PipeChat Digest #2685 - Sunday, February 3, 2002
 
DETROIT FOX WURLITZER   Re: Detroit Fox Console
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: DETROIT FOX WURLITZER Re: Detroit Fox Console From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 15:58:06 EST     --part1_a4.2089662b.298efe5e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hello All   This was sent to me by a list member after my Detroit Fox Console post = last night and, as I find the information enjoyable and very informative, I = want to share it with all of you. Please remember that I am digging back into = my mind over 10 years ago for these accounts, but am endeavoring to be as accurate as possible with all of this information.   Scott Foppiano   * * * * *   In a message dated 2/3/02 3:59:32 AM Eastern Standard Time, = NickGTV@webtv.net writes:   > First, I wanted to thank you for your Fox posting--I found your > restoration description really interesting.   Hi there- thanks for writing. The organ was not restored, so to speak, = from top to bottom in a "historical manner"- rather it was brought back to life =   and back into very fine condition over a period of several years. In = fact, from what I know, Roger still works down at the theatre on Mondays. There = is always something to do in an instrument that big and spread out.     > Also, if it wouldn't be too big an imposition, would you mind describing > what playing a Fox Special was like, how you found the Detroit's > voicing, any recollections?   Playing the Detroit Fox is unlike any other organ I have ever experienced, =   including those of the Memphis Municipal Auditorium (V/110 Kimball, 1926) = and Wanamakers.   The delay from the console is very obvious. This is because of a) = distance from the pipes to the players ears and b) cavernous acoustics in the 5000+ =   seat auditorium. While this never really bothered me due to the years I played the Memphis Kimball, which had an even worse delay, I know of some organists who would =   play a few chords and slow down and slow down and slow down until they literally stopped and had to start again while getting used to that feel = and sound. Also, the organ is on its original, pneumatic/mechanical relay = which I believe adds a bit of sluggishness given the immense size, scope and lay =   out of the organ.   When you sit at the main console in the pit the sound is to either side, = way above you and slightly behind you. Basically you hear it bounce back from = in the room to your ears instead of a direct sound, but it is indeed a HUGE sound and a very beautiful and distinct sound, and that's the only way I = can describe it.   Now compared to the other 4/36's, the sounds of the pipes in the Detroit = Fox and the Times Square Paramount are reported to have gotten out of the chambers with the most success. Though the Paramount had the most shallow =   chambers of all 5 of the 4/36 Wurlitzers, the Detroit organ just seems to have no trouble getting out. I played the St. Louis Fox about 10 years = ago and recall it having a very definite difference in its sound, as if it = were more distant. Remember that the two theatres (Detroit and St. Louis) are identical twins, though there are minute differences, most notably in the layout of the grand lobbies. St. Louis just didn't have the bold assertiveness of Detroit, at least not to my ears. I have spoken with = others who agree with this sentiment. San Francisco's sound had to get out of = more narrow tone openings, through draperies and around columns. Despite these =   conditions it supposedly got out well enough and sounded grand. The sound =   the Times Square Paramount has been described as "electric" due to the = very shallow chambers and unusually good sound egress from the chambers into = the auditorium. I believe that the Paramount's chambers only had a very = slight scrim cloth in front of the chamber openings. The Brooklyn Fox Wurlitzer = was by far the least impressive because it was VERY buried in deep chambers = and too had to get out through thick draperies and around alot of heavy, decorative plaster work in front of the chambers. Even long time Brooklyn =   organist Rosa Rio told me that it didn't get out like the rest, but I have =   always heard that Detroit and the Paramount were the most successful as far as overall sound egress from the chambers.   The voicing, now, is far different from what people heard from the organ's =   installation through about 1991-92. As we all know, the companies that = built theatre organs literally barely got them into their chambers and got the consoles sitting on their lifts before they were called away to install = the next one. This was especially true in 1927-29. The Detroit Fox even had wire connections which were never soldered.   