PipeChat Digest #2684 - Sunday, February 3, 2002
 
Thanks and a Correction
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
Question..
  by "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Is Carol Williams a Theatre organist?
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
SORTA OFF-TOPIC: Gradual Psalms, Year B (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
From Alexander Frey:re. Critique etc.
  by <AFberlin2@aol.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Epiphany 4A and some good news
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
 

(back) Subject: Thanks and a Correction From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 09:21:08 -0500 (EST)     Dear Malcolm, and List---   What a beautiful review! Thank you, Malcolm. I always wanted to start a recital pianissimo, on high c-sharp, on the Swell celeste......   The date of the NYC program at the Met is Wednesday, Feb. 6, not the 5th as the Hartford program stated...I don't know who goofed on that, quite possibly it was I...the recital in NYC starts at 3:30, again, on Wednesday...   All best,   Jonathan    
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 07:05:42 -0800 (PST)   --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > Actually, I go to organ concerts to hear the organ. > I'm not as concerned > with what, who, or how the organ is played as long > as it's well demonstrated > and the performance at least includes most of the > notes in the right order. > For me, the point of going to a recital is to hear a > pipe organ. If the > music touches and inspires me, it's a bonus. I > just love hearing pipes > tooting!   Gillian Weir once said that she absolutely hates it when someone comes up to her following one of her recitals and says, "You demonstrated the organ beautifully!" She feels they missed the whole point of her concert and work. She finds it insulting to her own intelligence. I think any true, thinking and feeling artist would agree.   Music is the Art and the artist is the vehicle through which it is communicated. The instrument is the medium.   A great artist can make a mediocre organ sound very good--Virgil Fox did that all the time! A mediocre artist can make a fine instrument sometimes sound not as good as as it really is.   If all one is interested in is only the instrument, why bother even going to concerts? Should one simply arrange time to sit down at the organ, press down keys and hear "pipes tooting"?   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Great stuff seeking new owners in Yahoo! Auctions! http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Question.. From: "Rodney West" <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 07:11:24 -0800 (PST)   Does anybody know anything more about the proposed San Francisco outdoor organ project?   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Great stuff seeking new owners in Yahoo! Auctions! http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 10:50:01 -0500       Rodney West wrote:   > > > Gillian Weir once said that she absolutely hates it > when someone comes up to her following one of her > recitals and says, "You demonstrated the organ > beautifully!" She feels they missed the whole point > of her concert and work. She finds it insulting to > her own intelligence. I think any true, thinking and > feeling artist would agree.   <<I would not portend to diminish the artistry of Gillian Weir, but I think this aptly demonstrates the arrogance of an organist. People attend a pipe organ recital with a rather different agenda than say an Orchestra concert. Few would care if the violins are all Strads, or the trumpets all Schilkes, or the piano a Steinway. Organ recitals are quite different where the organist must share billing with the instrument, which is a work of art in itself. I have always advocated that tonal finisher of the organ is equally responsible for the artistry of the performance, but is seldom if ever recognized when the applause begins. >>   > Music is the Art and the artist is the vehicle through > which it is communicated. The instrument is the > medium.   <<The organ is JUST?? the medium. Tell that to Ken List or Joe Nichols, or Wayne Simpson or Richard Schneider or Keith Morgan, or....>>   > A great artist can make a mediocre organ sound very > good--Virgil Fox did that all the time! A mediocre > artist can make a fine instrument sometimes sound not > as good as as it really is.   <<That will always work both ways when you are speaking of an organ recital where organists and organs of varying degrees of quality come together>>   > If all one is interested in is only the instrument, > why bother even going to concerts? Should one simply > arrange time to sit down at the organ, press down keys > and hear "pipes tooting"?   <<You should be in my shoes and try and sit down at an organ to "toot" the pipes. Unless you are in possession of credentials, you will more likely be chased away with a broom. All that us neophytes have are organ recitals. Yes the music is beautiful and I love it, but the organ is far higher on the priority list for me than the organist. I would expect the organist to be qualified to give a recital and properly prepared to do it well. If they do it brilliantly, then that's a bonus. If not, I have still experienced the art of the instrument.>>   Respectfully Submitted Mike Gettelman   > > > __________________________________________________    
