PipeChat Digest #2697 - Friday, February 8, 2002
 
RE: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Chicago International Organ Festival UPDATE: Carol Williams
  by "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org>
Re: Corrected Version
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Saint Thomas' Chamade
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Critiquing Ourselves As Artists
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
RE: Critiquing Ourselves As Artists
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Polish Classical (?) setting of Compline (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: Swedes and English
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Quinquagesima ("Tinkling Cymbal Sunday") (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Ash Wednesday (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS
  by "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net>
CONTACT INFO FOR DENNIS WOLKOWICZ/COPERNICUS CENTER
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:53:04 -0500   Two cents:   I don't see any reason why any organist should at any recital, or concert = if you prefer, should do more than come out, bow, smile, maybe give an arm = wave of sorts and sit down and play. Finish, get up, bow, smile give an arm = wave or sorts and flee. And if s/he wants afterwards greet folks in the/a hall. Last Jesse Norman concert I was at, she didn't come out and speak to = anyone? Last Margaret Price concert I attended, she didn't come and chat with us = and I wasn't familiar with all the songs! I didn't feel the need to have her = go over them with me. Last chamber music recital I attended not one of the quartet said a word to us. Why must organists?   Robert Colasacco   -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul [mailto:pemmons@wcupa.edu] Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 10:38 AM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS     Among good thoughts from Neil Brown:   >Repertoire: Good artists know to mix a little new with the "war horses". And there is a very real psychological aspect to planning good programs. = It was a great pianist (and his name escapes me just now) who said, "Always leave the audience wanting more."   At the San Francisco AGO convention (early 80s) John Fenstermaker's = session about program planning compared a good program to a good menu. He added that restaurants are so-called because they are supposed to *restore* = one's feeling of well-being all-around. This mission requires attention to more than the food.   >Talking to audience: Some persons are better at this than others. When Felix Hell came to our church, he didn't say a word. But he connected = with the audience through his demeanor, his graciousness, and of course, his playing. I personally like to add a good dose of humor to my organ concerts, so that the listener will feel comfortable with what he/she = hears. But that is me.   I think that talking to the audience is particularly commendable in dedicatory recitals of church organs, where a lot of people in the = audience have probably never gone to an organ recital before, and they are there primarily to hear (and hopefully to learn something about) what they have just purchased at such great cost.   On the other hand, we do seem to have a problem of standing among our = fellow musicians sometimes, and this can have repercussions just as serious as being ignored by the public (e.g., shall a proper organ be installed in a concert hall, or a first-rate organ department be maintained in a school = of music?) If it is not routine for pianists, conductors, or singers to intersperse their performances with chat, why should we feel obliged to = make a habit of it? (Bearing in mind that outside of New York and academia, there are few art singers, pianists, or violinists-- let alone other instrumentalists-- giving solo recitals anymore. We are carrying this = torch almost alone now, perhaps.) I'm not at all opposed to either hearing or giving lecture/demonstrations, but surely there are occasions at which = they would be out of place as well as other times when they are great.   Good showmanship suggests that neither the recitalist nor anyone else = should speak before the instrument does. Don't oral preliminaries, especially casual remarks by third parties, only intrude upon, and detract from, the event that we have gathered for?   If there are no oral explanations, however, how about printed program = notes? Perhaps I go overboard with mine-- but after my performance on Jan. 28, Malcolm Wechsler showed me the program of the recital he had attended the previous evening at Yale. The notes were just as extensive, and he said that such were required of student recitalists. Good idea, I think.     