PipeChat Digest #2707 - Friday, February 15, 2002
 
RE: How my Lent really began...
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
Re: How my Lent really began...
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Service music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Service music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: How my Lent really began...
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
RE: How my Lent really began...
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
OFF-TOPIC: is this the Old West, or WHAT?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: is this the Old West, or WHAT?
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Opinions sought
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Opinions sought
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Opinions sought
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT?
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: How my Lent really began...
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Service music
  by "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infi.net>
Re: Opinions sought
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: How my Lent really began...
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: How my Lent really began...
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT?
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Correcting My Old West Story
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: Correcting My Old West Story
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: How my Lent really began... From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 10:22:38 -0500   Malcolm: I'm glad to hear your encouraging words, and want to tell you of a book that came to hand yesterday. Small format, leather bound, BOOK OF WORSHIP; UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST. 1986. Beautifully produced, with rubrics in red. Nearly 600 pages of really solid stuff (with SOME fluff, but not much). Explicit Real Presence, and tons more. Suddenly I feel MUCH more akin to the UCC than I did before.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: Malcolm Wechsler [mailto:manderusa@earthlink.net]=20 Subject: Re: How my Lent really began...   Is there not a senior minister here with a brain and a modicum of taste? Is the make up of the congregation such that they really want this to happen - the death of the use of the organ in worship? Your despair about thinking that "this is where the church is" is, I hope, not entirely accurate for the church at large. The two UMC churches around here that I know pretty well would have a riot on their hands if anyone tried to impose what you describe on them.=20    
(back) Subject: Re: How my Lent really began... From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 10:56:59 -0500   Yes, but . . . how many UCC churches would use such a thing? I remember seeing in a church where I was attending a recital something called the Presbyterian Book of Common Prayer or something very like that. It was basically the Anglican Book of Common Prayer in new clothing, and when I asked about it, I was told that only "high church" Presbyterians would use it. I think the Presbyterians in Scotland are perhaps in that category.   To stay on topic, it was a very good recital! On an awful organ!   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 15, 2002 10:22 AM Subject: RE: How my Lent really began...     Malcolm: I'm glad to hear your encouraging words, and want to tell you of a book that came to hand yesterday. Small format, leather bound, BOOK OF WORSHIP; UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST. 1986. Beautifully produced, with rubrics in red. Nearly 600 pages of really solid stuff (with SOME fluff, but not much). Explicit Real Presence, and tons more. Suddenly I feel MUCH more akin to the UCC than I did before.   Alan          
(back) Subject: RE: Service music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 11:27:10 -0500   Glenda asks:   >wonder what your favorite service music set is to play and/or sing   The Willan is a classic. Melodic, dignified, gracious, wears very well-- what more can you ask for?   If I had my druthers, a unison setting by Nicholas Choveaux which I sang = as a boy would also be in the hymnal. It has the same traits as the Willan, although perhaps not to the same degree. But of course, it uses "rite 1" words.   I find most of the congregational settings of the Rite II texts = disgustingly wooden and condescending-- about as musical as the sound of axes being ground. If I couldn't write any better music than that, I wouldn't call myself a composer (I don't). Perhaps most of the real composers dislike = the new words so much that they simply refuse to set them. But of course = anyone can be an opportunist.   In the late 60s, the choir of Boys Town, Neb. had many mass settings under their belts from all eras-- if a boy should die, they'd sing Faure-- but = of the new texts, only a setting by Hermann Schroeder and one by Anton = Heiller. Msgr. Francis Schmitt, the choirmaster, "wouldn't want to waste my poor kids' time" with anything less. Would that more still had that attitude today.   