PipeChat Digest #2614 - Tuesday, January 1, 2002
 
Wellington Cathedral (was Re: shifting organs)
  by "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net>
reeds staying in tune
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Cornopean
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Cornopean
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
OFF-TOPIC, but TOO good to pass up (grin) (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
French Baroque registration in the Archives (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: reeds staying in tune
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: shifting organs
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
purgatory (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: shifting organs / Why Karl????
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Cornopean
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: purgatory (X-posted)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: shifting organs
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: shifting organs / Why Karl????
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Wellington Cathedral (was Re: shifting organs) From: "Harry E. Martenas" <harrym@epix.net> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 07:41:17 -0500   Ross's posting about Wellington Cathedral (NZ) got me curious, and I did some searching.   A picture of the curious "non-facade" and an introduction can be found at http://cathedral.wellington.net.nz/Music/organs/cathedral/index.htm. (I = wish the picture was better- the horizontal reed seems to have a windchest hovering over it, cantilevered out from the wall. Ross - is that section = of the installation permanent? It has sort of a temporary look about it. = Maybe this picture was taken while major maintenance was being performed?)   More information, pictures, and the current stoplist can be found at http://www.cathedral.wellington.net.nz/Features/Organ/index.htm   (A dramatic picture of the cathedral's exterior can be found at http://cathedral.wellington.net.nz/.)   /Harry Martenas    
(back) Subject: reeds staying in tune From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 08:42:03 EST     --part1_123.96a7064.2961c52b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Bud, Perhaps several factors are at work here. Not knowing the size of St. Mary's RC, I would suggest: 1. the larger size of a cathedral would allow for some reverberation in = which slightly out of tune reeds would blend into the reverberating musical = tones, or 2. the listeners were so impressed by the music that out of tune reeds = were not noticed. (or no one cared that they were out of tune)   The cathedrals of Europe up through the late 19th century had no heating = or AC. Were these seasonally tuned?   Perhaps our European brethren could enlighten us?   Stan Krider     In a message dated 12/31/2001 5:05:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > > Maybe it's my failing memory, maybe it was the higher wind-pressures, > but I don't recall temperature changes being a big problem for older > organs ... one in particular: Old St. Mary's RC, Cincinnati, Austin, > 1928 ... reeds: > > Great - 8 French Trumpet > Swell - 8 Oboe, Vox Humana > Choir - 8 Bassoon (added, from Cinti Music Hall Organ), Clarinet, > English Horn > Pedal - 16 Trombone > > (rest of post omitted for brevity)     --part1_123.96a7064.2961c52b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3>Hi Bud, <BR> Perhaps several factors are at work here. <BR> Not knowing the size of St. Mary's RC, I would suggest:<BR> 1. the larger size of a cathedral would allow for some reverberation in = which slightly out of tune reeds would blend into the reverberating = musical tones, or<BR> 2. the listeners were so impressed by the music that out of tune reeds = were not noticed. (or no one cared that they were out of tune)<BR> <BR> The cathedrals of Europe up through the late 19th century had no heating = or AC. Were these seasonally tuned? <BR> <BR> Perhaps our European brethren could enlighten us?<BR> <BR> Stan Krider<BR> <BR> <BR> In a message dated 12/31/2001 5:05:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, = </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0">quilisma@socal.rr.com</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> writes:<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE = TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> <BR> Maybe it's my failing memory, maybe it was the higher wind-pressures,<BR> but I don't recall temperature changes being a big problem for older<BR> organs ... one in particular: Old St. Mary's RC, Cincinnati, Austin,<BR> 1928 ... reeds:<BR> <BR> Great - 8 French Trumpet<BR> Swell - 8 Oboe, Vox Humana<BR> Choir - 8 Bassoon (added, from Cinti Music Hall Organ), Clarinet,<BR> English Horn<BR> Pedal - 16 Trombone<BR> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE>(rest of post omitted for brevity)<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_123.96a7064.2961c52b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 08:36:44 -0600   I don't think it is your fading memory. Some of this depends on the way the organ is laid out -- if the divisions are placed at different levels, obviously some voices will be out of tune with each other, but even then the individual reeds should still be in tune with themselves -- for example, when played in octaves. A lot depends on the design of the reeds concerned. Some organbuilders can make reeds that stay in tune and some cannot. The purchasers of organs on the whole pay less attention to this than they ought to. They understandably want reeds that sound nice, but they ought to be looking for reeds that are stable as well.   John Speller   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Maybe it's my failing memory, maybe it was the higher wind-pressures, > but I don't recall temperature changes being a big problem for older > organs ...      