Anyway, around 1990 or 91 Roger started to open up the toe holes of, I believe, the string ranks first, making a DRAMATIC difference in the = ensemble sound of the organ. Just as with the physical installation of these = organs, Wurlitzer and others really did not do tonal finishing on site, there = simply wasn't time in those days. As he described it to me there was hardly any = air at all making its way into the pipes. I do remember them being VERY = demure the first season I played at the Fox (1990). Then he started smoothing = them out and regulating. Next he would work on flues and reeds and whatever needed working on. All this time, he was reengineering the expression = motors so that the shades would open as far as possible. Prior to that they only =   opened about 40-50 degrees. That greatly improved the sound too.   The last time I played the Fox organ was last year for the annual = Christmas Spectacular starring the Rockettes. Roger has done alot in bringing that organ back to life. It was never really dead, but had gotten into some disrepair to where every rank had dead notes and cyphers were occurring somewhat regularly. The organ had been down for several years prior to = and during the theatre's restoration. The console was put back on its lift in =   the pit during the theatre's restoration and used again publicly for the first time in 1989 for the ATOS national convention.   June 1990 saw the Fox show "Ben Hur" as the first of the Fox summer movie series and this was also the first public use of the organ in many years. = My friend Tony O'Brien played that night, and quite impressively I might add. = Charlton Heston and his mother were in attendance from Hollywood to = receive an award. I had just moved to Detroit and had been invited by Greg = Bellamy (Fox Operations Manager) to attend. I watched and listened in amazement = as the huge golden console rose out of the pit that first time! Anyway, afterward and when the crowd had left, Greg allowed me to try the organ. = I played "Everything's Coming Up Roses" which was the song that I had won = the Yamaha Electone Competition with a few years before while in high school. = He hired me on the spot and the next afternoon I played the big Wurlitzer for =   the first time in public for the matinee.   It was then that the Monday night volunteers started releathering and = working with Roger and Greg on the organ. The organ was played for movies every summer and on special occasion, and whenever some show did not sell seats = in the orchestra pit, mandating that the hole for the console lift be covered =   over for patrons' chairs. During that first season the console was raised =   and lowered by usage of the backstage console lift switch. Apparently = Peter Clark, Inc. always put two switches on the larger installations and bigger =   houses, but the console lift switch had long since been removed as had the =   blower switch. That first year (1990) the organist had to go to the sub basement and push the button which was mounted on the back wall between = the two huge 50 hp Spencer blowers. Needless to say one pushed that button = and RAN (literally) back out of the blower room before those things could = really wind up. The next season (1991) some rewiring had been done and we only = had to go into the supply room next to the Building Engineer's office and = throw a copper knife switch to start the blower. I never could decide which was worse: that deafening roar in the sub basement or the sparks which would literally fly off the knife switch if it wasn't thrown or pulled fast = enough. Thankfully, Spring of 1992 saw the return of both the blower switch and console lift switch to the console. The blower switch was mounted on the back of the console so that the organist would activate it upon going = through the little organist's door into the orchestra pit and onto the console = lift. I still question now, as I did then, whether the lift switches belong on = the right or left side of the keydesk. It was put on the right, however my thinking was and still is that theatre organists do their really = impressive playing with the right hand and it is easier to push the "up" or "down" button with the left hand while the right hand is playing. But, = regardless, they are back on the console where they belong and work as they should.   I remember well the first movie series of Summer 1992 when the pistons had =   been revived for the first time in, literally, decades. They even added a =   small winker to the bottom side of the floor of the console lift to assist = it along, which it did very well. I remember all the "ka-thump-a, ka-thump-a-ka-thump" sounds of using those pistons and how wonderful it = was to finally be able to do seamless and quick registration changes on such a =   huge instrument without having to try doing it by hand as we all had done = for two years.   