PipeChat Digest #2689 - Tuesday, February 5, 2002
 
Re: Epiphany 4A and some good news
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Kent Tritle at St. Ignatius, New York 2/3/02
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: overprotective
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net>
Re: overprotective
  by <LLWheels@aol.com>
Re: GONFALONS
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Epiphany 4A and some good news From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 21:54:29 EST     --part1_9c.1a79e55c.2990a365_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   A gonfalon is a type of kite but more on the order of a, for lack of = better description, paper apple peel! They are usually made of multi-colored paper and when they are carried in procession attached to a long pole, the =   gonfalon spins festively in the breeze. They are absolutely wonderful. =   And I say this as a person who generally does not like toys in church! = They are a very fun addition to banners in a procession.     Bruce Cornely < Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Visit Howling Acres and meet the Baskerbeagles: Duncan, Miles, Molly & = Dewi < http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 >   --part1_9c.1a79e55c.2990a365_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>A gonfalon is a type of = kite but more on the order of a, for lack of better description, paper = apple peel! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;They are usually made of multi-colored paper = and when they are carried in procession attached to a long pole, the = gonfalon spins festively in the breeze. &nbsp;They are absolutely = wonderful. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;And I say this as a person who generally does = not like toys in church! &nbsp;&nbsp;They are a very fun addition to = banners in a procession. <BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce Cornely &lt; Cremona502@cs.com &gt;<I> </I> <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Visit Howling Acres <I>&nbsp;</I>and meet the Baskerbeagles: = &nbsp;Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&lt; &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &gt;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_9c.1a79e55c.2990a365_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Kent Tritle at St. Ignatius, New York 2/3/02 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 00:01:18 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   Listmember Rodney Myrvaagnes writes: "I didn't see Malcolm at this afternoon's recital, so I will report briefly."   To which I have to say, no wonder! But let me say first that, even way = back in the days when the Mander organ was just a twinkle in a few eyes on both sides of the Atlantic, I was beginning to build my excellent attendance record for events at St. Ignatius Loyola. I recall driving from Baltimore, where I was then living, in torrential rain, somehow finding a parking = spot, and entering a narthex filled with dripping people. The event was a performance with large orchestra of the Bruckner Te Deum. The occasion was = a commemoration of a date in the life of St. Ignatius himself. The church = was packed with Jesuits from all over, plus music lovers who were getting an early glimpse of the series that came to be known as Sacred Music in a Sacred Space, which it remains to this day. There was an organ - a quite = old and enormous and enormously hideous eight slice toaster (two four-manual consoles!). That had to have been at least ten years ago, and through a great deal of hard work with the very steady hand of Kent Tritle at the helm, music at St. Ignatius has developed a sure and sophisticated = audience, growing every year. So when I say "no wonder" Rodney did not see me, it = was because it pleases me to tell you that at least 400 people assembled for Kent's organ recital this afternoon (Sunday), quite well filling the = center aisles of the nave.   Rodney writes: "After the opening T&F in D 'Dorian' the entire program was in (or translated to) the language the organ speaks most naturally, the = late 19th Century French symphonic." MW responds: Yup, and with such an organ, = a question one often asks is "Can it play Bach?" I have to say that I took particular pleasure in the Dorian this afternoon because it affirmed that the organ could indeed play Bach, although after all these years, I had no doubts, and this particular piece, on an organ with a large Ruckpositif, = was a perfect vehicle. The spatial effect with one division on the rail and = the other, the Great, up on the second floor was really very fine. Two = beautiful choruses playing off against one another. One of the greatest Fugues is = this very one, and Kent began it on a very bold and rich registration, with = that velvety 16' Open on the Great under it, and allowed the intensity of the music to build. I found it thrilling. Robert Colasacco (who was at the concert) asked on Pipechat if organists would likely pass on information about their registrations, or would they guard the information jealously. Interestingly, I too wanted to know what Kent had used, and had planned to ask him after, but forgot. He would share. During that fabulous fugue, I found myself musing about how non-musicians or those not familiar with the Baroque repertoire in any form respond to this very lengthy, complex and thick strand of polyphony. Do they feel its tension and release, its majesty, its ability to pull one apart through Bach's astonishing melodic interactions (I think that means something!)