PipeChat Digest #2695 - Friday, February 8, 2002
 
RE: en chamade
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: en chamade
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: en chamade
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Wanted-Jonas Nordwall E-mail address. (cross-posted)
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: Saint Thomas' Chamade
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
RE: Saint Thomas' Chamade
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Swedes and English
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
RE: *WAY* OFF-TOPIC: Leo XIII and the validity of AnglicanOrders,etc.
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
RE: correction from me
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
Re: Wanted-Jonas Nordwall E-mail address. (cross-posted)
  by "Owen Cannon" <owencannon@mac.com>
Re: Swedes and English
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Swedes and English
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Swedes and English
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
RE: Saint Thomas' Chamade
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Mahler 2/Carnegie+Verizon Halls
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
OHS North Carolina, 2001 - Report No. 6
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: en chamade From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 13:21:46 -0500   I just saw it listed on the stoplist on the Church's own web site. I = assume it's up to date. I'm telling you, you know how large that church is? Well, no matter where you sit that stop sounds as if a trumpeter is playing at full force directly into your ears and I'm not exagerating that. One literally had to cover one's ears. That was the en chamade that introduced me to what en chamade trumpet means. After hearing it the first time I described it to my organ teacher and he said that sounds to him like it mignt be a trompette en chamade and he proceded to describe what an en chamade trumpet is. When I returned to the church, I looked for it and = there is was, he was right. It actually sounded as if it was amplified artificially, but it wasn't. I do, now that I think of it, remember = reading an unfavorable criticism of it back then but do not remember where, = possibly in *Diapason* which was then the title of the AGO magazine.   -----Original Message----- From: Storandt, Peter [mailto:pstorandt@okcu.edu] Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 1:07 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: en chamade     In dozens of services and recitals I have attended at that church, I have never heard this stop used. Is it still there?   -----Original Message----- From: COLASACCO, ROBERT [mailto:RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org] Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 12:05 PM To: 'pipechat@pipechat.org' Subject: en chamade     Just a day or so ago a bit on the over loud trompette en chamades that = have often "filled" our ears was being tossed about. I just came from St. Thomas's web site (5th ave 53rd st NYC) and remembered back in the 1960s when I last heard that organ and just before around the time of Gil Adams touch, the trompette en chamade there was soooooooooooooo loud and horrid, = I have to say, it really was horrid. Does anyone here know if it's still horrid and freightening? It was almost comical, no it was comical to watch people's faces when anyone used the stop. I can say, fortunately, that = only twice was it used when I attended any concerts, and Germani did not use = it in his complete Bach recitals, thanks be to any and all superior beings in the area.   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: en chamade From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 13:24:51 -0500   There is a trompette en chamade at the west end. I think it dates from = the 1980s. It is at least fairly big, but I'd call its tone rather tame. (I usually sit near the front. It probably sounds more brilliant farther back.)   I never heard about this pre-Adams Trompette en Chamade. Was it in front = or back? There might be one in front (behind the casework and not visible); the other reeds are so blazingly French that it would blend right in.   How much has this organ changed during Gerre Hancock's tenure? It still sounds to me like the sound that Adams got, or at least idealized. I = would think that Dr. Hancock would have the authority and the funds to make just about any changes he wanted, so must assume that he likes it as it is (although a former chorister once said otherwise, that it is "an albatross around his neck.")    
(back) Subject: RE: en chamade From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 13:40:46 -0500   No this was in the early/mid 1960s. It was in the back. Gerre was not the organist William Self was the organist at that time.   -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul [mailto:pemmons@wcupa.edu] Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 1:25 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: en chamade     There is a trompette en chamade at the west end. I think it dates from = the 1980s. It is at least fairly big, but I'd call its tone rather tame. (I usually sit near the front. It probably sounds more brilliant farther back.)  