The Mathias and Rutter settings aren't *too* bad, except that I don't know anyone who feels that the Mathias, at least, wears well enough to be used week after week. It's best for a festive season. I understand that copyright and licensing problems forced the editors of the 1982 hymnal to choose between these settings; there just wasn't the money to include = both.     I kinda like S-129 (Powell) for the sanctus, but done differently from how one usually hears it. Try it slow and grand, with "a lot of organ" for those chords that occur every two beats, and it takes on a whole new character.   Nothing, however, comes up to plainsong. One of my grad school friends, = who grew up near Princeton, Ill. (Virgil Fox's home town), told of the little Episcopal church in the corn fields that he attended as a child. They didn't even have an organ or a regular organist (perhaps they had a harmonium), but the congregation sang several Gregorian settings of the ordinary, rotating them according to the church seasons. You don't have = to be S. Mary the Virgin in NYC to do this. That would be at least half the congregation's mass repertoire in my dreams.                   > -----Original Message----- > From: Glenda [SMTP:gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com] > Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2002 8:49 PM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Service music > > Someone wrote me regarding the Schubert service music, which made me > wonder what your favorite service music set is to play and/or sing. Of > all that I've experienced, I really like the Willan Gloria and Agnus > Dei. > > Just curious. > > Glenda Sutton > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Service music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 11:41:04 -0500   >I'm rather fond of the Langlais Missa in simplicitate, though I don't = care much for the Gloria or Credo. But THAT would set their HAIR on fire (chuckle). Maybe I'll specify it for my FUNERAL (grin).   Oh, yes! I'm more than rather fond of that-- first-rate! but it's = probably be beyond a congregation. It is a unison setting, however (of the Latin), hence doable by a small choir. It should be in every Episcopal and Roman Catholic choir library.   If we're talking about choral settings, too, let me put in a word for = "Mass for a Saint's Day" by Nicholas Jackson (published-- probably with emphasis on the past tense, alas-- by Boosey & Hawkes) His style is very = reminiscent of Langlais, and if that is too far out for your choir they will find it a challenge. If not, it's fairly easy for them, but effective. The hardest part is the organ's. Get your toccata fingers limbered up.   I'm no worse than lukewarm about the Merbecke in the 1940 hymnal, but = can't stand its rhythm in the 1982 hymnal, even if it is more authentic.          
(back) Subject: Re: How my Lent really began... From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 08:49:32 -0800 (PST)   As usualy, in the contemporary vs. traditional discussions, I take issue = with everybody.   Responding to:   Charles Peery "I certainly don't need forty days..."   It is very sad indeed to think that we can have Easter without Lent. This theology seems to indicate that there is only grace, no sin; only = resurrection, no death.   Malcolm Wechsler "Your despair about thinking that 'this is where the church is' is, I = hope, not entirely accurate for the church at large."   "Despair" certainly seems like a viable option, where I sit. I think the = only "hope" I see is that it's not a trend, it's a pendulum. You "hope" it = will start to swing the other way.   Ross "...the music is total junk..."   Whether music is junk or not has little to do with its style. It has more = to do with the intent, inspiration and skill of the composer and performer. = For example, I have great difficulty appreciating all but a few French = Romantic pieces, but I would hesitate (well, at least for a moment) calling it = "junk". Obviously, there is a lot of contemporary music that is junk. When you = hear it, you know it's already on its way to the dump.   Bruce "This building says, 'Our religion is all external... we are really here = to have fun!'"   Respectfully, I've seen other buildings that say "Our religion is dead. = This is its coffin. We are really here to sleep."     I love the organ, but I have mixed feelings about its future and how it = should be used in worship today. You can observe that things survive generally because they adapt. However, adapting the organ for contemporary music = seems to defeat the depth of the gift it was intended to bring.   Much of the worship music in my church is contemporary. At the organ, I = tend to play a mix of classical music (Bach, Brahms, etc.), and hymn = arrangements (Wood, Diemer, Manz, etc.). The emphasis is on what will communicate with = the congregation, at least as best as I can do. Occasionally, I slip in an "organized" contemporary piece, but never a "junk" piece.   