? I have wondered that, during the great polyphonic section of the G Major Fantasy, which pulls me in the same way. There was, in this case, the evidence of some four hundred = people listening (and watching via closed circuit) with complete absorption. = That's good news.   Rodney writes: "The Reger Benedictus with a solo Harmonic Flute against strings sounded so French at the beginning I didn't know who wrote it without looking. Later it required button-pushing by the page turner to do the roll-schweller effect. It would have needed two well rehearsed registrants at St-Sulpice, I think."   Rodney writes: "Next was the second ever performance of Tryptich, by = Stephen Paulus. Again, Tritle let the organ sound its native voice, with fonds, strings, harmonic flute, big reeds all having their place. It could have been written for St. Ignatius, but was not, according to Paulus who was sitting behind me so I could ask." Malcolm adds: The work is in three movements: Like An Ever-Rolling Stream, Still Be My Vision, and As If The Whole Creation Cried. This was the first New York performance, and I think = I want to hear it again, perhaps more than once, to try to unlock what it = has to offer. I did not instantly warm to it, although that instant excitement does sometimes happen to me, and is not always an indication of lack of substance. There has been discussion on one of the Organ lists recently about contemporary music for organ and how so little of it is worth = hearing, and I don't buy that at all. To credential myself (a new verb is born, perhaps), I have to say that I love the works of, for example Peter Eben, and also much of Jean Guillou, William Mathias, Kenneth Leighton, Alain, Sowerby, Ligeti, and lots of earlier 20th century people - Pepping, = Walcha, and the like - and after I click "send" for this posting, I will realize I have left out a number more of great importance. Works of these people generally appealed immediately and the attraction remained. For what it is worth, this piece did not do it for me, at least not right away, and I = have only gotten into this discussion because of the topic having appeared on Pipechat - and I have to say that none of the names in my list above were found amongst the examples of composers of "unattractive music that was turning people off the organ," so there may just be a problem of breadth = of listening experience on the part of the person who started it all!   Rodney writes: "After intermission came as gripping a performance of Vierne's Symphonie # 1, Op. 14 as I have ever heard. Shut my eyes and I = was across the Atlantic. If Malcolm missed this for a football game he made a mistake, IMHO. (I am not saying he did.)" Well, Malcolm makes mistakes, = but certainly not that one. I'm here, and I have to say I am touched by = Rodney's characterization of the performance just because it reminds me of so much beauty, and I really think everyone there was indeed "gripped" by it. The first movement, Prelude, presents great waves of sound, swelling and diminishing, and as I heard Kent manipulating these, I thought of him conducting the St. Ignatius choirs, which I have watched and heard so many times, shaping phrases, and realized how much like the movement of grand choral forces this all is, with all the expressiveness that this implies - poetic music for a poet to mold to his will. Second movement, a four voice fugue, a beautiful subject begetting beautiful lines of counterpoint - a supple and powerful performance. Three, a Pastorale, with a warm flute registration I wanted to ask about, and, I think the Basson-Hautbois, and then the middle section for which Vierne calls for the Vox Humana and Tremulant. The St. Ignatius Vox has to be called voluptuous. Then the Allegro Vivace, a scherzo, often played by itself in concert - impeccable and fun all the way. The fifth movement, Andante, with more shifting = chords rather like the first movement, with lots of Celestes. Now, as is often = said of the Widor Fifth Symphony, it is great to hear the Toccata in context. Playing the entire symphony puts the Toccata in its place, as the finale = to all that has gone before. Same here. The Final, marked Allegro, is often played by itself, and one would not want to suggest that there is anything wrong with this, but how wonderful to hear it, as with the Widor, as the last statement of a great, towering, musical experience.   After the concert, Kent said: "I am playing at St. Thomas on Wednesday." "Oh, upstairs or downstairs, Taylor and Boody or the Skinner." "Oh, sorry, = I mean St. Thomas, Virgin Islands!" He flew out this morning, Monday, to be ready for a Wednesday concert, and then has had difficulty arranging to = get away right away. He will be stuck there for a few days! Keep your sympathy cards and letters coming, and I must say, I don't know too many in our = game who have earned this little break as much as he!   As for me, it is time for a nightly tradition around here. Hot Cocoa laced with Cointreau, with whipped cream on top. During Lent, we switch to = Kahlua! Quelle delicatesse! Good night, all.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com      