(back) Subject: Wanted-Jonas Nordwall E-mail address. (cross-posted) From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 14:44:55 -0500   Does anyone have the E-mail address for Jonas Nordwall? If you do please reply privately to kevans1@rochester.rr.com .   Thank you, Ken Evans, RTOS Director    
(back) Subject: Re: Saint Thomas' Chamade From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 15:25:46 EST   I believe it is still there, it was the last time I played the organ.   The AEolian-Skinner horizontal trumpet was revoiced, and I believe the = bottom half-octave knuckled (!) when the Adams instrument went in. At some point = in the history of the reed, which may have been voiced by the great Oscar Pearson, it was revoiced because its pressure had been dropped by 50%. Whatever the beast is NOW, it is not as it was originally.   SMG  
(back) Subject: RE: Saint Thomas' Chamade From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 15:36:33 -0500   Well, whatever version it was when I was ther it was so bad that I used to fear hearing it after the second time. I always looked first at the = program when I got to the church to see if there was any chance of there being a piece in which it could be used. It was that scarry, at least to me it = was. As I say, it's still listed in the stoplist on the church's web site, = which I assume is frequently updated.   -----Original Message----- From: TubaMagna@aol.com [mailto:TubaMagna@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 3:26 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Saint Thomas' Chamade     I believe it is still there, it was the last time I played the organ.   The AEolian-Skinner horizontal trumpet was revoiced, and I believe the bottom half-octave knuckled (!) when the Adams instrument went in. At some point in the history of the reed, which may have been voiced by the great Oscar Pearson, it was revoiced because its pressure had been dropped by 50%. Whatever the beast is NOW, it is not as it was originally.   SMG   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Swedes and English From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 17:04:17 -0500   -----Original Message----- From: Noel Stoutenburg [mailto:mjolnir@ticnet.com]=20 Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 5:08 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Lingua Latin   I understand that the Church of England and Church of Sweden considered themselves to be in "full communion" from their respective beginnings until sometime in the 1920's, when the Swedish Church began admitting women to the priesthood, and that though "full communion" was severed then by Canterbury, the validity of Apostolic Succession in the C of S was not challenged.     Noel, I think you've got that backwards. I'm drawing a blank on the name of the Swedish primate in the 1920s who engineered (then) full communion between Sweden and England, and THAT lasted until the late nineteenFORTIES, when the Swedish Church began to ordain women. (Unilateral decisions like that are often a danger to ecumenism.)   Alan  
(back) Subject: RE: *WAY* OFF-TOPIC: Leo XIII and the validity of AnglicanOrders,etc. From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 17:08:22 -0500   -----Original Message----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards [mailto:TheShieling@xtra.co.nz]=20 Subject: Re: *WAY* OFF-TOPIC: Leo XIII and the validity of AnglicanOrders,etc.=20   the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Rome is St Paul's, and St Peter's is a much-later parish church only. St Paul Lateran is called that because it is on the walls of the city: in other words, it was sited there to make it easy for Christians to escape into the country if there was persecution from within Rome, and into the city if there was an attack from beyond the city walls.   .... Alan wonders: Is that the same as St. JOHN Lateran? Any record of JOHN visiting Rome?   Alan  
(back) Subject: RE: correction from me From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 17:10:31 -0500   -----Original Message----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards [mailto:TheShieling@xtra.co.nz]=20 Subject: correction from me   I must immediately correct an idiotic blunder I've just made. St John's in Rome is of course St John Lateran. But the Cathedral is still St Paul's, though not "Lateran".     OH. OK. But I thought that St. John Lateran IS the cathedral of the Diocese of Rome? Where JP keeps his chair?   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Wanted-Jonas Nordwall E-mail address. (cross-posted) From: "Owen Cannon" <owencannon@mac.com> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 15:18:45 -0800   jgnordwall@aol.com   -- owencannon@mac.com   On Thursday, February 7, 2002, at 11:44 AM, Ken Evans wrote:   > Does anyone have the E-mail address for Jonas Nordwall? If you do > please > reply privately to kevans1@rochester.rr.com . > > Thank you, Ken Evans, RTOS Director > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Swedes and English From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 18:41:42 -0600       Alan Freed wrote:   > Noel, I think you've got that backwards. I'm drawing a blank on the > name of the Swedish primate in the 1920s who engineered (then) full > communion between Sweden and England, and THAT lasted until the late > nineteenFORTIES, when the Swedish Church began to ordain women. > (Unilateral decisions like that are often a danger to ecumenism.)   