At the organ, I feel that I am called to serve *and* to lead. I do not = want to continually play music that only reinforces how people are already = worshiping. I want to move people to a new, deeper, broader way of worship. At this = point in time, "new" actually references "traditional music", since that is the missing piece.   With the woman at the well, Jesus indicated we will worship "neither on = this mountain [contemporary?] nor in Jerusalem [traditional?]", but the hour is coming, "...and now is..." when we will worship "in spirit and truth".   "...and now is..."   Mark Koontz Organist Third Presbyterian Church Richmond, VA     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Got something to say? Say it better with Yahoo! Video Mail http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: How my Lent really began... From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 12:02:16 -0500   Well, Malcolm, I fear that you may be right. I almost asked in my earlier post, "Or maybe I shouldn't believe it?" Nevertheless, having had negative thoughts about the UCC for decades, I'm trying to atone with this little burst of optimism. (As I recall, one of the predecessor bodies of the UCC was the Niebuhrian German Evangelical Church.)   My college president (Pacific Lutheran Univ., Tacoma, Wash.) once told me that he thought the three churches nearest the truth of Lutheranism were the Roman, the Anglican, and the Scottish Presbyterians. In that order.   Alan   -----Original Message----- From: Malcolm Wechsler [mailto:manderusa@earthlink.net]=20 Subject: Re: How my Lent really began...   Yes, but . . . how many UCC churches would use such a thing? I remember seeing in a church where I was attending a recital something called the Presbyterian Book of Common Prayer or something very like that. It was basically the Anglican Book of Common Prayer in new clothing, and when I asked about it, I was told that only "high church" Presbyterians would use it. I think the Presbyterians in Scotland are perhaps in that category.   To stay on topic, it was a very good recital! On an awful organ!   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 15, 2002 10:22 AM Subject: RE: How my Lent really began...     Malcolm: I'm glad to hear your encouraging words, and want to tell you of a book that came to hand yesterday. Small format, leather bound, BOOK OF WORSHIP; UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST. 1986. Beautifully produced, with rubrics in red. Nearly 600 pages of really solid stuff (with SOME fluff, but not much). Explicit Real Presence, and tons more. Suddenly I feel MUCH more akin to the UCC than I did before.   Alan           "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: is this the Old West, or WHAT? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 12:03:02 -0800   Burgie just called ... he went to our bank (Union) at the corner of Beach and Edinger to make a deposit, only to discover that it had just been HELD UP ... on a busy Friday at NOON, in BROAD DAYLIGHT.   Fortunately the robbers were GONE by the time he got there.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: is this the Old West, or WHAT? From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 16:20:04 -0500       ---- Original message ---- >Burgie just called ... he went to our bank (Union) at the corner of >Beach and Edinger to make a deposit, only to discover that it had just >been HELD UP ... on a busy Friday at NOON, in BROAD DAYLIGHT.   At least they were kind enough to rob the bank BEFORE he made the deposit.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Opinions sought From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 17:03:22 -0500   Hello chatters: I have a customer that was unfortunate to have bought, at the time, a = state of the art SSL combination in the year when they only had one memory and = it cannot be upgraded. This customer desperately needs multiple memory capability and I (as the curator) am not predisposed in favour of any = system on the market. Considering my <correct> spelling of "favour" you may have guessed I am in Canada (or the U.K., I suppose). Well, I am in Canada and our dollar is performing terribly so cost is a consideration although the customer would not necessarily be considered poor Thanks, Andrew Mead Port Hope, Canada      