(back) Subject: RE: overprotective From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 23:13:22 -0600   > Does anyone on this list feel that her/his registrations are not = something > to be shared? Do you feel you have to protect your registrations from > others?   I'm almost certain we had this discussion on a list somewhere, and I couldn't understand then why anyone would want to hide their = registrations. For the life of me, I can't imagine what someone would want to protect. = If, for example, you are hiding it out of embarrassment...well, that says to = me that you know there's something "wrong" and in need of education. If = you're hiding them just because you don't want someone else to see them, then I question the validity of that thought. That question would be, straight up..."WHY"???? To what means does that serve? It's not like someone with = a bit of knowledge and a quick ear couldn't figure it out...oh, let's = see...I hear a 1-3/5' and a 2-2/3, so I'd guess there's a cornet set up, and I'll = go to my organ and see if I can mimic it.   Registration is something that most organists figure out, either through education or experimentation, and in my not-so-humble opinion, protecting them from other people is childish and silly. This sort of thing contributes to that snooty sort of attitude that we get accused of having. It's like, why can't we all get along and rejoice together in our art = rather than being selfish and stand-off-ish? Why are we competing??   Good question, Robert, and I am sorry if I offend anyone with my reply, but...I mean what I say. :-)   Jeff    
(back) Subject: Re: overprotective From: <LLWheels@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 00:12:00 EST     --part1_137.8dc279d.2990c3a0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 2/4/02 9:00:11 PM Central Standard Time, Robert = Colasacco writes:     > Does anyone on this list feel that her/his registrations are not = something > to be shared? Do you feel you have to protect your registrations from > others? > It may be a silly question but I thought I'd ask anyway. I only occurred = to > me after having heard the playing of Bach's Dorian d Toccata and Fugue = last > evening magnificently played and thinking I'd like to know what > registration > the organist was using because it was so perfectly crisp, clear and full   This is an interesting discussion in light of some postings here several months ago where I argued that the registrations were, indeed, the intellectual property of the performer who registered them. This was, however, concerning a situation of an organist who was summarily dismissed =   with the threat that any non-organist could replace him simply by pushing = the buttons with his registration. In that case I strongly recommended that = the former organist set all the pistons to cancel.   OTOH, I should think any good organist would be flattered and pleased to share a particularly effective registration with a fellow organist - I = know I would (like THAT would ever happen).   Larry L. Wheelock Madison, Wisconsin   "SI HOC LEGERE SCIS NIMIUM ERUDITONIS HABES"   --part1_137.8dc279d.2990c3a0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 2/4/02 = 9:00:11 PM Central Standard Time, Robert Colasacco writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Does anyone on = this list feel that her/his registrations are not something<BR> to be shared? Do you feel you have to protect your registrations from<BR> others? <BR> It may be a silly question but I thought I'd ask anyway. I only occurred = to<BR> me after having heard the playing of Bach's Dorian d Toccata and Fugue = last<BR> evening magnificently played and thinking I'd like to know what = registration<BR> the organist was using because it was so perfectly crisp, clear and = full</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> This is an interesting discussion in light of some postings here several = months ago where I argued that the registrations were, indeed, the = intellectual property of the performer who registered them. This was, = however, concerning a situation of an organist who was summarily dismissed = with the threat that any non-organist could replace him simply by pushing = the buttons with his registration. In that case I strongly recommended = that the former organist set all the pistons to cancel.<BR> <BR> OTOH, I should think any good organist would be flattered and pleased to = share a particularly effective registration with a fellow organist - I = know I would (like THAT would ever happen).<BR> <BR> Larry L. Wheelock<BR> Madison, Wisconsin<BR> <BR> "SI HOC LEGERE SCIS NIMIUM ERUDITONIS HABES"</FONT></HTML>   --part1_137.8dc279d.2990c3a0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: GONFALONS From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 00:28:35 -0500   A most wonderful hymntune, by Percy Buck, is called Gonfalon Royal, as in The Royal Banners Forward Go.     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karl Keller" <kkeller1@stny.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, February 04, 2002 8:56 PM Subject: Re: GONFALONS     > A banner suspended from a crossbar which is/can be > carried in a procession. >