I found out after sending the post that it was in the 1940's, that the Swedes began ordaining women; I was reasonably sure that was the event, = and thought it was earlier than it was. Full communion had existed before the 1920's though, and while I was under the impression that it was unbroken until the OW, I may be wrong on that.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Swedes and English From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 19:57:09 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 4:04 PM Subject: Swedes and English     <<I'm drawing a blank on the name of the Swedish primate in the 1920s who engineered (then) full communion between Sweden and England>>   I think you may mean Archbishop Soderblom, who was Archbishop of Upsala = and head of the Swedish Lutheran Church in the 1920's.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Swedes and English From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 20:17:32 -0600   Folks   As much as some of this discussion has been interesting we are getting WAY OFF TOPIC!! This is not a theological forum but an organ forum - can we wrap up this discussion and get back to PipeChatting??   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Saint Thomas' Chamade From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 19:30:26 -0800 (PST)   Of course recordings rarely give an accurate reproduction of the sound the = way you hear it in person. I have the recent Christmas recording of improvisations using both = the monster organ in front as well as the Taylor & Boody. Both organs are quite nice and with = the Skinner's big French reeds I guess it can get a little pushy, but I still think it sounds far, = far, better than the CD remake of a Dupre recording done not long after the first rebuild. I found = the GDH sounds as recorded to be, frankly, ugly.   However, they are only recordings. one using old technology and recording = styles so who knows? I can't imagine either of the instruments at St. Thomas to be in bad taste, = which of course, is quite out of keeping for any Episcopal Church (!)       =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry, Director of Music Ministry & Organist Mona Dena, Assistant & Principal Conductor The Episcopal Church of St. Peter 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Send FREE Valentine eCards with Yahoo! Greetings! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Mahler 2/Carnegie+Verizon Halls From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 00:11:49 EST     --part1_72.174f64c3.2994b815_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hey All, Westminster Symphonic Choir, of 180 voices, just finished singing two of four concerts of the Mahler 2nd Symphonie. We joined the Amsterdam Royal Concertgebow to perform the piece last night at Carnegie Hall, this evening at the new Kimmel Center in Philly, Saturday at the Kennedy Center (with a real organ), and Sunday at the NJ PAC. NOW...all of the halls are wonderful rooms. We had an incredible = crowd last night, so well mannered, four standing ovations, very warm and appreciative, and tonight was very similar...except for one cell phone and = a lot of coughing. At any rate, both nights also featured Rodgers Organs. Although I feel that Rodgers is the best electronic for such an occasion, reliable, great bass, etc., having the real deal would have made life even =   better. Tomorow night will feature the Aeolian Skinner at the Kennedy = Center. The Dobson should be great when completed as well. Despite electronics, = the piece came off wonderfully, and people greatly enjoyed the music!   -Pete Isherwood   --part1_72.174f64c3.2994b815_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hey All, <BR> = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Wes= tminster Symphonic Choir, of 180 voices, just finished singing two of four = concerts of the Mahler 2nd Symphonie. We joined the Amsterdam Royal = Concertgebow to perform the piece last night at Carnegie Hall, this = evening at the new Kimmel Center in Philly, Saturday at the Kennedy Center = (with a real organ), and Sunday at the NJ PAC. <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;NOW...all of the halls are = wonderful rooms. We had an incredible crowd last night, so well mannered, = four standing ovations, very warm and appreciative, and tonight was very = similar...except for one cell phone and a lot of coughing. At any rate, = both nights also featured Rodgers Organs. Although I feel that Rodgers is = the best electronic for such an occasion, reliable, great bass, etc., = having the real deal would have made life even better. Tomorow night will = feature the Aeolian Skinner at the Kennedy Center. The Dobson should be = great when completed as well. Despite electronics, the piece came off = wonderfully, and people greatly enjoyed the music! <BR> <BR>-Pete Isherwood</FONT></HTML>   --part1_72.174f64c3.2994b815_boundary--  