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Chicago International Organ Festival UPDATE: Carol Williams From: "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:24:55 -0600   Chicago International Organ Festival Day 2 Carol Williams Monday, February 18, 2002 7:30 p.m. The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago 126 East Chestnut Street, Chicago, IL 60611-2094 Contact: C. Carroll Cole 312.787.2729, ext. 252   PROGRAM TOCCATA ON "VENI EMMANUEL" Andrew Carter   JUPITER THEME FROM "THE PLANETS SUITE" Gustav Holst (transcribed by E. H. Thiman)   WAR MARCH OF PRIESTS Felix Mendelssohn (transcribed by W. T. Best)   SERENADE Charles-Marie Widor (transcribed by W. J. Westbrook)   PRELUDE IN C-sharp MINOR, Op. 3, No. 2 Sergy Rachmaninoff (transcribed by F. G. Shinn)   FINLANDIA, OP. 26, NO. 7 Jean Sibelius (transcribed by H. A. Fricker)   CROWN IMPERIAL Sir William Walton (transcribed by Herbert Murrill)   BALLET Claude Debussy (transcribed by Leon Roques)   LA CATHEDRALE ENGLOUTIE Claude Debussy (transcribed by Leon Roques)   EN BATEAU Claude Debussy (transcribed by Leon Roques)   MARCHE MILITAIRE Franz Schubert (transcribed by Carol Williams)   MAPLE LEAF RAG Scott Joplin (transcribed by Carol Williams)   THE WASHINGTON POST John Philip Sousa (transcribed by Carol Williams)   About the Artist Carol Williams spent five years at the Royal Academy of Music where she specialized in organ performing as a student of David Sanger and obtained the Academy's prestigious Recital Diploma together with an LRAM (organ) = and an LRAM (piano). She was awarded all the major prizes for organ performing and, during her studies, she became a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists and a Fellow of Trinity College London plus an Associate of the Royal College of Music. Carol has also visited Paris for study with Daniel Roth, the Organist at = the Church of St. Sulpice where the famous Charles-Marie Widor was organist = for sixty-three years. Moving to the USA, Carol undertook postgraduate study = at Yale University under the direction of Professor Thomas Murray where she = was appointed University Chapel Organist and was awarded an Artist Diploma together with the Charles Ives prize for outstanding achievement. Then to New York where she became the Associate Organist at the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Long Island's Garden City and undertook Doctoral study = under Professor McNeil Robinson at the Manhattan School of Music where she received the Helen Cohn award for her D.M.A. degree. In October 2001, Carol was appointed San Diego Civic Organist and Artistic Director of the Spreckels Organ Society and she now devotes all her time = to concerts. Other venues at which Carol has performed include: St. Sulpice, Paris; Westminster Abbey; St. Paul's Cathedral; King's College, Cambridge; Queen's College, Oxford; Blenheim Palace; Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark; Woolsey Hall, Yale University; Memorial Chapel, Harvard University; St. Patrick's, New York; Washington National Cathedral; St. Ignatius Loyola, = New York; Riverside Church, New York. She has also given concerts in Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Holland, Germany and Singapore. En route, Carol has been elected an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music (ARAM) in recognition = of her contribution to music. A regular broadcaster in the UK and in America, she has been the guest performer with a number of leading orchestras including the BBC Concert Orchestra and, more recently, with the Beijing Symphony Orchestra when she performed the inaugural recitals on a newly-installed Austin organ in Beijing's Forbidden City Concert Hall. = Carol has been interviewed "live" on many radio programs, in which she has highlighted her profound love of the King of Instruments, and she is featured in the national-awareness video "Pulling out all the Stops" when she was filmed in concert at St. Thomas' Church in New York's Fifth = Avenue. She was also privileged to take part in the Virgil Fox Memorial Concert = held in the fall of 2000 at New York's Riverside Church and a recording of the memorable event has been released as a double-CD by Gothic Records.     C. Carroll Cole, Coordinator of Fine Arts Fourth Presbyterian Church 126 East Chestnut Street, Chicago, IL 60611-2094 312.787.2729, ext. 252 facsimile 312.787.4584 ccole@fourthchurch.org <http://www.fourthchurch.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: Corrected Version From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:31:46 -0600   Douglas: A "recital" is a "concert" given by an INDIVIDUAL musician. I cannot believe that one has to rant and rave over perfectly fine word usage. If you have never been aware, for example, of all the world's great pianists giving solo recitals, I suggest you look again. If you don't = think Yo-Yo Ma gives recitals, I suggest you do a "Yo-Yo Ma recital" search on Google.   RJL     From: Douglas A Campbell <dougcampbell@juno.com> on 02/08/2002 08:28 AM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd To: pipechat@pipechat.org@SMTP@cchntmsd cc:   Subject: Corrected Version     First, the NAME- Why do we HAVE "Organ Recitals" ????????? No other musician (outside of academia) gives "recitals" - they have CONCERTS ! I think that psychologically, the general public is turned off by the very word. Doesn't it bring up connotations of that dreadful dance "recital" that you HAD to go to because your neighbors 10 year old daughter was going to demonstrate that she had no business even thinking of ballet ???? When was the last time you went to a Yo Yo Ma "recital"?    
