PipeChat Digest #2728 - Thursday, February 28, 2002
 
Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Felix Hell at The Curtis Institute - 2/25/02
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
In praise of rap
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
vinyl
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
vinyl
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 15:20:53 -0500   Our daughters have given my wife and I a 40th anniv. gift of a trip down the river of our choice in a river boat, and the choice has falled on the Seine upstream to Paris, with some free days afterward in Paris. Genealogist that I am, I am interested in "grave matters," and in this case I'm wondering if anyone can give me guidance to any of the follow organist'= s burial sites:   Franck Widor Guilmant Messiaen Faur=E9 Saint-Saens Dubois   I know practically NOTHING about Paris, nor do I know French. I think I'm dealing with advanced knowledge to know that there is such a place as the Isle de la Cit=E9 and that Notre Dame is on it!!! :-) (No, NOT the football school!!!) So my knowledge of Paris is very elementary. That said, can anyone give me instructions in third-grade English how to get to any cemetery pertinent and to find the grave sites of any of the above therein?   Thanx.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell at The Curtis Institute - 2/25/02 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 16:05:34 -0500   Felix Hell at The Curtis Institute of Music, Monday, February 25   Dear Lists and Friends,   Last Monday (25th), I betook myself and two friends down to Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, to hear Felix Hell perform half (45 minutes) of one of the regular student recitals in the elegant but acoustically unmemorable Field Concert Hall. Well, that is a bit unfair. In truth, this rectangular space with a stage centered on one of the long walls, seating, I am guessing, about 300, is really perfectly fine for piano, voice, solo recitals on other instruments, and chamber music, which form the backbone of the school's program. So, turning off the organist-think, it is a beautifully paneled warm and responsive hall for all but the organ. This was amply demonstrated by the other half of the program, which preceded Felix's performance. We heard a breathtaking performance of the Beethoven Sonata No. 3 in A Major, Opus 69, for 'cello and piano, with Yumi Kendall, 'cellist and Chu-Fang Huang, pianist. It was simply stunning.   A little history. I first heard Felix play at Grace Church, White Plains, New York, in a noon recital. There had been a lot of buzz about him on the Internet Organ Lists, and this was a nearby opportunity to finally hear him in person. It was November of 1999, and Felix was just a few months past his 14th birthday. I did a posting about that event which ended with the following paragraph: "There was, today, a fine musician up in the gallery, in complete control, and clearly demonstrating his mastery and love of the music we heard. As a Juilliard student, studying with John Weaver, and as assistant at St. Peter's Lutheran Church, his musical development will be nurtured and guided. Listen when the opportunity arises, and if you have a church that can have a recital, hire him while you can afford him. This stock is going up!!" I wrote that "fine musician up in the gallery" bit to indicate that being 14 years old did not have anything to do with judging what we were hearing. He was then "a fine musician," period, full stop.   Moving up a little over two years, we are at Curtis, the 'cellist and pianist have accepted their hearty and well-deserved applause with hoots and hollers, and Felix appears on stage. Here's what I knew about the weekend that preceded this concert. Saturday and Sunday, Felix was on Hilton Head Island, preparing for a Sunday 4 p.m. concert at Holy Family Roman Catholic Church, playing on a large Zimmer organ, apparently a Gutezimmer, not a Badezimmer! (Sorry!) He was beginning to experience something that is a price one pays for being young - terrible pain from an unhappy wisdom tooth. He was scheduled to play on Sunday morning at two Masses, but at the end of an almost sleepless night, it was decided he would only play for the second, later Mass, which he did. This 4 p.m. concert was a new venture on the part of this church, which had been having only short noon concerts for some time. There was great uncertainty about how many might show up. Well, try 700! And Felix, mouth throbbing with pain, and terribly tired, gave apparently a superb recital. I guess perhaps he was able to get some sleep that evening, but the alarm went off at 3 a.m. so that he could catch a flight at 6 a.m., connecting to another flight at Charlotte to Philadelphia. I am not sure what time he reached home, or how rested he might have been, but from the moment he appeared on stage at Curtis until the last note sounded, you could not have known what he had been going through. Can we say Professional.? To further complicate matters, his scheduled student recital appearance had been on the books for March 22nd, but the concert manager asked if he could play this past Monday, on very short notice, because of some sort of scheduling problem, and Felix felt ready, and agreed! On top of all that, Felix had decided that it was time to do what he has not generally been doing - to play the entire concert from memory!   