Work progressed and the organ got better and better. By the national ATOS =   convention in 1996 it was in the best shape that it had ever been. Today = the organ's main use is at Christmas time for the Rockettes Show, and the = slave console is used. It was unearthed from below the stage in 1988 and moved = up to the right colonnade, where it lives now. Sadly, as stated in my other post, the main console was damaged by a careless stage hand lowering the = pit lift onto it with the console hole cover in place (with steel eye beams) = and I do not know where that currently stands. Last I heard about two years = ago it was being repaired out of house and professionally. I hope so.   The sounds of that organ (or any of the big Wurlitzers) is one that has to = be experienced in person. Remember that those organs all had (have) 3 tibias =   (Orchestral, Solo and Foundation chambers), 4 Vox Humanas (Orchestral, = Solo, Main and Foundation chambers), two trumpets (brass in Solo and Main), multiple string and celeste ranks (Gamba and Celeste, Viol d'Orchestra and =   celeste, Salicional and celeste, Solo String et al) as well as Open, Horn = and high pressure Diaphonic Diapasons. The Diaphonic, of course, extended = down to low 32' CCCC which is a sound which is exciting, awe inspiring and = scary all at the same time.   I would like to add that only the Brooklyn Fox had 37 ranks, that last = rank being a Dulciana Celeste which, from all accounts, may as well have not = even been there because it was completely inaudible. This has indeed been verified by Rosa Rio and my friend Bob Miloche of New Jersey who worked = with organ builder Mel Robinson and who played the Brooklyn Wurlitzer in the = 60's. Brooklyn also disconnected the 12 pipes of the 32' Diaphone extension because they were located in the top of the stage house and shared a = common wall with theatre offices. As a result, they were constantly rearranging = the office furniture! I am not sure where that set of 12 pipes is now. I do know that the 6 "trapdoor" 32' Diaphones from Detroit's United Artists Theatre are now in the Berkley Community Theatre Wurlitzer in California. = AS far as I know the Brooklyn organ found its way to a restaurant in Ft. = Wayne, Indiana and subsequently went to the former Wilcox residence in Gig = Harbor, Washington. San Francisco of course went to the Lanterman Estate and is = now in the El Capitan Theatre and the Times Square Paramount went to the = Century II Center in Wichita, Kansas after being in storage where, sadly, the original console perished in a fire.   The 4/36's all had (have) three xylophones, all reiterating, a glockenspiel and reiterating orchestral bells, tuned tympani (affectionately referred = to in Detroit as "tuned wash tubs") and multiple bass drums, three cymbals, snare drums, a triangle and two sets of chimes (standard and solo scale, = the latter of which hang in the chamber housing the low 12 pipes of the 32' Diaphone extension and the master xylophone). The 4/36's also have all of =   the traps and sound effects and toys expected on the biggest instruments.   I believe there are 18 or 19 trems in the 4/36 organs. I counted once but =   have forgotten the exact number. I do remember the following trems for certain:   Orchestral Tibia, Solo Tibia, Foundation Tibia, Tuba Mirabilis, English = Post Horn, Solo Chamber, Main Chamber, Foundation Chamber, Orchestral Chamber, Main Vox, Foundation Vox, Solo Vox, Orchestral Vox. I think there were = also separate trems for the Solo Trumpet and Tuba Horn as well.   A tremulant (Barton, in fact!) was later added to the big Diaphonic = Diapason as they were originally installed without trems. It was during the year prior to the 1996 national ATOS convention that the Accompaniment to = Bombarde coupler was turned into a much more useful Great Super to Bombarde.   While George Wright's recordings from San Francisco are indeed good and = give us a historic link to a fabulous player on a fabulous instrument, I always =   felt that the microphones were too close to the chambers when the = instrument was recorded and, as a result, never had the correct balance of = organ-in-room sound. Raymond Shelly's LP from the 1950's rather faithfully captured the =   Detroit sound. The definitive example however, if one really wants to = hear the "Detroit sound," is Simon Gledhill's "The Fox Album." It truly IS the =   sound of the Fox organ in that huge barn of a room, and as is customary = with Simon, the playing is beautiful, sensitive and exceptionally musical in = every way.   The organ plays and plays well. It is a huge sound. The pipes are now speaking unimpeded at full pressure and the expression shades are opening = as far as they physically can. The sound really gets out into the house now = and does not sound distant as it used to. Nor do the wind leaks sound like Niagara Falls anymore when the blower comes on. In fact- there really is = not any wind noise to speak of anymore. It is very good! I hope it continues = to be played and improved because it is a very special, magical, and historic =   instrument.     