:23:40 -0500 > > > >Rodney West wrote: > > (SNIP) I admit to going to concerts earlier and feeling >critical--ah, the stupidity of youth. Nowadays, I >love hearing people do things differently. I embrace >the freshness. I don't go into concerts wanting to >criticize the organ or player. I go in to be touched >and enlightened. > >Mike blathers: > > As a newbee orgophile I am amazed when someone tells me to wear >earplugs when hearing a Fisk, or not to waste my time hearing such and >such and organist, or to throw my Herbert Howells music in the fire, or = to >avoid all of an organ builder's instruments whether they are deemed >successful or not. If I don't give myself the chance to >(hear-see-play-experience) the good with the bad, how will I ever know >which is which? Education is not just learning about success. There is >much to be gleaned from historical failure as well. It's like the organ >teachers who forbid their students from ever touching the crescendo = pedal. >What's with that? > > Mike (who happens to love the Fisk at Oberlin and without earplugs >too!!!) > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     opin   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.    
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 20:31:19 -0500       Rodney West wrote: > > --- Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote: > > Mike said: > > > > As a newbee orgophile I am amazed when someone > > tells me to wear > > earplugs when hearing a Fisk, or not to waste my > > time hearing such and..   <snip>   When I attended OHS Boston 2000, I heard some other attendees berating an instrument and an organist at a recital. I commented to them that = attending 30+ recitals means that you will not find every pipe organ your = 'favorite'. That's what conventions do - you get a representation of what each of = these musical instruments IS.   As Foxnews says, "YOU decide."   Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Excuse me . . . From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 19:39:01 -0600   But I just tried Peter Storandt's e-mail address (which was good a week ago), and it came back undeliverable, so I'm worried. Peter, are you out there? If so, please reply privately.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: CONTACT INFO FOR CHRISTOPHER PARDINI From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 17:58:41 -0800 (PST)   Contact Mr. Pardini at the Crystal Cathedral, Garden Grove, California.. He is the organist there.   --- ScottFop@aol.com wrote: > Does anyone have this information? Your help will > be greatly appreciated. > > Thanks so much. > > Scott Foppiano > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Great stuff seeking new owners in Yahoo! Auctions! http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 21:05:18 EST     --part1_151.8483801.298df4de_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/2/02 4:51:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, rodneywest72@yahoo.com writes:     > he misses the > whole point of a concert. to be deeply moved and > changed by the music. The organ isn't the music, > persay, but is the vehicle through which the musician > expresses his musicality. Who cares what action the > instrument has if the music touches and inspires us. > That's the whole point. >   Actually, I go to organ concerts to hear the organ. I'm not as concerned with what, who, or how the organ is played as long as it's well = demonstrated and the performance at least includes most of the notes in the right = order. For me, the point of going to a recital is to hear a pipe organ. If the music touches and inspires me, it's a bonus. I just love hearing pipes tooting!   Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 >   --part1_151.8483801.298df4de_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 2/2/02 4:51:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, rodneywest72@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">he misses the <BR>whole point of a concert. to be deeply moved and <BR>changed by the music. &nbsp;The organ isn't the music, <BR>persay, but is the vehicle through which the musician <BR>expresses his musicality. &nbsp;Who cares what action the <BR>instrument has if the music touches and inspires us. <BR>That's the whole point. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Actually, I go to organ concerts to hear the organ. &nbsp;I'm not as = concerned with what, who, or how the organ is played as long as it's well = demonstrated and the performance at least includes most of the notes in = the right order. &nbsp;&nbsp;For me, the point of going to a recital is to = hear a pipe organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;If the music touches and inspires me, it's = a bonus. &nbsp;&nbsp;I just love hearing pipes tooting! <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt; &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_151.8483801.298df4de_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Jonathan Hall - Serenity in Hartford From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 22:46:05 -0500   St. Joseph Cathedral, Hartford, Connecticut   Saturday, February 2, 2002, 3:15 p.m. A recital by listmember Dr. Jonathan Hall, Organist and Choirmaster of The Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, New York City.   St. Joseph has a regular Saturday recital series at a time that seems a = bit odd until one realizes that the recital precedes a later Saturday evening vigil Mass. The music becomes a long prelude as people file in for Mass, joining those who are there expressly to hear the music. This idea can be = a disaster, as is always the case at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan. = The first piece on your 4:45 program there becomes an accompaniment to = hundreds of people leaving the 4 p.m. Mass. Your last piece becomes a prelude for = the hordes arriving for the 5:30 Mass. That Organ should be heard, and I = suppose this is one way of making that possible, but only the middle parts of any concert are able to be enjoyed. In Hartford, not many were coming in for Mass, and I am afraid not many were there for the recital either, perhaps = at most twenty. (There appears to be no publicity. Certainly, no one there is taking advantage of the opportunity to get out the word through the free listings in The American Organist Magazine.) However, those coming in for the Mass were generally respectful and quiet. The usual hardware of a = large Roman Catholic church, the heavy kneelers, occasionally made themselves known, but for the most part, it was possible to listen to our Jonathan carefully and with pleasure. A good thing this, in that he chose a very serene program, not one to please those looking for the blaze of = horizontal reeds and all of that, but one filled with beauty - lovely sounds, lovely playing. The Program:   Jean Langlais - <Ave Maria, Ave Maris Stella> This lovely piece is the one = I don't play from the Three Gregorian Paraphrases. That now has to change! = It is a gorgeous piece, and one to show off the fine strings, flutes, & solo reeds of this large Austin Organ.   