PipeChat Digest #2618 - Wednesday, January 2, 2002
 
Re: Rick Veague
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
Francis Booth, Organ Builder
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Learning
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
definitions
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: definitions
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Learning
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Learning
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: definitions
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Learning
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Learning
  by "David Scribner" <dcscribner@earthlink.net>
Interregnums and new incumbents...
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: definitions
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: computer help needed (X-posted)
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
RE: not-too-difficult soprano solo
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Mozart organ works
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Mozart organ works
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: Mozart organ works
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Rick Veague From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 06:23:14 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C19355.F5A02160 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   This is so sad. I was thinking of Rick just a couple of days ago, as I = =3D had been chatting with him regularly until the past few months. I knew = =3D that he was sick, but did not know how much.   We will miss him. He was always down to earth with his comments   Jim H ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Shirley Vanest=3D20 To: pipechat=3D20 Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2002 10:40 PM Subject: Rick Veague     Just a short note to let those of you who know Rick via Pipechat, he =3D is dying of lung and brain cancer. Thanks.   Mr. and Mrs. Kendall White 430 N Main Rushville IN 46173-1638 koehnken@comsys.net       To be completely honest is to realize you really are not, therefore? = =3D Ness     =3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C19355.F5A02160 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>This is so sad.&nbsp; I was thinking = of =3D Rick just a=3D20 couple of days ago, as I had been chatting with him regularly until the = =3D past few=3D20 months.&nbsp; I knew that he was sick, but did not know how =3D much.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>We will miss him.&nbsp; He was always = =3D down to earth=3D20 with his comments</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Jim H</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3Dkoehnken@comsys.net =3D href=3D3D"mailto:koehnken@comsys.net">Shirley=3D20 Vanest</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, January 01, 2002 = =3D 10:40=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Rick Veague</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4>Just a short note = =3D to let those=3D20 of you who know Rick via Pipechat, he is dying of lung and brain =3D cancer.&nbsp;=3D20 </FONT></STRONG><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"=3D20 size=3D3D4>Thanks.</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" =3D size=3D3D4></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4>Mr. and Mrs. =3D Kendall=3D20 White</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4>430 N=3D20 Main</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4>Rushville IN=3D20 46173-1638</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4><A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:koehnken@comsys.net">koehnken@comsys.net</A></FONT></STRON= =3D G></DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" =3D size=3D3D4></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" =3D size=3D3D4></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS" size=3D3D4>To be completely = =3D honest is to=3D20 realize you really are not, therefore?&nbsp; =3D Ness</FONT></STRONG></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><STRONG><FONT face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"=3D20 size=3D3D4><BR></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0017_01C19355.F5A02160--    
(back) Subject: Francis Booth, Organ Builder From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 11:12:29 -0000   I've been trying for some years to discover the early history of the 1859 Francis Booth (of Wakefield, UK) organ in St Johns, Market Weighton, nr York, details on my website. It was bought by the church in 1878. The whereabouts of this excellent small organ in the first 19 years of its = life are a mistery. It has been suggested that it may have been the builder's factory or demonstration organ, but this is pure speculation.   The organ is unusual in that it has sliderless chests, perhaps it was a = 'one off' experimental job. Francis Booth's records seem to have disappeared - = he died in 1874 I believe so it's not surprising.   I know it's a long shot, but does anyone have any information.   Bruce Miles     mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Learning From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 12:15:01 -0500   Hi everyone, Happy New Year to you all. My question has to do with organ pipe voicing. Is there a book available out there that deals with voicing with regard specifically to or has a chapter or more dedicated to "mixtures"? For example, why "mixtures" break where they do and which = voices (flute, principle) is used for any specific "mixture." If you didn't get = it, I'm using the term "mixtures" as a generic term for mixture, fourniture, cymbel, scharf, blah, blah and on. I have Audesley and Barnes and this one and that one on organ building, and that not in their purvue. Thank you, Robert   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org    