The program: Bach Fantasie and Fugue in G Minor (542). Ouch! The sound we heard at the grand opening of the Fantasie was not a pretty one. Rather shrill and overpowering, exacerbated, I was told, by new winding problems which caused serious tuning "anomalies" in the upperwork. "Kinzey and Lawn" to the rescue. What is the pedigree of this instrument, Aeolian-Skinner Opus 958? Well, in 1937, this opus meant a new console and Positif for an existing four-manual, 48 stop Aeolian organ. In 1941, Opus 1022 replaced the Aeolian with a five manual apparently new instrument: Great, Choir, Positif, Swell, Solo, Echo, and Pedal. The console was rebuilt in the 60s. Now, it is so easy to blame the dead for everything. M. P. Moller completely rebuilt the organ in 1974, bringing it to 5 manuals, 106 stops. This is a small room! The organ is located entirely in the ceiling! It gets out rather better than one would expect - rather too much better, I am afraid. Anyway, after the elegance and refinement of the Beethoven, we heard this rather coarse noise from on high, but began to shift our attention to Felix, who was playing with such assurance and grace, with the opening Fantasia truly being just that. He approaches the secondary material that begins in bar 9 in a unique way, with a widely spaced articulation, well-controlled, and this was done on gentle flute sounds, very much a relief from the big plenum. The Fugue was not slow - it was not shy, and in this non-resonant acoustic, it was all completely clear, and carried a great deal of excitement. It was probably just the right way to go. Contrasting Bach was next, the wonderful ornamented chorale prelude on "O Mensch, bewein . ." with a very lovely Cornet registration for the cantus, and very supple and expressive playing. There was one little memory slip of the kind that you had to know the music to recognize, and it was handled so deftly and smoothly, that one might have thought Felix had found some early, hitherto unknown manuscript, revealing it to us for the first time. It had no effect on the beauty of the performance, and no excuse need be made - but do remember, this is a sleepless young man with a bad toothache! I feared for my ears as it came time for the Liszt B-A-C-H, but I had become inured to the sound, and could concentrate on the performance. Felix knows this instrument well, and practices on it regularly and performs in organ class, also. There is a handsome new Robert Turner console with tons of memories, and Felix obviously had had time in recent weeks to work out registrations for this massive piece. It was a monumental performance, with wonderfully imaginative registrations in the gentle places. Well then, hold on to your hats. It is Norbert Schneider - Schlafes Bruder Toccata Time! There is not much one can say about either this piece or the performance. It is an almost non-stop endurance test, easily passed on this occasion, but it is also a wonderfully atmospheric, moody, and in places, moving work. The audience at these concerts is made up of students and faculty, but also of a number of Philadelphians for whom these free concerts of rare quality are a wonderful resource. Well, whoever they all are, they really let loose after the Schneider, not that they had been restrained after the other pieces. Old concert halls with wood floors provide an additional opportunity for expressing pleasure - I love the thunder of the stamping feet, and we had lots of that as well as whooping and hollering. It was quite clear, both from the noise and from the animated greetings in the hall and in the vestibule afterwards, that Felix has a strong following within this community that generously rewards talent, hard work and virtuosity. I think it pretty special seeing this coming to an organist! Some of these developing virtuosi on other instruments will, thanks to the influence of hearing the sort of thing they heard on this occasion, look with favor upon our chosen instrument and those who play it.   At last report a short while ago, Felix is on Penicillin to kill an infection, and when that goes down in the next day or so, he will enjoy the rite of passage granted to most of us at some time - The Extraction. His e-mail address is FelixHellUSA@aol.com, if you would like to cheer him up!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com              
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 15:05:03 -0600   Karl, I have the map of the cemetery showing most of these graves. Pierne', Chopin , Bizet, Grunenwald, and of course, Jim Morrison. There are others and you can find this out at the entrance. It is Le Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise. It was facinating walking through the place. Send me oyur address and I'll send you the info.   Mark      