Arthur C. Becker (1895-1976) - <Ave Regina Coelorum>. A very compact, = single movement piece with the plainsong on a lovely Oboe with strings - Very = short and very sweet.   From the Dupre Magnificat Antiphons, opus 18 No. 13: He hath put down the mighty from their seat . . . Cantilena. = Oboe (?) accompanied by strings. No. 14: He remembering his mercy . . . <Misterioso e Adagiosissimo>. An ever-so-slow single page, steely strings without tremulant or Celestes, = with slow plodding notes on the 16 Subbass and the 32' No. 15: Gloria - Finale. The Toccata movement at the end of the volume. Cleanly played with registrational restraint. The registration was rich = and full, but not over much.   Johannes Brahms - Chorale Prelude, Opus 122, No. 8. <Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen> - more loveliness, played perhaps a shade perfunctorily.   Buxtehude - Magnificat Primi Toni. I think someone was extolling the = virtues of this splendid work on one of the organ lists in the last few days. = Again, played with clarity and restraint. Jonathan began to let it out before the little "gigue" section, for a grand climactic ending. Like many organs = with lots of exposed pipework in not fabulously resonant rooms, this instrument tends not to get out into the very long and high room. Jonathan said that = he had more-or-less everything on at the end, and given the structured build = up of sound as the recital progressed, the finish had great dramatic power, which is different from a huge volume of shattering sound. That we did not have.   So, thank you Jonathan for a program of great loveliness, well chosen, = well registered, and beautifully played. For those in the New York area, = Jonathan can be heard next Tuesday, February 5th, on the Appleton at the = Metropolitan Museum. The note in today's program does not give the time, but I suspect Jonathan will post that information.   This little review is jumping the queue, but I thought I could best do it now while it is fresh in my mind. I heard listmember Paul Emmons at West Chester University in Pennsylvania on E. M. Skinner Opus 596 last Monday, and will hope to work up a true panegyric to him from my extensive notes = in the next couple of days. I am simultaneously struggling with the last few OHS convention reports, and then there is a list of about six other = earlier recitals I have attended that I am really frustrated about not having = shared with you all yet. On top of that, I have a life!   Cheers to you all!   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com          
(back) Subject: DETROIT FOX CONSOLE From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 23:55:33 EST   PROLOGUE: To my friend Greg Bellamy at the Fox down on Woodward Avenue. These memories bring back some very good times of years past. Had it not been for your trust in my judgment and abilities I would not have these memories. Keep up the excellent work at the theatre! * * * * *   As I was sitting here tonight working on the song list for an upcoming concert (Plummer Auditorium, Fullerton, CA on April 21) I wanted to listen = to some theatre organ music. I pulled Simon Gledhill's "The Fox Album" = which, I must admit, is a CD I haven't listened to in quite some time. As Simon's playing is always top notch I knew I would enjoy not only that, but also hearing again the sounds of the Mighty Wurlitzer I know so well having = been a house organist at the Fox on and off over the period of nine years.   As the music played on, something prompted me to look in the liner notes = for a composer or show name or something like that. As I opened the jewel box =   and took out the insert material I stopped and focused on the back cover = shot of the console. I was immediately and most vividly taken back to 1992. = Why? Because the Fox console looked like it did in the photo (at the time) because of my own efforts that I donated to the theatre with the blessing = of my friend and Fox Operations Manager Greg Bellamy.   I remember well over the course of two evenings and one afternoon working = on the console in anticipation of the 1992 Summer Movie Series. This would probably have been late May or early June. The combination action had = just been revived since the previous summer and all of the organists who were allowed to play "the big organ" publicly were very excited by the fact = that we no longer had to hand register the 200+ stop tabs by hand.   As our volunteer work crew, led by Roger Mumbrue, worked every Monday = night on releathering pneumatics and working on other various parts of the = organ, the house and stage manager at that time, Randy Mauck, had added more spotlights than the previous year to illuminate the massive console from = the light cove in the dome in the auditorium's ceiling, the colonnades on = either side of the house and even in the side walls of the proscenium (to = illuminate the laurel-wreath-encrusted Fox logo on the sides of the console). I remember vividly hearing Greg tell him, verbatim, as he was directing = spots on one of our work nights: "When that console rises up out of the pit it should light up like Annie Lennox!" In light of this I asked Greg if I = could clean up the console's appearance before the first week of the summer = movie runs. He asked what I would do and I basically said "touch up the gold leafing and clean it up so it looks more stunning than it already does." = It did look beautiful, though a bit faded and tired from dust and dirt. The gold leafed decorative work, though beautiful, was dark and worn and did = not really show up brilliantly as it should. (Remember- the organ had only = been put back on its lift two years earlier during the restoration of the theatre.)   