(back) Subject: Re: Is Carol Williams a Theatre organist? From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 11:27:36 -0500       Hugh Drogemuller wrote:     Greetings Hugh,   I heard her play the 4/18 WurliTzer at Babson a few years ago and she did = a good job. She seems to be a bit more formal than most TO only performers = and the program tends to be more semi classical than popular.   Cheers,   Mack    
(back) Subject: SORTA OFF-TOPIC: Gradual Psalms, Year B (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 06:46:11 -0800   I have started setting the Gradual Psalms and Alleluias for Year B (begins next Advent Sunday) in modern language with SATB fauxbourdons and organ accompaniment.If you'd like to receive them as I write them, and you're not presently on my music download list, please e-mail me privately and indicate whether you want them in Sibelius or Adobe PDFs.   They're free ... donations to St. Matthew's Pipe Organ Fund cheerfully accepted (grin).   I'll go back and pick up the end of Year A (Sept.-Nov.) as soon as I receive the book ... it's ordered.   The texts are according to the Episcopal usage, but I think they're very similar to the RC lectionary.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 07:51:06 +1300   I'm reminded, in this discussion of listening to the organ as against listening to the music, of a remark made by Sir Thomas Beecham many years ago. "English people hate music, but they simply love the sound it makes." This is often true with organists. Don't ask whether the organ can do its job well - like accompanying singing in a church - but instead ask if it = has a big Tuba, or what the composition of the Mixture is, or whether the strings have stopped basses, or what the action is, or whether it conforms to the latest theory of historic copy-Baroque Revival-Romantic-modern classic-youname it. The problem is, if it is a problem, that very often these days those who support the keeping of an organ at all in the church are those who are not musicians but merely like the "traditional sound" of an organ, making the place "feel" like a church. It was probably always like this - probably = few sensitive musicians who adore music have had the ability, or whatever it = is that it takes, to make lots of money to give away. OK, OK, I'm probably ruffling feathers here, and exaggerating as well, but is there anything in what I'm saying? I do know for sure in my part of the world that in many organists' associations probably half the membership at least are those who love the sound of the organ but don't play themselves = at all, and also know little about music beyond recognising the most famous = 10 bits of organ music you can think of. Ross -----Original Message----- From: Rodney West <rodneywest72@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, February 04, 2002 4:09 AM Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS     >--- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: >> >> Actually, I go to organ concerts to hear the organ. >> I'm not as concerned >> with what, who, or how the organ is played as long >> as it's well demonstrated >> and the performance at least includes most of the >> notes in the right order. >> For me, the point of going to a recital is to hear a >> pipe organ. If the >> music touches and inspires me, it's a bonus. I >> just love hearing pipes >> tooting! > >Gillian Weir once said that she absolutely hates it >when someone comes up to her following one of her >recitals and says, "You demonstrated the organ >beautifully!" She feels they missed the whole point >of her concert and work. She finds it insulting to >her own intelligence. I think any true, thinking and >feeling artist would agree. > >Music is the Art and the artist is the vehicle through >which it is communicated. The instrument is the >medium. > >A great artist can make a mediocre organ sound very >good--Virgil Fox did that all the time! A mediocre >artist can make a fine instrument sometimes sound not >as good as as it really is. > >If all one is interested in is only the instrument, >why bother even going to concerts? Should one simply >arrange time to sit down at the organ, press down keys >and hear "pipes tooting"? > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Great stuff seeking new owners in Yahoo! Auctions! >http://auctions.yahoo.com > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: From Alexander Frey:re. Critique etc. From: <AFberlin2@aol.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 14:18:43 EST   My dear friends,   The postings regarding the importance of instrument vs. performance have = been sent to me by a friend on your list. I found the discussion between Mike, =   Rodney and Bruce to be extremely interesting and pertinent at this point = in musical history, particularly during the current era of organ performance = and composition.   I only know a few people on your list personally, but I sure would like to =   know more of you; you strike me as being people who actually think and are =   open to debating your points of view--all which are indeed salient and = worthy of discourse. I don't personally subscribe to chat lists. Nothing personal-it's only that my schedule doesn't allow the time to be a real participant. But as a conductor, organist and pianist, I find this particular topic of great personal interest, and I am joining your list momentarily to give my humble perspective. The following doesn't negate = any viewpoint previously expressed; in fact, each opinion already recorded on this topic of this list is extremely valid and actually not in = disagreement with one another. So with the kind permission of this most august body of =   lovers of the organ and its music, I would like to just use this moment to =   express my thoughts on this most important subject. I don't expect = everyone to agree with me--and that's perfectly okay. It would be a pretty dull affair if we all had exactly the same opinion.   