(back) Subject: Re: Cornopean From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 06:39:38 -0800   I know the subject is becoming a little stale now, but I have been looking through Australia and British organ specs to check on Cornopeans. They seemed to be the preferred swell chorus reed with many English and Australian builders for a long time 19th and 20th century. Organs are still being built with a Cornopean 8 on the swell, for instance the LeTourneau organ in St Mary's Cathedral in Sydney has one as the swell chorus reed, and that is a brand new organ. Second in popularity would be the Horn during this period. Bob Elms.  
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 06:57:28 -0800 (PST)     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: > The purchasers of organs on the whole pay less attention to this > than they ought to. They understandably want reeds that sound nice, but > they ought to be looking for reeds that are stable as well. >   I always thought that the construction of the pipes and the thickness of = the tongue was heavier when the pressure was slightly higher than what I grew up with (3" or = less.) However, I played a small Moller built in 1978 which had but one Trompette unit, a small = scaled thing playable at 16-8-4, with a 1/2L bass. Hardly ever did it move at all, and the organ = was on 3" wind. Occasionally when the room was cold the reed was out of tune with the rest = of the organ, but isn't that the flue pipes moving more so than the reed?   My current organ has 2 Durst reeds. The Oboe is fairly stable, but the = Trumpet moves around and the 16' octave which has a rather strange parallel shallotts an extremely = narrow, thin reeds, is troublesome, difficult to get regulated, and the slightest change in = weather causes several notes to try to jump to their octave rather than fundamental. I am thinking of = having new boot/reed/block units made for the bottomo 12. When they are in good = regulation they sound fine, but are quite undependable! Any suggestions??   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry, Director of Music Ministry & Organist Mona Dena, Assistant & Principal Conductor The Episcopal Church of St. Peter 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Send your FREE holiday greetings online! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 11:22:05 EST   Dear Bud   I think you answered your own question without knowing it. The old organ you described pumped air to the pipes of relatively the same temperature as the building where the pipes were planted. A/C requires that the air intake to the blowers in more modern work be from inside the building where the A/C has equalized the temperature. This would produce a similar result. Pumping outside air will create tremendous problems for A/C buildings.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Cornopean From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 11:40:38 EST   Hi Bob   LeTourneau may have bowed to tradition in naming the stop, knowing it was expected (Cornopean) but may have flavored it to meet his personal taste (French). On close observation it may be found to be much brighter than ordinary Cornopeans of the last century. It's just a calculated thought.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 11:46:09 EST   Dear Randy   Are you drawing your air from outside the building or inside? In your case it could make a great deal of difference as to how the pipes react. I would suggest drawing air for the organ from inside the building. This especially if the air is treated by A/C.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC, but TOO good to pass up (grin) (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 09:43:37 -0800   There was once a young man who, in his youth, professed his desire become a great writer.   When asked to define "great" he said,   "I want to write stuff that the whole world will read, stuff that people will react to on a truly emotional level, stuff that will make them scream, cry, and howl in pain and anger!"   He now works for Microsoft writing error messages.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 09:48:01 -0800   The Swell, Choir and most of the Pedal were on the main floor of the = gallery; the Great was above and behind. The entire organ was on 7'' wind (grin); = the church was VERY reverberant, and seated in excesss of 1000, to answer = Stan's question.   Everyone who heard the organ was struck by the excellent quality of the = French Trumpet ... haven't a CLUE who voiced it ... anyone know who the reed = voicer was at Austin in 1928?   