(back) Subject: OHS North Carolina, 2001 - Report No. 6 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 02:45:56 -0500   OHS 2001 Convention - Report No. 6, Tuesday, June 26.   Dear Lists and Friends,   We hear lots about Messrs. Hook & Hastings and Johnson, but not quite so much about George Jardine & Son of New York. In Stamford, Connecticut, my home until recently, there is a stunning little Jardine mechanical instrument which I happened upon at a special Thanksgiving Day service several years ago. This church is closed, but I got asked to play on that occasion, and was profoundly impressed by this instrument. I am sorry I do not have the stoplist or other details of its history, even its year of birth, but it is a little musical wonder, and I would love to see it = somehow brought to public attention. I have been pondering that. Access at the moment is difficult, if not impossible. Another Jardine that made a great impression on me, only through the medium of a black and white photo in Joseph Blanton's "The Organ in Church Design," was that of St. George's, Stuyvesant Square in Manhattan. What a visual conception. Is there anyone living today who heard that organ live? Please speak up! Anyway, seeing = that picture and hearing the little one at St. Luke's, Stamford, I began to = think that perhaps Jardine was the Walter Holtkamp of his day, if only in the = most superficial way. Interesting tonally, with some rather striking visual designs in the later years. Peter Cameron has had a long career in organ maintenance, repair, and restoration, and from 1977 to 1994, served as Maintenance Coordinator for the Andover Organ Company. His lecture, = entitled "George Jardine and Son, New York Organbuilders - an Era of Spectacular Organs" was a wonderful appreciation of a once great company, from one who has had extensive hands on personal experience with their output. A great story, well told.   After the lecture, we did our three-way split to accommodate one very = small but beautiful venue in Historic Bethabara (accent on the second syllable) within Winston-Salem, the "Saal" of the 1771 "Gemeinhaus," the meeting = room in which services were held in the Congregation House. While one part of = the group was hearing the recital, the other two parts were visiting the historical exhibits and enjoying the beautiful grounds. The little three-stop, single manual organ in the "Saal" is by Charles McManis, built in 1971 after a 1772 organ by North Carolina builder, Joseph Bultischek, = an instrument that perished in a fire in 1942. Sadly and strangely, no one knows what the specification of that organ was, so Charles McManis, fortified with some knowledge of other very small organs used by the Moravians, settled on an 8' Gedact, 4' Principal, and 2' Octave. The instrument is in a balcony overlooking where we were seated. It speaks to = us and away from the player.   Michael Rowland is Director of Music at Ardmore United Methodist Church, = and staff accompanist at Salem College. He gave us a program of pieces of the 18th century, beginning with Four Preludes of the English Moravian, Christian Latrobe (1758-1836), followed by three Bach chorale preludes: Erbarm' dich mein (BWV 721), the chordal (and only) setting, which was a = bit of a giggle with the pronounced chiff of the 8' Gedact; Gelobet seist du (BWV 697), the short, four-part manualiter setting; and Allein Gott (BWV 717), a delightfully intricate and long work in the rhythm of a gigue. O happy day, we then sang Allein Gott, two stanzas with harmony provided, sheer joy in that lovely place. Mr. Rowland was then joined by Lauren Kossler, a fine violinist, and together they gave us a suite for violin = and keyboard by my beloved John Stanley, three movements: Adagio, Allegro and Allegro - sheer bliss it was. Thanks to them both for a perfect program = for a most attractive and historic place.   Dr. Andrew Unsworth became known to OHS convention goers at the Boston convention of 2000, at which he gave a most interesting lecture on some history of organ pedagogy in Boston. This year, he came to us a = recitalist, playing on an 18 stop Hook and Hastings instrument of 1924, with no stop over 4' in a quite dead acoustic. Both Andrew and the organ conquered all, aided no doubt, at times by the 73 note chests and attendant super = coupler. It all began with two pieces by Henry Dunham (1853-1929), who taught organ at New England Conservatory for 52 years! From the First Sonata in G = Minor, Opus 10 (from 1882), an Allegro moderato, followed by Impromptu, from a = set of 12 pieces of 1912, Opus 24. The sonata movement is really sturdy stuff, if a bit dated, and very sturdily played. The Impromptu is a charming = piece of parlor music, charmingly played. Next, "Vision," Joseph Rheinberger, a lovely piece requiring some dexterity at registration changes, which were very deftly handled. The last of the organ pieces was the War March of the Priests, of Mendelssohn, played with great flair and a fat and powerful registration - very satisfying indeed. Andrew proved himself to also be a very fine hymn player, giving really good support, and doing clever bits = of descanting, with a rather nice reharmonization of the last verse. There = were six stanzas, for which we had the harmony, and we were not bored. Oh, the hymn was Redeemer of Israel, to a tune by Freeman Lewis that I did not = know. Andrew is presently Organist and Choirmaster at St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Durham. He has a PhD in Performance Practice from Duke, in addition to other degrees and honors. I hope we get to hear him again = in future conventions.   