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 17:06:33 EST   Dear Karl   When in France it helps to know some French. They speak English of course, but they expect you to know their language too. They have palm translators now so it won't be as hard, but don't leave home without one. Remember the spoof movie, *European Vacation*? There is some truth to the spoof. Germany and Holland are very much more open to English, and they speak it flawlessly. Guard against pick pockets your tour guide will help you with that. You might want to look into a tour that includes musicians and the arts. Franck was a transplanted Belgian. Meudon should be a first stop, as several Parisian organists lived there including Pierre Cochereau. Write to some of the French organists, if they are not on tour themselves they may be able to direct you to some of the Shrines of organists around Paris. The American Church, or the Anglican Church might be good places for information too.   All the best on your pending trip to France,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: In praise of rap From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 18:03:37 -0500   This is just a brief series of thoughts at the end of a workday, with no especial relevance to organ music-- simply that like other fine musicians, we value history, tradition, heritage, and the preservation of their tangible embodiments.   Here at West Chester, we are in the throes of designing library facilities for a new School of Music building. A sharp recession is not the most propitious time for such an undertaking: "cutback" seems to be the current watchword. I still can't tell which way the wind is blowing: will we end = up with a space that will serve us well for several decades well, and of = which we can be proud, or will it reek from opening day of the cramps and compromises of committee work?   In the course of these discussions, I once mentioned that, in the opinion = of the Library of Congress, the LP is a valid archival medium, whereas the CD is not. Some VIPs proceeded to misunderstand this observation with the result that it threatened to boomerang: it was suggested, or perhaps even assumed, that since LPs are archival, it would be just fine if we started housing our twenty-some thousand at a remote storage site. This was the opposite of my intent, which was to point out their continuing importance, justifying the heavy usage that we still experience. The Library of Congress's judgment is a commentary on their quality, durability, and open technology.   During coverage of business on the radio this morning, someone observed = that people today don't care to own CDs as such, they just "want the music." = He asked: Is the CD about to go the way of the 8-track tape?   Quite a few of the LPs in our collection date from the 1950s, hence are almost as old as I am. When our students get as old as I am now, will = they still be able to play their CDs?   The answer depends not only on whether the CDs themselves hold up over = time (and there is room for doubt about this, despite the breathless initial assurances from marketing that a fountain of youth had been just been invented). We are also at the mercy of whether CD players will continue = to be mass produced. Once they are obsoleted, don't count on it.   LPs have definitely become obsolete in the minds of most. Many of our incoming students appear never to have seen one in their lives. Yet we = can still play them, because we can still buy LP turntables. They have become expensive-- but they are still available. Why?   Let me assure you that these machines are not still being sold even at today's prices due to our society's libraries, audiophiles, and other weirdos still concerned about things like historical records. These would not constitute a critical mass at all. No; fossils like me and, = possibly, you, can still play our LPs because some pop artists and deejays still = need the same equipment to do *their* thing. That is the market that has primarily kept production alive.   Especially this being Black History Month and all, next time we drop the needle on a forty-year-old vinyl disc-- probably never yet re-leased as a CD-- by Fox, Biggs, Schweitzer, or Weinrich, we might pause for a word of thanks to the synergy we enjoy with rappers and hip-hoppers.   I also recall, from the BBS heydays of six or eight years ago, that your average macho teenage dude-- at least the kind verbally adept enough to write messages-- was remarkably less averse to being considered a poet = than we might assume. They would eagerly post and share poems that they wrote. These tended to read very much like rap lyrics, to be sure-- but their authors unashamedly called them poems, and some of them even were. Do you suppose this happened because English classes in their schools have = suddenly become kewl? I suspect another influence.                