As some of you may know, I'm one who does work in the "music world = at-large." But my first love since I was a child has been the organ. And maybe it = is because I've been blessed with a musical career in other mediums that I am =   particularly concerned with the place of the organ and it's performers and =   music in the musical hemisphere. I want the organ and organ performance = to be fully accepted as legitimate art forms by the rest of the music world. =   Unfortunately, it is not. I have tried to lobby for organ soloists on various programs I've been engaged to do as guest conductor, only to be = told that there is "no interest" from the public. Once in a while, I'm able to =   bring in somebody with my own orchestra, but must plead with the = management to do so. I know from colleagues of mine who are music directors of orchestras in halls where there are good pipe instruments, that they can really only get away with using the organ as a concerto solo instrument = once or twice in a season because of audience preferences. Isn't this a truly = sad state of affairs? Look at the number of concert halls in the world that = have pipe organs-and relatively new ones, at that. There are more than you = think. In Asia, it seems that every time a new concert hall is built, in goes a = new organ. In Germany, almost every major concert hall as a pipe organ. Many = of the concert halls in England and France do as well. Look at Chicago, = Dallas, Boston, Seattle, Jacksonville, Cleveland, the new Disney Hall in Los = Angeles, Woolsey Hall in New Haven and Alice Tully Hall in New York City. Let's = also not forget Hartford and Portland. During the inaugural season of any new concert hall organ, there will be many events surrounding the new = instrument. But that trails of in the following years. There are a few exceptions: = for example, Dallas makes very good use of their organ. Let's hope the same = for the other cities.   Now with that lengthy preamble, why isn't the organ more accepted as a legitimate musical art form?   I agree with you, Mike, on the points about the beauty of the instrument, = and I fully understand how that could be the sole focus of someone attending a =   recital. We are all transported by the beautiful sounds emanating from a glorious organ. And we all want the performing artist to use the = instrument in a wonderful, complete way..one that shows off a particular instrument = at its best.   However, for me--and this is just my own personal opinion--if I am = listening to a performance that is really boring and unmusical, I try to get from it =   what I can glean, but also feel the experience somewhat empty inside. I = may come away with admiration for the instrument, but it that alone is not = enough to fulfill me as a listening participant. Again, this is only my own viewpoint.   Your example of the comparison of a listener in a piano recital or = symphony orchestra concert is a superb one. But it may also point out one of the reasons why the organ and organists are tragically not truly accepted as = part of the general musical world, and also why attendance at organ recitals suffers so much. The highest attendance for an organ performance-outside = of AGO conventions-may very well be that of a symphony orchestra that is featuring an organ concerto, say, in Chicago's Orchestra Hall or Symphony Hall in Boston. For those 3000-4500 people who will be filling the halls = for such an event (or, in the case of a subscription series where the program might be repeated 3 or 4 times in one week, thereby bringing the = attendance of an organ performance to about 12,000-17,000 people <!>) it may be one = of the few times in their lives that most of them will be attending a live = organ performance in a concert setting (outside of hearing the organ in a church = or synagogue during services.) They will, of course, be enthralled by the = sheer sound of full organ in partnership with the squadrons of brass = instruments, strings, winds and percussion. They will also marvel at the lush, softer combinations of stops. It will be first the instrument which will claim their interest. But then their eyes will be focused on that person using their hands and (!) feet, producing the music coming from the instrument. =   They will begin to notice whether he is watching the conductor, being musically sensitive to his colleagues in the orchestra, decide whether or = not they even like the piece, then see if the performance of soloist and orchestra moves them. If it is not a particularly good performance, they will respond with polite applause at best, and the local critic will write =   about how the organist wasn't sensitive to the orchestra or conductor. In =   other words, the organist (and, subsequently, the organ) will be judged in =   the same way and on a par as any other soloist (violinist, pianist, = singer, etc.). The MUSICAL expectations end up overriding any other concerns. = And if the performance is not up to the level expected of any other kind of soloist, this, of course, may very well contribute to relegating