(back) Subject: Re: Saint Thomas' Chamade From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 12:35:06 EST   I had always understood that the Trompette en Chamade at St. Thomas was a revoiced Tuba and, the times I have played it in recital, have found it = quite beautiful and full bodied. It is not at all thin in texture or abrasive.   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Critiquing Ourselves As Artists From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 12:41:06 EST   Robert Colasocco writes:   >Last chamber music recital I attended not one of the >quartet said a word to us. Why must organists? <<   They don't, Robert, but if they choose to do so, why not? After all, it = is THEIR recital/concert, as such, this should be allowed even as they are allowed the freedom to choose their own musical program. If the artist = deems it out of character, they should refrain. Many do. If they feel it important and they are comfortable with it (and they truly have something meaningful to say), go for it.   I think the organ holds much more mystique than any other instrument. One =   does not have be play piano, violin, trumpet, et al, to have a concept of what that instrument is, how it is played, etc. Further, the entire instrument is seen. This is often not the case with organs which dimensionally are huge in comparison to all other instruments, are = imatative in nature, and require all four appendages to be played and manipulated. This is facinating to a large number of attendees who probably are not organists but merely appreciate the performance and its content. As long as the comments are focused on the organ and its music, one would = be hard pressed to find a congenial artist's remarks offensive.   My opinion, obviously. Others will hold differing views but should this = not be the perrogative of the artist; to speak or not to speak?   Best wishes, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: RE: Critiquing Ourselves As Artists From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 12:58:45 -0500   I did not say that one should or should not talk to the audience. I was = just replying to something said previously where organ "recitals" were being compared to other musical events, i.e., concerts, recitals, performances = and among the list of things suggested that an organist might do, including wearing a colorful bow tie so as not the look like Digger O'Dell, s/he = might communicate verbally with the listeners. I was just stating that I have never been at a recital of any other musical event were the artist = conversed with the audience so why must the organist! I may not have remembered = fully the message but my point is if the organ recital and the organist were = being compared to the other musician and the other musicians performance venue, why should that particular venue, i.e., verbal communication, be different for the organist? I too think it should be left to the organist or any performer for that matter. As a listener, I'd rather not hear it but would sit through it were it offered. On the other hand if I were going to a = hall knowing full well that I was attending a lecture/recital then I'd be fully prepared for it. I think a musical offering should be just that, a musical offering. It is just a matter of opinion, as you say. Robert     -----Original Message----- From: Wurlibird1@aol.com [mailto:Wurlibird1@aol.com] Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 12:41 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Critiquing Ourselves As Artists     Robert Colasocco writes:   >Last chamber music recital I attended not one of the >quartet said a word to us. Why must organists? <<   They don't, Robert, but if they choose to do so, why not? After all, it = is THEIR recital/concert, as such, this should be allowed even as they are allowed the freedom to choose their own musical program. If the artist deems it out of character, they should refrain. Many do. If they feel it important and they are comfortable with it (and they truly have something meaningful to say), go for it.   I think the organ holds much more mystique than any other instrument. One =   does not have be play piano, violin, trumpet, et al, to have a concept of what that instrument is, how it is played, etc. Further, the entire instrument is seen. This is often not the case with organs which dimensionally are huge in comparison to all other instruments, are = imatative   in nature, and require all four appendages to be played and manipulated. This is facinating to a large number of attendees who probably are not organists but merely appreciate the performance and its content. As long as the comments are focused on the organ and its music, one would = be   hard pressed to find a congenial artist's remarks offensive.   