As a child, I happened to see the San> > Francisco Fox being torn down; later my very first TO album was one of > the "Farewell To The Fox" volumes, so I have a special place for the > 4/36s. As one rarely finds someone who's merely seen one up close, let > alone actually played one, I'd be extremely interested in any insights > you might be able to share.   I don't know if I could watch a movie palace or a church being demolished. = I have that old video of the San Francisco Fox coming down and it bothers me = a great deal. I hope my comments above answered some questions.   Scott Foppiano   --part1_a4.2089662b.298efe5e_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hello All<BR> <BR> This was sent to me by a list member after my Detroit Fox Console post = last night and, as I find the information enjoyable and very informative, = I want to share it with all of you.&nbsp; Please remember that I am = digging back into my mind over 10 years ago for these accounts, but am = endeavoring to be as accurate as possible with all of this = information.<BR> <BR> Scott Foppiano<BR> <BR> * * * * *<BR> <BR> In a message dated 2/3/02 3:59:32 AM Eastern Standard Time, = NickGTV@webtv.net writes:<BR> <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp; <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">First, I = wanted to thank you for your Fox posting--I found your<BR> restoration description really interesting.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi there- thanks = for writing.&nbsp; The organ was not restored, so to speak, from top to = bottom in a "historical manner"- rather it was brought back to life and = back into very fine condition over a period of several years.&nbsp; In = fact, from what I know, Roger still works down at the theatre on = Mondays.&nbsp; There is always something to do in an instrument that big = and spread out.<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Also, if it = wouldn't be too big an imposition, would you mind describing<BR> what playing a Fox Special was like, how you found the Detroit's<BR> voicing, any recollections?&nbsp; </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Playing the = Detroit Fox is unlike any other organ I have ever experienced, including = those of the Memphis Municipal Auditorium (V/110 Kimball, 1926) and = Wanamakers.<BR> <BR> The delay from the console is very obvious.&nbsp; This is because of a) = distance from the pipes to the players ears and b) cavernous acoustics in = the 5000+ seat auditorium.&nbsp; <BR> While this never really bothered me due to the years I played the Memphis = Kimball, which had an even worse delay, I know of some organists who would = play a few chords and slow down and slow down and slow down until they = literally stopped and had to start again while getting used to that feel = and sound.&nbsp; Also, the organ is on its original, pneumatic/mechanical = relay which I believe adds a bit of sluggishness given the immense size, = scope and lay out of the organ.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> When you sit at the main console in the pit the sound is to either side, = way above you and slightly behind you.&nbsp; Basically you hear it bounce = back from in the room to your ears instead of a direct sound, but it is = indeed a HUGE sound and a very beautiful and distinct sound, and that's = the only way I can describe it.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Now compared to the other 4/36's, the sounds of the pipes in the Detroit = Fox and the Times Square Paramount are reported to have gotten out of the = chambers with the most success.&nbsp; Though the Paramount had the most = shallow chambers of all 5 of the 4/36 Wurlitzers, the Detroit organ just = seems to have no trouble getting out.&nbsp; I played the St. Louis Fox = about 10 years ago and recall it having a very definite difference in its = sound, as if it were more distant.&nbsp; Remember that the two theatres = (Detroit and St. Louis) are identical twins, though there are minute = differences, most notably in the layout of the grand lobbies.&nbsp; St. = Louis just didn't have the bold assertiveness of Detroit, at least not to = my ears.&nbsp; I have spoken with others who agree with this = sentiment.&nbsp; San Francisco's sound had to get out of more narrow tone = openings, through draperies and around columns.&nbsp; Despite these = conditions it supposedly got out well enough and sounded grand.&nbsp; The <BR> The voicing, now, is far different from what people heard from the organ's = installation through about 1991-92.&nbsp; As we all know, the companies = that built theatre organs literally barely got them into their chambers = and got the consoles sitting on their lifts before they were called away = to install the next one.&nbsp; This was especially true in 1927-29.&nbsp; = The Detroit Fox even had wire connections which were never soldered.<BR> <BR> Anyway, around 1990 or 91 Roger started to open up the toe holes of, I believe, the string ranks first, making a DRAMATIC = difference in the ensemble sound of the organ.