(back) Subject: definitions From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 10:21:33 +1300   Dear List, Several people have criticised my definitions of pipe tone while I've been on this List - just a few weeks of membership, with one person suggesting that maybe my postings aren't worth reading. Well, he's entitled to his opinion, of course. Ignoring authorities (like Sumner) and misquoting = others (like Audsley) has not produced sensible discussion. Nevertheless, I wish to quote acknowledged organ expert W.L.Sumner on = three things. I just found my copy again last night, as things have been in a shambles since my shifting house a couple of months ago. CORNOPEAN The tone should be thin and brassy in separate notes, but reedy and resonant when played in chords. OBOE No attempt was made to imitate the Orchestral Oboe, unless the stop = was labelled Orchestral Oboe, in which case it was usually found in the Solo = or Choir organ. SESQUIALTERA In German and Dutch organs the ranks are of Principal scale.   Forgive me if I'm wrong, but aren't those three points precisely what I = was arguing for? 1. that a Cornopean is not Horn-like 2. that an Oboe is not meant to be imitative 3. that the Sesuqialtera is not composed of flutes.   Opinion is one thing. Accuracy is another.   Regards to all :-) Ross of NZ          
(back) Subject: Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:12:06 EST     --part1_b4.454ba8e.2964d1a6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/2/02 11:30:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes:     > The organ is unusual in that it has sliderless chests, perhaps it was a = 'one > off' experimental job.   Can you elaborate on the "sliderless" chests. Sounds interesting.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_b4.454ba8e.2964d1a6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/2/02 11:30:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The organ is = unusual in that it has sliderless chests, perhaps it was a 'one <BR>off' experimental job. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Can you elaborate on the "sliderless" chests. &nbsp;&nbsp;Sounds = interesting. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_b4.454ba8e.2964d1a6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: definitions From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:18:44 EST   Hi Ross   You need a thick skin to deal with some in this little group. I think there is a consesus among the readers, that your knowledge of NZ pipe organs should eventually find it's way into print. CD's also help in hearing examples of the organs you talk about.   Wellington Cathedral has me puzzled. What is that strange arrangement of wood and pipes sticking out of the tone opening? In the picture it's hard to tell what it is. I'm assuming it's an en Chamade NZ style, but it appears too thick by double. Is that what the archetect proposed and nobody likes? The picture is rather dark, so it's difficult to get a perspective of the details.   All the best,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:49:49 EST     --part1_199.9a3079.2964da7d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Bruce, I really enjoyed visiting your webpage. The organs are very interesting =   and the sound clips (especially theatre ones!) were excellent. Your playing???   I was just wondering..... why we some theatre organ consoles so big? = Was it just for effect, or was it full of relays and other unificagoodies?? Thanks.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_199.9a3079.2964da7d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Bruce, <BR>I really enjoyed visiting your webpage. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The organs = are very interesting and the sound clips (especially theatre ones!) were = excellent. &nbsp;&nbsp;Your playing??? <BR> <BR>I was just wondering..... why we some theatre organ consoles so big? = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Was it just for effect, or was it full of relays and = other unificagoodies?? &nbsp;&nbsp;Thanks. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_199.9a3079.2964da7d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:50:58 EST     --part1_104.ecb5186.2964dac2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/2/2002 12:15:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:     > . Is there a book available out there that deals with voicing > with regard specifically to or has a chapter or more dedicated to > "mixtures"? For example, why "mixtures" break where they do and which = voices > (flute, principle) is used for any specific "mixture." If you didn't get = it, > I'm using the term "mixtures" as a generic term for mixture, = fourniture, >   Robert - I am not aware of any books that go into that kind of detail on the design = of mixtures, scaling, cutup's and so on...BUT there is a videotape, i think = of an AIO lecture given by George Taylor (of taylor and Boody) that tells of = his design principles and approach to scaling, breaks etc. You might try contacting the AIO thru Sebastian Gluck (TubaMagna@aol.com) who is the = editor of the AIO newsletter or by contacting Steve Malionek (thru C B Fisk or = the OHS, which may also sell these tapes) who is the producer/editor of the = AIO video lecture series.   Rick in VA   --part1_104.ecb5186.2964dac2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/2/2002 12:15:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">. Is there a book = available out there that deals with voicing <BR>with regard specifically to or has a chapter or more dedicated to <BR>"mixtures"? For example, why "mixtures" break where they do and which = voices <BR>(flute, principle) is used for any specific "mixture." If you didn't = get it, <BR>I'm using the term "mixtures" as a generic &nbsp;term for mixture, = fourniture, <BR>cymbel, scharf, blah, blah and on. I </BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Robert - <BR>I am not aware of any books that go into that kind of detail on the = design of mixtures, scaling, cutup's and so on...BUT there is a videotape, = i think of an AIO lecture given by George Taylor (of taylor and Boody) = that tells of his design principles and approach to scaling, breaks etc. = You might try contacting the AIO thru Sebastian Gluck (TubaMagna@aol.com) = who is the editor of the AIO newsletter or by contacting Steve Malionek = (thru C B Fisk or the OHS, which may also sell these tapes) who is the = producer/editor of the AIO video lecture series. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_104.ecb5186.2964dac2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:55:36 EST     --part1_c9.1b185990.2964dbd8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/2/02 12:15:38 PM Eastern Standard Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org writes:     > why "mixtures" break where they do and which voices > (flute, principle) is used for any specific "mixture."   I think it would be great fun to have a seven or eight rank chest for = playing with mixture composition.... and, of course, a nice assortment of pipes. = It would be really interesting to hear how the mixture changed with varying combinations of pitches. I've long been of the opinion that mixtures are =   too high pitched at the treble end and would like to hear what it would = sound like if the pitches broke back even further than is traditional.   I do hope one of our resident builders will give us a nice lesson on = mixture composition. Thanks for bringing it up.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_c9.1b185990.2964dbd8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/2/02 12:15:38 PM Eastern Standard Time, RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org = writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">why "mixtures" = break where they do and which voices <BR>(flute, principle) is used for any specific "mixture." </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>I think it would be great fun to have a seven or eight rank chest for = playing with mixture composition.... and, of course, a nice assortment of = pipes. &nbsp;It would be really interesting to hear how the mixture = changed with varying combinations of pitches. &nbsp;&nbsp;I've long been = of the opinion that mixtures are too high pitched at the treble end and = would like to hear what it would sound like if the pitches broke back even = further than is traditional. <BR> <BR>I do hope one of our resident builders will give us a nice lesson on = mixture composition. &nbsp;&nbsp;Thanks for bringing it up. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_c9.1b185990.2964dbd8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: definitions From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 17:08:32 EST   See Bonavia-Hunt, "Modern Organ Stops," page 12.  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 17:12:13 EST   Volume 14, Number 1 (March 1999) of The Journal of American Organbuilding = has an article on mixture voicing that I wrote for the AIO.   I know that there is at least one book being written now on the history = and design of mixtures, supposedly understandable to both organists and organbuilders. I do not know the status of that project at the moment.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Learning From: "David Scribner" <dcscribner@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 16:09:59 -0600   At 4:50 PM -0500 1/2/02, RMaryman@aol.com wrote: >I am not aware of any books that go into that kind of detail on the >design of mixtures, scaling, cutup's and so on...BUT there is a >videotape, i think of an AIO lecture given by George Taylor (of >taylor and Boody) that tells of his design principles and approach >to scaling, breaks etc. You might try contacting the AIO thru >Sebastian Gluck (TubaMagna@aol.com) who is the editor of the AIO >newsletter or by contacting Steve Malionek (thru C B Fisk or the >OHS, which may also sell these tapes) who is the producer/editor of >the AIO video lecture series.   Or you can go to the AIO Web Site (http://www.pipeorgan.org) where you will find the listing of tapes available. I list hasn't been updated recently although I do have some updates to do which I just received from Steve before leaving for New Orleans. In case you haven't figured out, your list owner is also the AIO WebMaster. <G>   BTW, we should also congratulate Sebastian on his recent appointment as the Editor of the "Journal of American Organbuilding" I'm sure that he is going to do a splendid job with the Journal.   From a rather COLD New Orleans   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Interregnums and new incumbents... From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 22:55:11 -0000   Hello list!   I've had this on my mind for a few days, but now it has been officially announced by Lambeth Palace, I can talk about it! The Rector of the = Parish where I am Organist and Choirmaster has been appointed the new Archdeacon = of Maidstone (in the Canterbury Diocese, UK). This is my first appointment = as Organist and Choirmaster as I'm still fairly youthful (24) and I have no experience of working in an interregnum or being part of appointing a new incumbent. I suppose what I'm scared of is getting a new guy (or girl!) that could destroy everything I've worked hard at building up over the = last four and a half years. I would be interested in hearing from others who have worked through similar situations and what the outcome was! let me = have the bad stories as well as the good ones! At least one good thing might come from it - I may be able to negotiate a better salary under a new incumbent as at the moment I'm on about half the RSCM recommended = salary... but that's another story!   Thanks!   Steve Barker Organist and Choirmaster, St Stephen's Church, Canterbury Education and Training Officer, Canterbury Diocese RSCM   P.S. Maybe there are some nice musical Church of England clergy on this list looking for a new post?!?!    