As each movie palace had its own unique decor, so did the organ consoles. =   The instruments would arrive at their new homes in the 20's with plain = wood consoles, unless specially decorated as part of the contractual agreement between the organ builder and theatre management. In Wurlitzer's case, = most were sent with bare wood and were decorated on sight to match the interior = of the great auditoriums. The story goes that the Detroit Fox console still = had totally bare wood on its stop bolsters up until the 60's. As the Fox had just been restored and reopened two years earlier, and as the organ would play a prominent part in the entertainment of patrons for the summer movie =   series, it had to look as good as it could. So, after my inquiry, Greg = gave me the green light to go ahead and pretty-up the console.   The first chore was to replace the broken glass in the music rack. A = glass and mirror company in a Detroit suburb called Birmingham took care of this for me and cut two new pieces of glass to fit the back and lower ledge of = the music rack. Next was the actual console finish and ormolu itself. The entire console shell had been spraypainted (in an auto shop), I believe, = in the 1960's by Henry Przybylski, who maintained the organ at the time. The =   color is, as I have been told, "Burial Vault Bronze." Though it may sound = a bit out of the ordinary, it looks very fine in that room when illuminated = and gives off a very warm sheen.   Now for the difficult part. As I had no knowledge of gold leafing and our =   volunteer efforts were on a budget, so to speak, I did the next best = thing. I went to an arts supply store and got wood and art cleaning solution, = gold leaf paint and appropriate brushes. Back in those days in the early 90's, =   before little Caesar's took over the offices in the front of the theatre, = the organists could practically come and go 24/7 to practice and play the = grand organ. As we played the lobby organ regularly through the year for overtures, all of the security guards knew us. I would go down there = about 1 am on those nights when nothing was going on and work on the console. = After cleaning the dust and grime off I then took out the tiny paintbrushes and basically played Picasso. It was so interesting to learn my way around = all of the intricate plaster decoration. I actually had fun doing it. In addition to the top piece bearing the majority of the decorative work, = there is also the horseshoe that surrounds the top row of stop tabs, the key = desk that goes outward to either side from the Accompaniment manual (where the four manuals sit) and the bottom "posts" (for lack of a better term) that seem to hold up the top section of the console. Prior to this work these bottom posts were brown and I noticed the most beautiful leafy = configuration on either side. I knew that they would really show up when illuminated so = I paid special attention to them.   When it was all said and done I did two complete applications. It was looking better. As I left I put the ghost light back on the stage, I had = put three fans surrounding the console to assist drying the gold, as I knew I would be back the next morning eager to see my work. I remember looking toward the pit from the back of a darkened house with just the ghost light =   behind the raised console, the silhouette of the huge organ was really = cool to see in that setting. I was lucky to have seen that sight many many = times through the years with my friend Frank Vanaman from Baltimore who visited regularly and would accompany me to our "middle of the night jam = sessions." (Remember that Frank?)   I arrived the next morning very excited to see how the now dried gold = decor would look. The work lights were on, but not the house lights. Still- = they provided a hint of what I had hoped for: There in the center of the pit = sat a console which looked practically brand new and had more definition than = I had ever seen it have before. Upon turning the house lights up it became more apparent that my concept was a good one. The old Wurlitzer console = took on a newly revived appearance and looked clean and splendid. But as I = stood there, I remember saying "it needs something else." I had remembered = seeing photos of the St. Louis Ambassador console, which had been done in silver leaf. I had an idea, and went and got silver leaf paint and added it to = the crests of the plaster work, like at the crest of the wave where the two = lower sides come up together and make a "ridge." THAT WAS IT! When that had = dried I sat there on the front row and just stared at it for probably a half = hour without moving. It looked so beautiful and CORRECT!   Greg walked in and from the back of the vast house verbally gave his = approval (in his own inimitable manner with a slight smile on his face). As he = walked down the long aisle and approached the orchestra pit he seemed pleased. I =   must say- it truly glowed, it absolutely GLOWED. It was quite magical and I almost felt a reverence gazing at the beauty of this behemoth instrument.   How did I get onto all of this? Seeing the insert of Simon's CD. I don't =   know what the shape of the console is these days, as some stage hand once again brought the orchestra lift down on the console two years later, splitting the top piece into several pieces and ruining most of the = plaster work. One can see this in the CD's photograph of Simon sitting at the console, which was lowered into the pit for the photo. In the extreme = upper left corner one can discern where a piece of the plaster was basically scraped off, leaving only bare wood where gold leaf decor once was.   I thank those of you who read this far as I just wanted to share my good memories of a very happy time. Those Fox memories will be with me for the =   rest of my life.   * * * * *   EPILOGUE: Greg, thanks for the years of being able to make music there. = I hope to be able to play that organ again someday.   Scott Foppiano