the organ =   and organists to a very low place on the musical world's totem pole. It's = a sad thing, and I think that's why we all have to broaden our horizons = more. And maybe being judged on the same level as our colleagues in other = musical mediums will make us stand up and take notice and ask ourselves how we can =   bring the organ and organ performance into the musical mainstream. This = will directly affect the future of our instrument as a whole. And reflecting = on your excellent points of your posting, I think that, more than that of any =   other classical musical instrument-except the human voice-an organ recital = is a listening experience that is broader in its totality: we hear the music, =   the player and the instrument as one--as a complete whole. But, again, my =   own feeling is that if one of these ingredients is not up to par, then the =   overall experience can suffer. Of course, a great artist can overcome the =   deficiencies of an organ that is not a great one.   This last sentence brings up the idea that a violin soloist would never perform a concert on an inferior instrument. A major pianist often gets = to choose the best piano for his performance. As organists, we don't have = this choice. We do, however, have the ability to choose an excellent organ builder when our institutions are considering a new instrument. No matter =   what the size, an excellent design and superb musical voicing will result = in a superior instrument--hopefully in a room with decent acoustics, but even = in a dead room, excellent voicing has beautiful results.   Regarding Miss Weir, I do not think her opinion one of arrogance, but that = of a performing artist who has worked VERY hard, sometimes on rather = inadequate instruments, to excite, thrill and move us through the beauty of the composer. A beautiful organ simply just does not come alive without music =   being played on it. I have discussed this very issue with Gillian on a few occasions, the most =   recent time in December at the reception following my performance in = London's Wigmore Hall, which she attended. We both know that the organ is one of = the greatest living, breathing instruments of music. I think her great wish = is the same as mine: to bring the organ into the mainstream of the general = music world, hugely expand our public and educate all of our listeners into the limitless musical and tonal possibilities of the instrument, expose new listeners to great literature both past and present, played in a = completely musically compelling way that is equally on a par with the greatest = soloists in other musical mediums-and that the organ and its performers would have = the opportunity and acceptance to be judged as such. It would be then that we =   would walk into a church, synagogue or concert hall on a Sunday afternoon = to hear one of our colleagues play a recital, look around and notice that the =   building is filled to capacity and know that this is the normal attendance =   for an organ recital.  
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 15:19:37 EST     --part1_a3.231293d2.298ef559_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/3/02 10:09:24 AM Eastern Standard Time, rodneywest72@yahoo.com writes:   Gillian Weir once said that she absolutely hates it when someone comes up = to her following one of her recitals and says, "You demonstrated the organ beautifully!" She feels they missed the whole point of her concert and = work. She finds it insulting to her own intelligence. I think any true, thinking and feeling artist would =   agree.   With all due respect to her Weirness, I find this very arrogant but not surprising from a concert artist/showperson. She would probably rather = have people say how much they liked her dress that how much they like the = organ. Just because a person's primary interest is the instrument and how it sounds when played, as opposed to "tooted" does not mean they do not appreciate the artist as well as the music. One of my primary = irritations at OHS recitals is when organists go up afterward to look at a beautiful historic instrument and just draw stops and "toot." The beauty of the = organ is fully appreciated in its playing. In addition, the compliment that = an artist demonstrated the organ well is certainly a compliment for which far =   too many touring folk are unworthy. I've been to recitals by "big names" = who used only two of the fifteen to twenty solos sounds on the organ, and proportionately few of the other possible ensemble combinations as well. = A true artist exploits the entire instrument, and that does not mean ALL AT ONCE!   <If all one is interested in is only the instrument, why bother even going = to concerts? Should one simply arrange time to sit down at the organ, press down keys and hear "pipes tooting"?>   .... an unfortunatle, yet typical overstatement. The reason one attends concerts rather than just dropping by to "toot" is to hear the organ in = use from various parts of the building and to hear how it can be used to = "deliver the literature." I think it is myopic to place the artist as the most important and supreme part of the equation.           Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 >   --part1_a3.231293d2.298ef559_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 2/3/02 10:09:24 AM Eastern Standard Time, rodneywest72@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR>Gillian Weir once said that she absolutely hates it when someone comes = up to her following one of her recitals and says, "You demonstrated the = organ beautifully!" &nbsp;She feels they missed the whole point of her = concert and work. &nbsp;She finds it insulting to <BR>her own intelligence. &nbsp;I think any true, thinking and feeling = artist would agree. <BR> <BR>With all due respect to her Weirness, I find this very arrogant but = not surprising from a concert artist/showperson. &nbsp;&nbsp;She would = probably rather have people say how much they liked her dress that how = much they like the organ. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Just because a person's = primary interest is the instrument and how it sounds when played, as = opposed to "tooted" does not mean they do not appreciate the artist as = well as the music. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;One of my primary irritations at OHS = recitals is when organists go up afterward to look at a beautiful historic = instrument and just draw stops and "toot." &nbsp;&nbsp;The beauty of the = organ is fully appreciated in its playing. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;In addition, = the compliment that an artist demonstrated the organ well is certainly a = compliment for which far too many touring folk are unworthy. &nbsp;I've = been to recitals by "big names" who used only two of the fifteen to twenty = solos sounds on the organ, and proportionately few of th <BR> <BR>&lt;If all one is interested in is only the instrument, why bother even going = to concerts? &nbsp;Should one simply arrange time to sit down at the = organ, press down keys and hear "pipes tooting"?&gt; <BR> <BR>... an unfortunatle, yet typical overstatement. &nbsp;The reason one = attends concerts rather than just dropping by to "toot" is to hear the = organ in use from various parts of the building and to hear how it can be = used to "deliver the literature." &nbsp;&nbsp;I think it is myopic to = place the artist as the most important and supreme part of the equation. <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt; &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_a3.231293d2.298ef559_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Epiphany 4A and some good news From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 14:26:46 -0600   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida   4 Epiphany, Year A   Service music: Powell/Willan   Prelude: Andante from Sonata No. 1 Intermezzo from Sonata No. 3 - Josef Rheinberger (1839 - 1901) Processional Hymn: O God, St. Agatha's reward (Deo gracias) - insert Sequence Hymn: O God, our help in ages past (St. Anne) - H 680 Offertory Hymn: O Master, let me walk with thee (Maryton) - H 660 Music during Communion: Blessed Jesus, at thy word (Liebster Jesu; text H 440) - J. S. Bach What does the Lord require (Sharpthorne; text H 605) Closing Hymn: Rejoice, ye pure in heart (Marion) - H 556 Postlude: A Trumpet Minuet - Alfred Hollins (1865 - 1942)   Guess what, Michael Barone! After setting up at the church, I decided to run to the store and pick up some flowers today for the St. Agatha in honor of her feast day Tuesday. I had earlier reported that PipeDreams had been taken off the only area radio station carrying it. Guess what - it has been moved to 9:00 a.m.! Although I'm already at church and will still miss most or all of it, at least others in the area who would not otherwise be exposed to organ music will now get to hear it. Isn't that fabulous news? I would never have known except for the sudden urge to buy flowers for the virgin martyr.   One week I'm up, the next I'm down. I really like Rheinberger, and was even going to do the slow movement from the 2d sonata, but decided that because I like the whole sonata so much, I would learn it to do sometime during Lent. I even got the Hollins down pat for today.   No one would come to the priest's Sunday School, so he decided to do confirmation classes for the last 4 Sundays of Epiphany instead of a sermon/homily. Today was a "demonstration Eucharist", which might have been a good idea if actually tied to Christian ideals and theology, if he would connect the acts to the holy symbolism behind them. However, it became a mere vocabulary lesson on the terms for the clergy's clothes and the communion implements. How one man can take something as beautiful and full of grace as Holy Eucharist and turn it into mundane drivel and a Baptist-like "let's announce everything we are doing for the morons that can't see it for themselves" has to be some kind of art form or true talent. And on the Sunday immediately preceding our patron's feast day. Why one would attend church at all when the entire spiritual is thrown out and minimized beyond all recognition is beyond me.   Just as I started the postlude the acolyte got tangled up in one of the rugs and fell down with a clatter in front of everyone, so I cut Hollins extremely short so that I could check on him. He said nothing was hurt other than his pride. It was a sign from God to quit and go home.   Rick and I did our part for the economy - we are the proud owners of new cookware. Other than a few pieces, I had nothing but the cookware from 23 years plus ago when we got married, and a cheap set from when I lived in Tallahassee. So we finally broke down and bought ourselves some yesterday. Now I gotta find somewhere to put it.   I still haven't found Peter Storandt - hope all is well in Oklahoma City.   Regards on a beautiful sunny and mild Florida Sunday,   Glenda Sutton