&nbsp; Just as with the = physical installation of these organs, Wurlitzer and others really did not = do tonal finishing on site, there simply wasn't time in those days.&nbsp; = As he described it to me there was hardly any air at all making its way = into the pipes.&nbsp; I do remember them being VERY demure the first = season I played at the Fox (1990).&nbsp; Then he started smoothing them = out and regulating.&nbsp; Next he would work on flues and reeds and = whatever needed working on.&nbsp; All this time, he was reengineering the = expression motors so that the shades would open as far as possible.&nbsp; = Prior to that they only opened about 40-50 degrees.&nbsp; That greatly = improved the sound too.<BR> <BR> The last time I played the Fox organ was last year for the annual = Christmas Spectacular starring the Rockettes.&nbsp; Roger has done alot in = bringing that organ back to life.&nbsp; It was never really dead, but had = gotten into some disrepair to where every rank had dead notes and cyphers = were occurring somewhat regularly.&nbsp; The organ had been down for = several years prior to and during the theatre's restoration.&nbsp; The = console was put back on its lift in the pit during the theatre's = restoration and used again publicly for the first time in 1989 for the = ATOS national convention.&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> June 1990 saw the Fox show "Ben Hur" as the first of the Fox summer movie = series and this was also the first public use of the organ in many = years.&nbsp; My friend Tony O'Brien played that night, and quite = impressively I might add.&nbsp; Charlton Heston and his mother were in = attendance from Hollywood to receive an award.&nbsp; I had just moved to = Detroit and had been invited by Greg Bellamy (Fox Operations Manager) to = attend.&nbsp; I watched and listened in amazement as the huge golden = console rose out of the pit that first time!&nbsp; Anyway, afterward and = when the crowd had left, Greg allowed me to try the organ.&nbsp; I played = "Everything's Coming Up Roses" which was the song that I had won the = Yamaha Electone Competition with a few years before while in high = school.&nbsp; He hired me on the spot and the next afternoon I played the = big Wurlitzer for the first time in public for the matinee.<BR> <BR> It was then that the Monday night volunteers started releathering and = working with Roger and Greg on the organ.&nbsp; The organ was played for = movies every summer and on special occasion, and whenever some show did = not sell seats in the orchestra pit, mandating that the hole for the = console lift be covered over for patrons' chairs.&nbsp; During that first = season the console was raised and lowered by usage of the backstage = console lift switch.&nbsp; Apparently Peter Clark, Inc. always put two = switches on the larger installations and bigger houses, but the console = lift switch had long since been removed as had the blower switch.&nbsp; = That first year (1990) the organist had to go to the sub basement and push = the button which was mounted on the back wall between the two huge 50 hp = Spencer blowers.&nbsp; Needless to say one pushed that button and RAN = (literally) back out of the blower room before those things could really = wind up.&nbsp; The next season (1991) some rewiring had been done an <BR> I remember well the first movie series of Summer 1992 when the pistons had = been revived for the first time in, literally, decades.&nbsp; They even = added a small winker to the bottom side of the floor of the console lift = to assist it along, which it did very well.&nbsp; I remember all the = "ka-thump-a,&nbsp; ka-thump-a-ka-thump" sounds of using those pistons and = how wonderful it was to finally be able to do seamless and quick = registration changes on such a huge instrument without having to try doing = it by hand as we all had done for two years.<BR> <BR> Work progressed and the organ got better and better.&nbsp; By the national = ATOS convention in 1996 it was in the best shape that it had ever = been.&nbsp; Today the organ's main use is at Christmas time for the Rockettes Show, and the slave = console is used.&nbsp; It was unearthed from below the stage in 1988 and = moved up to the right colonnade, where it lives now.&nbsp; Sadly, as = stated in my other post, the main console was damaged by a careless stage = hand lowering the pit lift onto it with the console hole cover in place = (with steel eye beams) and I do not know where that currently = stands.&nbsp; Last I heard about two years ago it was being repaired out = of house and professionally.&nbsp; I hope so.<BR> <BR> The sounds of that organ (or any of the big Wurlitzers) is one that has to = be experienced in person.&nbsp; Remember that those organs all had (have) = 3 tibias (Orchestral, Solo and Foundation chambers), 4 Vox Humanas = (Orchestral, Solo, Main and Foundation chambers), two trumpets (brass in = Solo and Main), multiple string and celeste ranks (Gamba and Celeste, Viol = d'Orchestra and celeste, Salicional and celeste, Solo String et al) as = well as Open, Horn and high pressure Diaphonic Diapasons.