My opinion, obviously. Others will hold differing views but should this = not   be the perrogative of the artist; to speak or not to speak?   Best wishes, Jim Pitts   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Polish Classical (?) setting of Compline (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 10:07:04 -0800   OK, I'm on one of my periodic quests for something obscure (grin).   I had an LP of a setting of Compline in Latin for SATB choir and string (?) orchestra by a Polish composer. Unsurprisingly, I can't remember the composer's name, and the LP is long-gone. But it was a fun piece, and I'd like to find it.   Anybody have a clue?   Cheers,   Bud Clark St. Matthew's ACC Newport Beach CA USA    
(back) Subject: RE: Swedes and English From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 14:54:37 -0500   Of course, John. Thank you. I OFTEN draw a blank on that name. Now that you've supplied his familyname, I can say "Nathan" for his Christian name.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller [mailto:jlspeller@mindspring.com]=20 Subject: Re: Swedes and English   I think you may mean Archbishop Soderblom, who was Archbishop of Upsala and head of the Swedish Lutheran Church in the 1920's.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 09:44:25 +1300   Thank you very much indeed. Even for those who are self-confessed organ experts and organ music experts, your words should be listened to. I = believe everything you say is absolutely, always, right. (No, I'm not being ironic or cynical, I mean this). Ross -----Original Message----- From: Douglas A Campbell <dougcampbell@juno.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, February 09, 2002 2:29 AM Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS     > >I have a different take on this whole topic and hope that you will >indulge me. > >I am not an organist, I am not an organ builder. Like Mike Gettleman, I'm >just a "fan". I did major in music in college and am a "sort of" >musician, but here is what I see, hear and feel at an organ performance. > >First, the NAME- > Why do we HAVE "Organ Recitals" ????????? No other musician (outside of >academia) gives "recitals" - they have CONCERTS ! >I think that psychologically, the general public is turned off by the >very word. Doesn't it bring up connotations of that dreadful dance >"recital" that you HAD to go to because your neighbors 10 year old >daughter was going to demonstrate that she had no business even thinking >of ballet ???? When was the last time you went to a Yom Ma "recital" ? > >VISUALS: >I have a background in theatre, so, to me, the visual aspect of a concert >IS important. I am disappointed when the organist is hidden (such as . >St. Thomas, NYC). This does not negate the value of the concert, but it >does alter my level of enjoyment. As an audience member, I want to >connect with the performer and that means being able to see them ! I >once went to a rather fantastic program which featured Arthur Poster, >Will O. Head lee, Donald Superman and Leonard Raver. For some strange >reason they had moved a portative ins. in front of the console of the >Holt at Carouse College ( Syracuse University), specifically to "screen >the performers from the audience". I found this to be most disconcerting. >Can you imagine going to a concert to hear Islam Pearl man play from >behind a screen ?? > >I feel that organists too often try to dress like they are already >deceased. Although I believe in decorum, and I think a Tux is fully >appropriate, it seems to me that too often they really try to dress more >like the local funeral director than a concert artist. Last year, I went >to an organ "affair" with a friend that is a consummate musician ( but >not an organist). We met the artist before the event and my friend >remarked on the fact that he was wearing a burgundy bow tied with/ a >black Tux. She felt that this was a wonderful "touch" that added a great >deal to the visual image of the artist. > >COMMUNICATION >Of all the organ "events" I have attended, the most memorable are the >ones where the performer spoke to the audience. It doesn't have to be >much, but some direct contact with the audience makes the