Cheers,   Bud   "John L. Speller" wrote:   > I don't think it is your fading memory. Some of this depends on the way > the organ is laid out -- if the divisions are placed at different = levels, > obviously some voices will be out of tune with each other, but even then > the individual reeds should still be in tune with themselves -- for > example, when played in octaves. A lot depends on the design of the = reeds > concerned. Some organbuilders can make reeds that stay in tune and = some > cannot. The purchasers of organs on the whole pay less attention to = this > than they ought to. They understandably want reeds that sound nice, but > they ought to be looking for reeds that are stable as well. > > John Speller > > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > Maybe it's my failing memory, maybe it was the higher wind-pressures, > > but I don't recall temperature changes being a big problem for older > > organs ... > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: French Baroque registration in the Archives (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 13:30:02 -0800   Can somebody find that thing I wrote about French Baroque registration? *I* can't, and somebody's asking for it.   THANKS!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: reeds staying in tune From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 18:06:16 EST     --part1_74.15b694eb.29624968_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/31/2001 9:58:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, randyterryus@yahoo.com writes:     > My current organ has 2 Durst reeds. The Oboe is fairly stable, but the > Trumpet moves around and > the 16' octave which has a rather strange parallel shallotts an = extremely > narrow, thin reeds, is > troublesome, difficult to get regulated, and the slightest change in > weather causes several notes > to try to jump to their octave rather than fundamental. I am thinking of =   > having new > boot/reed/block units made for the bottomo 12. When they are in good > regulation they sound fine, >   You don't say what windpressure the reeds (and the rest of the organ for = that matter) are voiced on, and also you dodn't say if the 16' octave is full-length or fractional-length, but both of these factors will affect = the stability. It may be possible also that there is a winding problem if the = 16' octave is on an offset chest.   I service an organ here in this area (Shenandoah Valley of VA) that has = had stability problems in the bottom of the 16' octave (it is a unit = trompette). It has a triple-whammy going agianst it... very light wind pressure (with = the necessaruly thin tongues and smaller shallots), fractional-length = resonators (which make getting a decent 'fundamental' difficult) and it is winded = thru another offset chest at the treble end of the reed chest with a (too small = in m,y opinion) windline that constricts sufficient volume of wind.   Rick in VA   --part1_74.15b694eb.29624968_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/31/2001 9:58:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, randyterryus@yahoo.com = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">My current organ = has 2 Durst reeds. The Oboe is fairly stable, but the Trumpet moves around = and <BR>the 16' octave which has a rather strange parallel shallotts an = extremely narrow, thin reeds, is <BR>troublesome, difficult to get regulated, and the slightest change in = weather causes several notes <BR>to try to jump to their octave rather than fundamental. I am thinking = of having new <BR>boot/reed/block units made for the bottomo 12. When they are in good = regulation they sound fine, <BR>but are quite undependable! Any suggestions??</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>You don't say what windpressure the reeds (and the rest of the organ = for that matter) are voiced on, and also you dodn't say if the 16' octave = is full-length or fractional-length, but both of these factors will affect = the stability. It may be possible also that there is a winding problem if = the 16' octave is on an offset chest. <BR> <BR>I service an organ here in this area (Shenandoah Valley of VA) that = has had stability problems in the bottom of the 16' octave (it is a unit = trompette). It has a triple-whammy going agianst it... very light wind = pressure (with the necessaruly thin tongues and smaller shallots), = fractional-length resonators (which make getting a decent 'fundamental' = difficult) and it is winded thru another offset chest at the treble end of = the reed chest with a (too small in m,y opinion) windline that constricts = sufficient volume of wind. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_74.15b694eb.29624968_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: shifting organs From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 19:32:27 -0500   Why do Ross and Lynda Wards keep sending messages in attachments that some of us can't read????   > From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 21:10:56 +1300 > To: <Pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: shifting organs > >    
(back) Subject: purgatory (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 16:53:15 -0800   Purgatory (if not Hell) is going to be:   Being locked in a room with Eric Routley and Marion Hatchett.   Discussing liturgy. (grin)       Cheers,   Bud, who likes the Bach harmonisation of "Wie schoen leuchtet" just FINE, thankyewverymuch, AND Mass facing EASTWARD, preferably in LATIN    