(back) Subject: Re: Opinions sought From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 16:00:56 -0600   Have you talked to SSL? I had a similar situation several months ago, and = they proposed a new system which would fit in with minimum difficulty. Roy Redman   Andrew Mead wrote:   > Hello chatters: > I have a customer that was unfortunate to have bought, at the time, a = state > of the art SSL combination in the year when they only had one memory and = it > cannot be upgraded. This customer desperately needs multiple memory > capability and I (as the curator) am not predisposed in favour of any = system > on the market. Considering my <correct> spelling of "favour" you may = have > guessed I am in Canada (or the U.K., I suppose). Well, I am in Canada = and > our dollar is performing terribly so cost is a consideration although = the > customer would not necessarily be considered poor > Thanks, > Andrew Mead > Port Hope, Canada > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Opinions sought From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 17:32:33 -0500   At 05:03 PM 15/02/2002 -0500, Andrew Mead wrote: > This customer desperately needs multiple memory >capability and I (as the curator) am not predisposed in favour of any = system >on the market.     (SNIP) I am familiar with one organ maintenance firm who has done considerable number of solid state conversions of stop and combination actions. They have primarily used the system of one manufacturer. They did a conversion or two by another manufacturer but found that some hoped for savings did not materialize since the labor cost to install was greater because the supplier shipped more individual parts and fewer sub-assemblies. I am sure =   there is probably a learning curve involved in all this but the technician =   who works on this full-time convinced the boss to go back to the previous supplier. In short if you have familiarity with a particular system your cost in installing it is likely to be less than for an unfamiliar system.   HD        
(back) Subject: Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT? From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 18:46:21 EST   If we are to keep up with the Old West imagery, the wording of your = account, instead of, "only to discover that it had just been HELD UP on a busy = Friday at noon, in broad daylight," should read "on a busy Friday at High Noon, = in broad daylight. The part of Burgie, of course, was portrayed by Gary = Cooper.  
(back) Subject: Re: How my Lent really began... From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 18:49:43 EST   Mark Koontz writes:   >I do not want to >continually play music that only reinforces how people are already worshiping. >I want to move people to a new, deeper, broader way of worship. At this = point >in time, "new" actually references "traditional music", since that is the >missing piece. <<   Absolutely, Mark, and thank you for saying so! My mail slot at church contained several <recommendations> for Lent and Easter from the pastor. Only one of them is familiar to me and I have been at this business about forty years. All are of the contemporary style, shallow in both = musicality and message.   My feelings on the recommendations were offered today. None of them will = be used at the two churches I serve. We will adhere to the traditional. = This brought a rather contentious response which I simply ignored. If I had a youth choir, I would consider several as appropriate. My choir, volunteer =   and quite amateur, is about median-age 60. As the choir is on average younger than the congregation median age, they are a very good barometer = of what appeals to the parishioners.   I am not opposed to all contemporary worship music. Just most of it. I = must look up the Scripture which says (paraphrased) "Be Ye in the world, but = not of the world." It fits with my most recent experience.   Thank you for your bold statement, Mark. You have an ally.   Best wishes, Jim Pitts          
(back) Subject: Re: Service music From: "J. Nathan" <jnatpat@infi.net> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 17:49:15 -0600   We at St. Peter's use the Mass in E by Jeffrey Smith. It is an elegant setting that was immediatly liked by my congregation. I first heard it done at Christ Church Cathedral/Lexington, Ky with that wonderful Holtkamp purring and stunning choir of men/boys, and never forgot the experience.   J. Nathan St. Peter's of the Lakes Episcopal Church Paducah, Ky   > Someone wrote me regarding the Schubert service music, which made me > wonder what your favorite service music set is to play and/or sing. > = Just curious.   > Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Opinions sought From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 15:59:14 -0800   Andrew,   You might give Jessie Betlyon of Betlyon Organ Service a call, he works with all types of capture electronics and is not partial to which brand, his interest is what is best to do the job, at an affordable price. He is located in Spring Grove, PA. Tel. Number (717)225-5390   Vern, Sound Research   Andrew Mead wrote: > > Hello chatters: > I have a customer that was unfortunate to have bought, at the time, a = state > of the art SSL combination in the year when they only had one memory and = it > cannot be upgraded. This customer desperately needs multiple memory > capability and I (as the curator) am not predisposed in favour of any = system > on the market. Considering my <correct> spelling of "favour" you may = have > guessed I am in Canada (or the U.K., I suppose). Well, I am in Canada = and > our dollar is performing terribly so cost is a consideration although = the > customer would not necessarily be considered poor > Thanks, > Andrew Mead > Port Hope, Canada > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: How my Lent really began... From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 18:55:12 EST     --part1_2b.2291e064.299ef9e0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > Presbyterian Book of Common Prayer   It's called the Book of Common Worship and it is a wonderful resource. Several of the New York City Presbyterian churches follow these worship = books faithfully.       --part1_2b.2291e064.299ef9e0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Presbyterian Book = of Common Prayer </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>It's called the Book of Common Worship and it is a wonderful resource. = &nbsp;Several of the New York City Presbyterian churches follow these = worship books faithfully. <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_2b.2291e064.299ef9e0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: How my Lent really began... From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 18:52:47 -0600       Malcolm Wechsler wrote:   > ...<snip>... I remember > seeing in a church where I was attending a recital something called the > Presbyterian Book of Common Prayer or something very like that. It was > basically the Anglican Book of Common Prayer in new clothing,   There is an officially published (by the PCUSA) "The Book of Common Worship", more recent editions of which do resemble the BCP. I = understand that the volume has been through more editions than the BCP, and that the earlier editions were not as similar.   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 19:01:32 -0600   Greetings from Missouri, the home State of Jesse James. Writing from a quiet and leafy neighborhood of St. Louis, and where about half the people living on our block are police, and where crime is on the whole lower than it was in rural Somerset when I was growing up half a century ago, even here we had a robbery of the Bank of America branch three or four blocks from our house a few months back. It seems that these days you can't get away from it anywhere.   John Speller   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > > If we are to keep up with the Old West imagery, the wording of your = account, > instead of, "only to discover that it had just been HELD UP on a busy = Friday > at noon, in broad daylight," should read "on a busy Friday at High Noon, = in > broad daylight. The part of Burgie, of course, was portrayed by Gary = Cooper.  
(back) Subject: Re: Correction: is this the Old West, or WHAT? From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 20:12:14 EST     --part1_102.10a2c0f3.299f0bee_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > the home State of Jesse James. > I once performed a piano concert at the home church of the James Gang. = Their father was pastor. It was a beautiful old building in a delightful rural =   setting.   I wonder if that's where the Preacher's Kid Syndrome was first realized = (no offense intended to said segment of the populace).   Neil Brown     --part1_102.10a2c0f3.299f0bee_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">the home State of = Jesse James. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I once performed a piano concert at the home = church of the James Gang. &nbsp;Their father was pastor. &nbsp;&nbsp;It = was a beautiful old building in a delightful rural setting. <BR> <BR>I wonder if that's where the Preacher's Kid Syndrome was first = realized (no offense intended to said segment of the populace). <BR> <BR>Neil Brown <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_102.10a2c0f3.299f0bee_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Correcting My Old West Story From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 20:14:32 EST     --part1_8e.231113c6.299f0c78_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     > . Their father was pastor.   Of course I'm not THAT old. I meant to say, that Rev. James was pastor of =   this church way back when.   Neil Brown   --part1_8e.231113c6.299f0c78_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. &nbsp;Their = father was pastor.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Of course I'm not THAT old. &nbsp;I meant to say, that Rev. James was = pastor of this church way back when. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>Neil Brown</FONT></HTML>   --part1_8e.231113c6.299f0c78_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Correcting My Old West Story From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2002 19:49:29 -0600   >>Rev. James was pastor of this church way back when.<<   Quimby Pipe Organs are currently building a new three manual organ for William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, one of the oldest colleges west of the Mississippi, founded in 1852. The college website has many interesting historical facts, one of which is that the James brothers' father was one of the college's board of trustees.   John Speller