artist much >more "human" and not an organ playing automaton. Now, if you are only >playing for other highly competent organists there is no reason to >"explain a piece" or point out things to listen for, or give any >background on the composer. However, if the goal is to reach out to the >masses - then these things should be part of a performance. One of the >things that got me interested in classic music when I was a child was the >Leonard Bern stein "Young People's Guide to the Orchestra" series of TV >shows. A few chosen words can go a very long way to achieve a connection >between the audience and the artist. The very best communication has been >from organists that recognized that they were performing DURING their >talk as well as during their playing. While a monotone, deadpan speech is >better than none at all - a vibrant, energetic talk is far superior. If >you listen to any of the Virgil Fox later recordings ( Heavy Organ, >Winter land, Entertainer) you can easily hear the level of energy that he >put into the spoken part of the program. > >REPERTOIRE >This becomes the touchiest of the subjects. I can't tell you how many >times I've heard on the various lists that "I can't stand to hear that >old war horse one more time". Yet, it is these "war horses" that the >general public really want to hear ! Why ? because they know the music >- they have heard it before and can understand what the performer is >doing. If you only play "unfamiliar music" then the audience has no basis >to compare that performance. As I said before, I am not an organist and >really am not sufficiently knowledgeable to discern all the intricacies >of a given performance. In the past year I have heard two young >organists, both very competent, both of the same age group, both playing >music that would be considered high caliper. I could not tell you which >one is "better". I know that I liked both performances, but since they >played different pieces - I don't have much to compare. I am not good >enough to discern all the nuances that I'm sure most of you organists do >almost automatically. I find it especially confusing when a well known >organists describes another as "musically sensitive and expressive" and >another wells organists describes the same performer as "automatic and >lacking in passion". > >A number of years ago I went to a "recital" where the organist played the >Toccata & Fugue in D (yes, that one). He is a well known local organist >who is highly regarded. I felt that the performance, while technically >very good, was totally lacking in "life". If he had played a piece that I >was not familiar with, I would have had no basis for comparison. > >When a "RECITAL" starts with two or three Bach Chorale Preludes based on >chorales I'm not familiar with ( and that's a lot!) they have lost me >already. How about a brief (either verbal or program note) telling us >what the Chorale is from, and a play through to the Choral itself ? Is >that too much to ask ? > >Symphony Orchestras always have a difficult time programming works, most >often because they realize the need for "familiar" music and have to >balance that with the more interesting (to them) music that the public is >not generally familiar. I think organ CONCERTS should also acknowledge >that the public is not familiar with all the repertoire and program >accordingly. > >If the object is to make the pipe organ a popular form of enjoyment and >entertainment, then a certain amount of "playing to the masses" and >"Educating the masses" is in order. > > > >Douglas A. Campbell >Skaneateles, NY > >________________________________________________________________ >GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! >Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! >Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: >http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: RE: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 15:26:54 -0500   I don't know, I think your patronizing us. [just 1/2 kidding] RBC -----Original Message----- From: Ross & Lynda Wards [mailto:TheShieling@xtra.co.nz] Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 3:44 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS     Thank you very much indeed. Even for those who are self-confessed organ experts and organ music experts, your words should be listened to. I = believe everything you say is absolutely, always, right. (No, I'm not being ironic or cynical, I mean this). Ross  