Lunch was at 1:15 at Centenary United Methodist Church, Winston-Salem, following which we bused to Old Salem where we again broke into three = groups in order to accommodate the limited capacity of the "Saal" in the Single Brothers' House. While one group was at the recital, others were touring = Old Salem. Writing this in the winter, it is hard to think of our mad search = for the ice cream store, on what was quite a hot day. In the "Saal," Lois Regestein played her excellent recital three times in order to fit = everyone in. She has played in almost all of the OHS conventions I have attended, = and always manages to come up with an interesting program, and to play it = well. The Organ, by David Tannenberg, 1798, is gentle and sweet. There are five stops. The console is slightly detached and reversed. The instrument was rebuilt by Charles McManis in the mid-60s. Lois began with Organ = Obbligatos to an Anthem, by Johann Ludwig Freydt (1748-1807), there apparently having been a tradition of using these as solo organ works complete in = themselves. We heard three, Vivace, Adagio, and Vivace. They were rather like those pieces in the Schirmer Sonatina Album most of us played from, the works of Kuhlau, Clementi and others of the period, not a bad thing. Next, Fuga, by Johann Gottfried Gebhard (1755-?), a pleasant and workmanlike piece by a German Moravian whose works were apparently known to American Moravians. = We had earlier heard four Preludes for Organ by Christian Latrobe, played by Michael Rowland. Lois happily gave us two more, No. 2 in C Minor and = Number 6 in E Flat Major. It is thought that these are not organ works, but have been transcribed for the instrument. They are published in North Carolina = by Brodt Music, and are worth having. We then heard a Chorale Prelude on Nun ruhen alle Walder (the tune we know as Innsbruck) by Ernst Immanuel Erbe (1854-1927), who emigrated to America and settled in St. Louis, and then another "Chorale Verse" based on the same tune, by one of the many late 18th, early 19th century Van Vlecks, in this case the composer is thought = to have been Carl Anton Van Vleck. By John Stanley, we heard from Book III, Voluntary No. IX in G Major, Opus 7, and then we sang! The hymn was a most interesting Moravian one called Morning Star, written in 1836 by Francis Florentine Hagen (1815-1870). It is in soloist and response form, with the responses sung by us all in harmony. Anne Kazlauskas was the excellent soprano soloist. Four stanzas and we enjoyed them all. Thus ended a most interesting program. James Boehringer, former Director of the Moravian Music Foundation and Kevin Brown, present Administrator of the Foundation were both acknowledged as having provided help in organizing the program. Lois has degrees from Oberlin and Yale. In the Oberlin days, before her = marriage, her last name began with a W as does mine. We had classes together quite a bit, at a time when attendance was always taken in each class. We two Ws always had the last word.   We next walked to Home Moravian Church, where Paula Locklair presented a most interesting slide-talk about the work of David Tannenberg, and his relationship with the Moravians in North Carolina. Mrs. Locklair has = worked with the various collections at Old Salem since 1975, and has been = Director of Collections since 1987. She has a BA in Art History from Hollins = College and an MA, also in Art History, from Oberlin. And yes, since you ask, she = is married to the composer, Dan Locklair.   We then moved upstairs to the church, where the excellent Piedmont Chamber Singers, directed by James Allbritten, and on this occasion, accompanied = by David Pulliam, led us in a Singstunde, which is just what it sounds like. = A wonderful hour of singing, much of it done by us, with some choral works sung by the Chamber Singers. What we sang were hymns that would be known = to a Moravian congregation, but not necessarily to us. We learned some new = and quite interesting hymns.   OHS planners always try to find occasional experiences for us other than Organs and Organ music, and tonight was the night. We bused quite a long = way out of town to the Pollirosa Restaurant, obviously a very popular spot. There was a long line and the place was really packed, but they were ready for our group, and we had some wonderful barbecue and lots of other good things, all accompanied by Blue Grass Music, live, on stage. There were = also Hayrides available, but I did not notice any of our group indulging. We = had six buses, and they left for the hotel at intervals, so you could leave = when you had had your fill of food - and possibly of Blue Grass. A lot of our gang really got into it, singing and dancing up a storm, and me without my camera!   As always, there was a congenial regrouping at the Exhibits and Cash Bar, which we reached a bit earlier than usual, not a bad thing with an 8:30 = a.m. bus departure in the morning, and a two hour ride to begin with, leading = to a most extraordinary musical day.   Comments, additions, corrections? Please send to me at the above address. These reports will appear in print in The Diapason, and the benefit of the insight of any readers here would be helpful.   Cheers and Thanks,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com