(back) Subject: Re: definitions From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 13:02:22 +1300   Oh yes, but like me Bonavia-Hunt was an Anglican clergyman, like me, and = you know they can't be trusted. :-) To be honest, I've never valued Bonavia-Hunt's ideas - look at his ideas = on tonal design. YUK. Ross -----Original Message----- From: TubaMagna@aol.com <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, January 03, 2002 11:09 AM Subject: Re: definitions     >See Bonavia-Hunt, "Modern Organ Stops," page 12. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: computer help needed (X-posted) From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 19:08:50 EST   In a message dated 12/28/2001 12:57:43 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   > The Rector now insists on pointed Psalms, rather than written out with > the music. I'm basically using the 1940 Hymnal pointing, which requires > upright lines, and dots in the center of the line, rather than on the > baseline. Both are in the "Symbols" window. I'm using Corel WordPerfect > 8. How do I create macros or "express keys" for the line and the dot so > I don't have to keep copying and pasting them? > > Not a 'puter genius here ... > does WordPerfect have AutoCorrect, like MS Word? Merry  
(back) Subject: RE: not-too-difficult soprano solo From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 18:10:45 -0600   I am thrilled that (1) Malcolm reads my posts, and (2) that he also likes the now obscure "The Little Road to Bethlehem", a lovely little piece.   Just today I thought of another decadent piece that would work for a light soprano at Epiphany: "Nazareth" by Charles Francois Gounod. Henry F. Chorley's translation/English words to the second versicle run (after a run through of the refrain and a first verse about the shepherds):   Kings from a far land, draw near, and behold Him, Led by the beam whose warning bade ye come, Your crowns cast down, with robe royal enfold Him Your King descends to earth from brighter home - [Refrain] Though poor be the chamber, come here, come and adore; Lo! The Lord of Heaven hath to mortals given Life for evermore.   The next verse is also appropriate to Epiphany:   Wind to the cedars proclaim the joyful story, Wave of the sea, the tidings afar - The night is gone! Behold in all its glory All broad and bright rises the Eternal Morning Star. [Refrain]   My copy is very old and faded, and has no publisher info. However, a Google search of "Charles Gounod Nazareth" brings up some possible sites for the score. This old copy is for solo voice in E flat, and goes no higher than E flat. However, I believe there are versions for SATB and probably other combinations.   Hope this helps and is not too late for your purposes.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Mozart organ works From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 18:39:06 -0600   Mozart's B-day is coming up, and I had a question or two:   (1) A few years ago I bought some Master's reprints of some of Mozart's shorter organ works and fugues with introductions. Does anyone play thes?   (2) I recall seeing some CD in a past OHS catalogue about Mozart's "church sonatas". Can anyone give me details of these works?   I am familiar with the 3 sonatas supposedly written for musical clock, particularly the Fantaisie in f minor which I dearly love (K. 608 or 609 or something, but who's counting?). But I was looking for something appropriate for church, and appreciate your help.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart organ works From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 19:50:04 EST   In a message dated 1/2/2002 7:40:15 PM Eastern Standard Time, gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com writes:   > > (2) I recall seeing some CD in a past OHS catalogue about Mozart's > "church sonatas". Can anyone give me details of these works?   the church sonatas are with string orchestra. the organ part is minimal. =   some movements have been arranged for organ solo; i have seen a couple in different collections. merry  
(back) Subject: Re: Mozart organ works From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 16:59:16 -0800       Glenda wrote:   > Mozart's B-day is coming up, and I had a question or two: > > (1) A few years ago I bought some Master's reprints of some of Mozart's > shorter organ works and fugues with introductions. Does anyone play > thes? > > (2) I recall seeing some CD in a past OHS catalogue about Mozart's > "church sonatas". Can anyone give me details of these works?   The Church Sonatas are for two violins, 'cello and organ (the viola was considered a "secular" instrument of the theatre orchestra in Mozart's = time, for some reason), a few of the festal C Major ones also call for trumpets, (oboe and bassoon) and timpani, and were undoubtedly played with the = bigger C Major Masses that also called for them, since the additional instruments would already have been present in the choir-loft.   They were played between the Epistle and Gospel, since in Mozart's day the liturgical Propers of the Mass were seldom (if ever) sung.   One of the Biggs collections from Mercury Music has the slow one in E Flat Major arranged as an organ trio, I think. Isn't there an arrangement of = the piece for glass harmonica as well? That may call for strings, though ...   I can't think of any others offhand that would be playable by an organist WITHOUT instruments ... they're little gems, though. We used to play them all the time at Old St. Mary's, for preludes and postludes when we sang Mozart Masses with chamber orchestra.   > I am familiar with the 3 sonatas supposedly written for musical clock, > particularly the Fantaisie in f minor which I dearly love (K. 608 or 609 > or something, but who's counting?). But I was looking for something > appropriate for church, and appreciate your help. > > Glenda Sutton >   It's one of the great griefs of music history that Mozart and Beethoven never wrote down any of their organ improvisations, but improvisation was the custom of Catholic organists of their day, as it still is in France to this day.   Cheers,   Bud