(back) Subject: Quinquagesima ("Tinkling Cymbal Sunday") (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 12:48:21 -0800   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church 330 West Bay Street, Suite 120 (temporary location -- in the Daily Pilot Building) Costa Mesa CA   Sung Mass at 9:00 a.m.   Voluntary - Ubi caritas - Benoit Hymn - Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life - Gardiner Kyrie - Missa Sancta Maria Magdalena - Healy Willan Psalm 121 - Levavi oculos - Dupius in g minor (Anglican Chant) Anthem - If I Have Wounded Any Soul Today - Gabriel (grin) well, it fits the Epistle, sorta (chuckle) Doxology - Old 100th Sursum corda - Gregorian Sanctus & Benedictus - Willan Great Amen - McNeil Robinson in D Agnus Dei - Willan Voluntary - Elevation on Mass VIII - Benoit Anthem - Ubi caritas - Gregorian/Russian/Clark Hymn - Immortal Love, Forever Full - Albino Kneeling Hymn - Day By Day - Sumner Hymn - Love Divine - Hyfrydol Voluntary - Jubilate Deo - Benoit   High Mass at 11:00   Voluntary - Ubi caritas - Benoit Hymn - Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life - Gardiner Introit - Esto mihi - Gregorian, Tone 8 Kyrie - Merbecke Psalm 121 - Levavi oculos - Dupius in g minor (Anglican Chant) Voluntary - Fidelis servus - Benoit Doxology - Old 100th Sursum corda - Gregorian Sanctus & Benedictus - Merbecke Great Amen - McNeil Robinson in D Agnus Dei - Merbecke Communion - Ecce ascendimus Hierosolyma - Healy Willan (text from the Gospel of the Day) Voluntary - Elevation on Mass VIII - Benoit Hymn - Immortal Love, Forever Full - Albino Kneeling Hymn - Day By Day - Sumner Hymn - Love Divine - Hyfrydol Voluntary - Jubilate Deo - Benoit   Cheers,   Bud Clark            
(back) Subject: Ash Wednesday (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 13:00:20 -0800   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church 330 West Bay Street, Suite 120 Costa Mesa, California USA   SOLEMN MASS AT 7 P.M.   Voluntary - Have Mercy Upon Me, O God - Bach Psalm 51 - Miserere mei, Deus - Direct Tone, with fauxbourdons (Clark)   AT THE BLESSING AND IMPOSITION OF ASHES   Antiphon - Exaudi nos - Gregorian, Mode 7 / SATB (Clark) Antiphon - Immutemur habitu - Mode 1 (Clark) Antiphon - Jusxta vestibulum - Mode 4 (Clark) Respond - Emedemus - Mode 2 (Clark)   AT THE MASS   Introit - Misereris omnium - Mode 1 (Clark) Kyrie - Merbecke Gradual - Miserere mei, Deus - Mode 1 (Clark) Tract - Domine, non secundum - Mode 1 (Clark) Anthem - Create In Me A Clean Heart, O God - Mueller For the Doxology - All Things Come of Thee, O Lord - traditional Sursum corda - Gregorian Sanctus & Benedictus - Merbecke Great Amen - McNeil Robinson in d minor Agnus Dei - Merbecke Communion - Qui meditabor - Gregorian, Mode 3 Anthem - O Saviour of the World - John Goss Hymn - With Broken Heart and Contrite Sigh - Babylon's Streams Kneeling Hymn - Day By Day - Sumner Hymn - Forty Days and Forty Nights - Heinlein Voluntary - I Call To Thee, Lord Jesus Christ - Bach   A holy Lent to everyone ...   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: CRITIQUING OURSELVES AS ARTISTS From: "John Cormack" <jcorm@bellatlantic.net> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 17:27:59 -0500   >VISUALS: >I once went to a rather fantastic program which featured Arthur Poster, >Will O. Headlee, Donald Superman and Leonard Raver. For some strange >reason they had moved a portative ins. in front of the console of the >Holt at Carouse College ( Syracuse University), specifically to "screen >the performers from the audience". I found this to be most disconcerting. >Can you imagine going to a concert to hear Islam Pearl man play from >behind a screen ??   I was a student at Syracuse University for 5 years and attended many organ concerts in the Crouse College Auditorium and fortunately never saw this screen you mention. Hopefully it was a one time occurrence. On a side = note, when the University removed the thick draperies between the Hendricks = Chapel Holtkamp organ and the chapel the sound was drastically improved.   -- John Cormack      
(back) Subject: CONTACT INFO FOR DENNIS WOLKOWICZ/COPERNICUS CENTER From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 18:44:29 EST   Hello   I am trying to reach Dennis Wolkowicz, manager at the Copernicus Center (Gateway Theatre) in Chicago. The email address I have doesn't seem to be =   working, and I called the theatre but his name was not on the staff = roster.   Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance. Scott Foppiano