&nbsp; The = Diaphonic, of course, extended down to low 32' CCCC which is a sound which = is exciting, awe inspiring and scary all at the same = time.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I would like to add that only the Brooklyn Fox had 37 ranks, that last = rank being a Dulciana Celeste which, from all accounts, may as well have = not even been there because it was completely inaudible.&nbsp; This has = indeed been verified by Rosa Rio and my friend Bob Miloche of New Jersey = who worked with organ builder Mel Robinson and who played the Brooklyn = Wurlitzer in the 60's.&nbsp; Brooklyn also disconnected the 12 pipes of = the 32' Diaphone extension because they were located in the top of the = stage house and shared a common wall with theatre offices.&nbsp; As a = result, they were constantly rearranging the office furniture!&nbsp; I am = not sure where that set of 12 pipes is now.&nbsp; I do know that the 6 = "trapdoor" 32' Diaphones from Detroit's United Artists Theatre are now in = the Berkley Community Theatre Wurlitzer in California.&nbsp; AS far as I = know the Brooklyn organ found its way to a restaurant in Ft. Wayne, = Indiana and subsequently went to the former Wilcox residence in Gig <BR> The 4/36's all had (have) three xylophones, all reiterating, a = glockenspiel and reiterating orchestral bells, tuned tympani = (affectionately referred to in Detroit as "tuned wash tubs") and multiple = bass drums, three cymbals, snare drums, a triangle and two sets of chimes = (standard and solo scale, the latter of which hang in the chamber housing = the low 12 pipes of the 32' Diaphone extension and the master = xylophone).&nbsp; The 4/36's also have all of the traps and sound effects = and toys expected on the biggest instruments.<BR> <BR> I believe there are 18 or 19 trems in the 4/36 organs.&nbsp; I counted = once but have forgotten the exact number.&nbsp; I do remember the = following trems for certain:<BR> <BR> Orchestral Tibia, Solo Tibia, Foundation Tibia, Tuba Mirabilis, English = Post Horn, Solo Chamber, Main Chamber, Foundation Chamber, Orchestral = Chamber, Main Vox, Foundation Vox, Solo Vox, Orchestral Vox.&nbsp; I think = there were also separate trems for the Solo Trumpet and Tuba Horn as = well.<BR> <BR> A tremulant (Barton, in fact!) was later added to the big Diaphonic = Diapason as they were originally installed without trems.&nbsp; It was = during the year prior to the 1996 national ATOS convention that the = Accompaniment to Bombarde coupler was turned into a much more useful Great = Super to Bombarde.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> While George Wright's recordings from San Francisco are indeed good and = give us a historic link to a fabulous player on a fabulous instrument, I = always felt that the microphones were too close to the chambers when the = instrument was recorded and, as a result, never had the correct balance of = organ-in-room sound.&nbsp; Raymond Shelly's LP from the 1950's rather = faithfully captured the Detroit sound.&nbsp; The definitive example = however, if one really wants to hear the "Detroit sound," is Simon = Gledhill's "The Fox Album."&nbsp; It truly IS the sound of the Fox organ in that huge barn of a room, and = as is customary with Simon, the playing is beautiful, sensitive and = exceptionally musical in every way.<BR> <BR> The organ plays and plays well.&nbsp; It is a huge sound.&nbsp; The pipes = are now speaking unimpeded at full pressure and the expression shades are = opening as far as they physically can.&nbsp; The sound really gets out = into the house now and does not sound distant as it used to.&nbsp; Nor do = the wind leaks sound like Niagara Falls anymore when the blower comes = on.&nbsp; In fact- there really is not any wind noise to speak of = anymore.&nbsp; It is very good!&nbsp; I hope it continues to be played and = improved because it is a very special, magical, and historic = instrument.<BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">&nbsp;&nbsp; = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">As a child, I = happened to see the San<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px"><BR> Francisco Fox being torn down; later my very first TO album was one of<BR> the "Farewell To The Fox" volumes, so I have a special place for the<BR> 4/36s.&nbsp; As one rarely finds someone who's merely seen one up close, = let<BR> alone actually played one, I'd be extremely interested in any insights<BR> you might be able to share.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> I don't know if I could watch a movie palace or a church being = demolished.&nbsp; I have that old video of the San Francisco Fox coming = down and it bothers me a great deal.&nbsp; I hope my comments above = answered some questions.<BR> <BR> Scott Foppiano<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_a4.2089662b.298efe5e_boundary--