(back) Subject: vinyl From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 13:22:43 +1300   Paul, Glad to see someone else supporting old records. I'm regarded as a nutter = by my musical friends as I've kept my entire collection - luckily I've got = room to store them. You can in your own ears filter out the bit of surface = noise there is, and the tone is so much better than that of CD: just listen to = the lp then the CD made from the same tape - the record wins hands = down!!!!!!!! I have some 12,500 lp's here at least, and I wouldn't part with any of = them. Too, I have about 2,000 78s and some 900 45's. And about 5 of the 16 2/3 lp's. I believe the first commercial lp came out in 1948. For many years I've had some 15 lp's from 1950, but just the other day picked up for 50c = an lp actually dated 1949, to my great delight. I believe that a number of years ago Sony produced a thingie that would = read lp's by laser, so you had all the quality of lp tone, but with not an atom of surface noise. My recording engineer friend tells me this thing would have killed the new CD industry stone dead so Sony stopped producing it almost immediately. I've never heard one. Have you? With my big hi-fi set (yes, I don't use the modern jargon "stereo" = instead) I can frighten the daylights out of my musical friends by the sheer = quality of sound I can produce - they are overawed by the sheer beauty of tone of = lp sound. Oh yes, I also have three machines to play my 78's on - 1. 1912 Decca portable with spun aluminium reflector 2. 1933 phonograph with a horn 3ft long 3. Pye "Black box" of the 1950s - electric No.2 gives the best sound, but it obviously isn't as loud as No.3. They're still making 78rpm needles, in Dundee of all places, and they're easy to buy here in NZ. Too, the same company in Wellington that sells the 78 needles still sells some 200 different lp styluses and cartridges - and have no intention of quitting because they sell so many. On the other hand, first-class lp's are only about $2 to $5 each brandnew even if 25 years old. And if you go to a junkshop, opshop, that sort of place, you can get good lp's, made in the 1980s and unmarked, for 50c = each. So, for the cost of a pack of fish'n'chips I can get myself, when I feel like it, ten lp's that I'd want to keep. When you work it out, that's only about 60c per hour for re-useable good sound - absolutely wonderful. Sorry I've gone on about this, but the younger generation need to know = that not all old technology is bad, and not all new technology is good. It's most interesting listening to old records again - just in Bach sets = of organ recordings, you can contrast L.Rogg's Grossmunster set with = W.Kraft's lot with E.Power Bigg's ones with Helmut Walcha's with Rogg's Silbermann = set with W.Stockmeier's, and so on. Even with the theatre organ, the old sound can be wonderful - lp = recordings of George Wright, for example, are great: his complete lp of "South = Pacific" is still a real treasure. I have CD's too, of course, but on my income I can't afford them except = very occasionally - and anyway, I'd rather have 60 lp's than one CD. Kind regards, Ross        
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 19:23:22 -0800 (PST)   Ooooh, Karl - don't forget to look up the site for Dupre! SteveOhmer --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Dear Karl > > When in France it helps to know some French. > They speak English > of course, but they expect you to know their > language too. They have > palm translators now so it won't be as hard, > but don't leave home > without one. Remember the spoof movie, > *European Vacation*? There > is some truth to the spoof. Germany and Holland > are very much more > open to English, and they speak it flawlessly. > Guard against pick pockets > your tour guide will help you with that. You > might want to look into a > tour that includes musicians and the arts. > Franck was a transplanted > Belgian. Meudon should be a first stop, as > several Parisian organists > lived there including Pierre Cochereau. Write > to some of the French > organists, if they are not on tour themselves > they may be able to > direct you to some of the Shrines of organists > around Paris. The American > Church, or the Anglican Church might be good > places for information too. > > All the best on your pending trip to France, > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 21:43:41 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 9:23 PM Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted)     > Ooooh, Karl - don't forget to look up the site > for Dupre!   He was listed on the map for Le Pere Lachaise Cimetiere, but I couldn't = find him. I was looking over the map since my last post and found such notables as Honore de Balzac, Poulenc, Vincenzo Bellini, Alain (familie) Delacroix, Dukas,.    
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 22:36:03 -0500   Dear Mark,   > I have the map of the cemetery showing most of these graves. Pierne', > Chopin , Bizet, Grunenwald, and of course, Jim Morrison. There are = others > and you can find this out at the entrance. It is Le Cimetiere du > Pere-Lachaise. It was facinating walking through the place. Send me oyur > address and I'll send you the info.   I truly appreciate your kindness. If you are so willing:   Dr. Karl E. Moyer 1309 Passey Lane LANCASTER PA 17603-6311    
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 22:48:38 -0500   Dear Ron,   Many, many thanks for all these comments.   Cordially,   Karl   > From: RonSeverin@aol.com > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 17:06:33 EST > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: Paris Cemeteries (X-posted) > > Dear Karl > > When in France it helps to know some French. They speak English > of course, but they expect you to know their language too. They have > palm translators now so it won't be as hard, but don't leave home > without one. Remember the spoof movie, *European Vacation*? There > is some truth to the spoof. Germany and Holland are very much more > open to English, and they speak it flawlessly. Guard against pick = pockets > your tour guide will help you with that. You might want to look into a > tour that includes musicians and the arts. Franck was a transplanted > Belgian. Meudon should be a first stop, as several Parisian organists > lived there including Pierre Cochereau. Write to some of the French > organists, if they are not on tour themselves they may be able to > direct you to some of the Shrines of organists around Paris. The = American > Church, or the Anglican Church might be good places for information too. > > All the best on your pending trip to France, > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: vinyl From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 19:31:00 +1300   Dear Dave, Thanks for your note. No, sorry, don't have that music and must confess I don't even know it. Regards, Ross