(back) Subject: Re: shifting organs / Why Karl???? From: "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 20:36:30 -0500       Karl Moyer wrote: > > Why do Ross and Lynda Wards keep sending messages in attachments that = some > of us can't read???? > > > From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> > > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 21:10:56 +1300 > > To: <Pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Subject: shifting organs   Karl, Why? Maybe, because the messages are not worth reading?   Maybe David could arrange special events in this burgeoning New Year of 2002 such as 'HTML night', 'attachments only day', and ONLY OFF-TOPICS = PLEASE!   ....just a humble suggestion..   HEY! HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYBODY!!   Stan Lowkis Ipswich, MA   http://www.jibjab.com/default.asp?flash4=3Dtrue    
(back) Subject: Re: Cornopean From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 17:49:35 -0800   I haven't a clue about that, Ron. I have not heard the organ yet, and probably never will considering the distance away from where I live (over 2000 miles). Maybe Pastor could tell us about that if he is reading this.   My comment was merely that the Cornopean was a very common stop in this country in the 19th and early 20th century, and I noted two recent examples, the St Mary's Le Tourneau and the University of WA Walker of the 1960s.   I can remember hearing the Cornopean in a Fremantle Church (now demolished) on a Norman and Beard organ of around 1890. It had a rich broad and smooth sound and could be played in hymn accompaniment by itself. Another in a Fuller (Aust) organ in Fremantle has the swell Cornopean as the sole reed. I remember that it did not blend quite so well with the flue work. I am working from memory here as I have not heard either organ for many years now. The reeds on the University organ are rather fiery, but then it is classical voicing and I would not expect the same characteristic as a romantically voiced reed at higher wind pressure. Happy New Year to all! Bob Elms.   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > > Hi Bob > > LeTourneau may have bowed to tradition in naming the stop, knowing > it was expected (Cornopean) but may have flavored it to meet his > personal taste (French). On close observation it may be found to be > much brighter than ordinary Cornopeans of the last century. It's just > a calculated thought.  
(back) Subject: Re: purgatory (X-posted) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 22:29:06 EST     --part1_18.17e1e007.29628702_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/31/01 7:49:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:     > Purgatory (if not Hell) is going to be: > > Being locked in a room with Eric Routley and Marion Hatchett. > > Discussing liturgy. (grin) >   With Bishop Pike as the moderator!!   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_18.17e1e007.29628702_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 12/31/01 7:49:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Purgatory (if not = Hell) is going to be: <BR> <BR>Being locked in a room with Eric Routley and Marion Hatchett. <BR> <BR>Discussing liturgy. (grin) <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>With Bishop Pike as the moderator!! <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_18.17e1e007.29628702_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: shifting organs From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 23:07:36 +1300   Sorry, but I don't know how to make attachments, how to avoid them, or = even have any idea what they are. I just type in under Reply to Author or = Compose New Message. What am I doing wrong? Regards, Ross -----Original Message----- From: Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, January 01, 2002 1:48 PM Subject: Re: shifting organs     >Why do Ross and Lynda Wards keep sending messages in attachments that = some >of us can't read???? > >> From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 21:10:56 +1300 >> To: <Pipechat@pipechat.org> >> Subject: shifting organs >> >> > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: shifting organs / Why Karl???? From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 23:09:39 +1300   Nice to know I'm not worth reading, as well as being pretty ignorant computer-wise. Thank you for your compliments. Ross -----Original Message----- From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, January 01, 2002 2:36 PM Subject: Re: shifting organs / Why Karl????     > > >Karl Moyer wrote: >> >> Why do Ross and Lynda Wards keep sending messages in attachments that some >> of us can't read???? >> >> > From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >> > Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2001 21:10:56 +1300 >> > To: <Pipechat@pipechat.org> >> > Subject: shifting organs > >Karl, > >Why? Maybe, because the messages are not worth reading? > >Maybe David could arrange special events in this burgeoning New Year of >2002 such as 'HTML night', 'attachments only day', and ONLY OFF-TOPICS PLEASE! > >...just a humble suggestion.. > >HEY! HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYBODY!! > >Stan Lowkis >Ipswich, MA > >http://www.jibjab.com/default.asp?flash4=3Dtrue > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >