PipeChat Digest #2622 - Thursday, January 3, 2002
 
Theatre consoles - was Francis Booth, Organ Builder
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Wellington Cathedral yet again, & Audsley Cornopean quotes
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: bits & pieces - resultants
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Nigel Potts
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: bits & pieces - resultants
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
Re: "overblowing" or harmonic pipes
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Shocking Facts
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE: Shocking Facts
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Songle, Doppel, Tropple
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Songle, Doppel, Tropple
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
The Rector From Hell (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: The Rector From Hell (X-posted)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Theatre consoles - was Francis Booth, Organ Builder From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 15:29:18 -0000   Bruce,   Gee, thanks for your kind remarks. One or two were my playing, some were music OCR'd from a sheet, and some manually written into a notation programme. I have always found the knack of getting a really good = recording rather elusive. I think my organs (even though they are built and voiced = in software) sound better 'in the flesh'.   Re theatre consoles - size of. Reasons vary. The all-electric Compton consoles were plain and fairly compact, in a theatre most often visually enlarged by an internally illuminated surround purely for effect. Wurlitzer consoles were usually a bit larger - the stop action is = pneumatic but still fairly compact. they went in more for massive wooden fancy gold and white painted confections, at least in later years. But it's = impossible to generalise - you will find Wurlitzers with illuminated surrounds and Comptons got up to look like Wurlitzers, and shy Wurlitzers in discreet polished mahogany, and Bartons and Christies. There are loads of pictures = on the web. The usual arrangement is for the main relays (ie those that translate the stop+key information into which pipe to sound info) to be elsewhere, but with the combination action relays and setters to be in the console. This = is of course 'as built' - in these days of solid state relays who knows.   Regards   Bruce Miles         mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk ----- Original Message ----- From: <Cremona502@cs.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 9:49 PM Subject: Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder     > Bruce, > I really enjoyed visiting your webpage. The organs are very = interesting > and the sound clips (especially theatre ones!) were excellent. Your > playing??? > > I was just wondering..... why we some theatre organ consoles so big? Was > it just for effect, or was it full of relays and other unificagoodies?? > Thanks. > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains > Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Wellington Cathedral yet again, & Audsley Cornopean quotes From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 16:18:07 -0000   Hi Ross and Linda and all,   The mistery (to me at least) of my allegedly misquoting Audsley is solved. = I was quoting from the 1905 edition (as reprinted by Dover 1965). By 1921 he had, it seems, revised his views. I can only say that for me the ideal Cornopean is more sociable than the term 'brassy' would indicate. I have always regarded the term 'brassy' as being more or less synonymous with 'trumpet toned' - perhaps I should revise that view. The reference to the stop 'being of the closed variety' is inexplicable, unless he meant 'close toned' which to me means of limited harmonic development, which does not square with 'brassy'.   We certainly do need to be practical in our definitions, and that includes recognising that they must in the nature of things be subjective and somewhat flexible. No need to duck - I don't throw things. !!   When my new knee joint has bedded down I will listen to my 1859 Cornopean with renewed interest.   Regards   Bruce Miles     mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: <Pipechat@Pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 2:46 AM Subject: Wellington Cathedral yet again, & other things     > I've just looked up my 1921 Audsley and he does indeed mention the Cornopean > as being ideally a cross between a Trumpet, French (notice the = adjective) > Horn and a Cornet a Pistons, but admits that the stop rarely attains to > that. In other words, what you hear is not what he considers ideal. By = the > way, some writers have spoken on this List of the "Horn" character of = the > Cornopean, but Audsley does not mention that - the Horn is very = different > indeed from the French Horn, the former being much used, the latter only > incredibly rarely. Even in the orchestra, whose instruments Audsley was > referring to, the Horn is quite different from the French Horn, usually > referring surely to something from the brass division and not from the > woodwind where a French Horn is placed. > He also speaks of the stop being of the closed variety and I presume he > means it has a pierced lid on the top of the resonator. To be honest, = I've > inspected heaps of Cornopeans and never found one yet with a lid on it, and > never one with even a trace of French Horn tone. > So, notwithstanding those who wish to decry my definition of the tone, I'll > stand by it, and not stand by a theoretical fellow who admits his ideas are > not much achieved in regard to this stop. At least a dozen British > organbuilders have told me directly that the definition as a brassy stop > that is thin in chords yet solid as a solo is in fact a good definition, > taking it away from the Trumpet tone to the brassy. The stop will inevitably > sound raucous, also, in a small dead wooden church seating about 75 to = 180 > when the organ has perhaps only a dozen simple stops, no upper work, and no > other reed. > We need to be practical in our definitions, and not misquote = theoretician > writers. (Should I duck for cover on this last sentence?) > Regards, > Ross > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: bits & pieces - resultants From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 16:21:16 -0000   Hello all,   On the subject of the 32 ft stops and resultants you might like to lend an eye/ear to the homily and demo on my web site - Miscellaneous page. This shows just how effective a quint can be (you will need speakers which will respond down to 16ft bottom C - 32 hz). The problem with 32 ft sub-bourdons and such, is that the human ear just does not respond to low level very low frequency sounds. = The only good one I have 'heard' is the Compton Accoustic Cube at Broadcasting House, London and that communicates by just gently shaking the floor.!   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk       ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: <Pipechat@Pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2002 6:51 AM Subject: bits & pieces     > Dear List, > I know of no aluminium [correct spelling for Britain, Australia and NZ] > pipes at all in New Zealand, and saw none in Britain. Zinc pipes are not > only a lot cheaper and stiffer than metal or tin, but are also lighter = so > need less support. I don't think there's really all that much advantage = in > having anything else below about GG pitch or maybe CC, and I've seen > stunningly good zinc pipes even as high as 2ft Middle C, though rarely. > Strings need more tin than Principals. > 32fts are no use at all unless the hearers are going to be at least the > standing-wave distance from the pipes, i.e. about 40ft or so. I think a good > 16ft full-length reed is better than most 32ft half-length reeds, so = don't > go that way, especially don't try the fractional-length reeds with = wooden > resonators. You might compare costs of a 3rk or 4rk Harmonics stop to > achieve something of the same result - e.g. (10.12.b14.15) or even just = a 10 > 2/3 and 6 2/5 in flues if you have good 8fts and 4fts on the Pedal already. > Bourdons, i.e. stopt 32fts, need to be of massive scale to be effective, > i.e. about 28" or even up to 36" square at CCCC. You can't, in other words, > get a 2nd-hand Open Wood of, say, 16 to 20" square and stopper it - it won't > work. > I'd have rather have, all the same, a flue than a reed, but any 32ft = stop is > diabolically expensive of space, money and wind. > Resultants can be phenomenally successful, even if you don't have > independent quints. Wellington Cathedral used to use its 16ft wood = SubBass > at suboctave pitch to TenC, then play the Quint. The thing shook the = floor > and was infinitely more effective than the almost-useless stoppered old 16ft > wood they have there now. > Double-mouthed pipes. Both of you are right. When made of metal, the mouths > are adjacent, as has been said, at right-angles. When of wood, the = mouths > are on opposite sides of the pipe. The things are very hard to voice and are > a singular waste of money. They also are hard to plant: it's easy to = avoid > mouth-shading with one mouth, but almost impossible with two. > 'Nuff of me till next time. > Regards, > Ross > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 16:22:16 -0000   Hello Bruce,   I believe sliderless, or ventil, windchests are unusual, although perhaps not really rare. I doubt if there are many used in conjunction with = tracker action.   If you have Audsley (1905), see Chapter XXVII and Fig CLXXXVIII (eek !!)). If not read on.   (Details are for the 1859 Francis Booth organ at Market Weighton). Each draw knob controls a ventil which admits wind to a longintudinal channel above which is planted a rank of pipes. For each note a wire, spring = loaded at one end, runs from from front to back through the chest (ie through all the windchannels). Each wire carries a disc valve for each note, so that when the wire is pulled by the key action all the disc valves for that = note open and if the wind channel for that stop is charged, air passes through = a conventional set of drillings to the pipe, and the note sounds . When the key is released the spring returns the wire to rest and all the valves close. There is an exhaust valve for each stop so that when the draw knob = is pushed in, the wind channel is immediately exhausted. Access for = maintenance is easy via removeable panels under the chest and the system has proved extremely reliable - no major overhaul for 142 years !! - at least so far = as we been able to discover. The only problem has been that the small leather puffs which seal the points where the wires enter each wind channel fail after about 60 years. So we have a rolling programme of renewing a hundred or so at each annual tune.   Yes, I did say annual tune. Thats all it needs. And at the last visit our organ builder decided it hardly needed a full retune so just touched a few reeds and spent the time doing other things.   The main bellows have been patched many many times and must be = re-leathered before too long, but that's money which is, as ever, in short supply. So, its fingers crossed on that one.   It would be interesting to know if Francis Booth built any other = sliderless organs.   Regards to all,   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk ----- Original Message ----- From: <Cremona502@cs.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 9:12 PM Subject: Re: Francis Booth, Organ Builder     > In a message dated 1/2/02 11:30:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, > bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk writes: > > > > The organ is unusual in that it has sliderless chests, perhaps it was = a 'one > > off' experimental job. > > Can you elaborate on the "sliderless" chests. Sounds interesting. > > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains > Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Nigel Potts From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 11:16:10 -0500   Dear Ross, > I've known Nigel's mother, a most capable piano teacher, > for over 40 years, and his father for about 30. Too, I know Nigel to be = a > most unassuming, likeable young fellow.   If you have opportunity to do so, kindly do pass along to Nigel's parents my admiration for their son. He was a house guest with us dring = the time here to prepare and present his recital -- and a gentleman in every regard.   I hope to follow his career over the years, wherever he works.   By the way: I'm just curious: do I recall seeing somewhere that you are a clergyman? What is your calling, what church, and what do you do, = if other than regular parish ministry?   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: RE: bits & pieces - resultants From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 13:58:17 -0500   Hey, Bruce! FASCINATING (to put it mildly). No, my speakers couldn't handle it, but it was interesting anyway.   Alan St. Luke's, New York City   -----Original Message----- From: Bruce Miles [mailto:bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk]=20 Subject: Re: bits & pieces - resultants   Hello all,   On the subject of the 32 ft stops and resultants=20    
(back) Subject: Re: "overblowing" or harmonic pipes From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 15:35:45 EST     --part1_107.ac78014.29661aa1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Thanks, Sebastian. Your response and shared knowledge are greatly appreciated. I have missed your "ground zero" reports and hope that = things are going well. All of ground zero folks are still in our prayers.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_107.ac78014.29661aa1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Thanks, Sebastian. = &nbsp;Your response and shared knowledge are greatly appreciated. &nbsp;I = have missed your "ground zero" reports and hope that things are going = well. &nbsp;&nbsp;All of ground zero folks are still in our prayers. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_107.ac78014.29661aa1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Shocking Facts From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 15:43:29 EST     --part1_5b.20b62e9c.29661c71_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/2/02 11:12:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@prodigy.net writes:     > I've seen something like you're describing (Doppelflute), but they were > opposite...one on each side, front and back. Or is this what you meant = by > "adjacent"?   By adjacent, I mean "side-by-side." The Doppelflute (wood) has a = mouth on each side (back to back). I will continue looking for the picture.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_5b.20b62e9c.29661c71_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/2/02 11:12:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@prodigy.net writes: <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#0000ff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">I've seen something like you're describing (Doppelflute), but they = were opposite...one on each side, front and back. &nbsp;Or is this what = you meant by "adjacent"? &nbsp;Just confused a little here.</BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>By adjacent, I mean "side-by-side." &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The = Doppelflute (wood) has a mouth on each side (back to back). = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I will continue looking for the picture. <BR> <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_5b.20b62e9c.29661c71_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Shocking Facts From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 16:00:05 -0500   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C19499.9EBD0760 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   I take it to mean like one would be where one's mouth is and the other = where one of one's ears is just a bit lower. To me that's adjacent and when I = read this earlier I thought, well Colasacco you haven't seen most pipes so = maybe it is that way even though it seems odd to you. But I have seen the = drawing of a double mouthed pipe and I don't remember which voice it was but the mouths were on opposite sides of each other, i.e., one where one's mouth = is and the other where the madulla oblongata would be, at the back of the = head.   Robert Colasacco -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com] Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2002 3:43 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Shocking Facts     In a message dated 1/2/02 11:12:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@prodigy.net writes:         I've seen something like you're describing (Doppelflute), but they were opposite...one on each side, front and back. Or is this what you meant by "adjacent"? Just confused a little here.       By adjacent, I mean "side-by-side." The Doppelflute (wood) has a = mouth on each side (back to back). I will continue looking for the picture.   Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C19499.9EBD0760 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4912.300" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><SPAN class=3D380235620-03012002><FONT face=3DGaramond = color=3D#800000>I take it to mean like one would be where one's mouth is and the other where one of = one's ears is just a bit lower. To me that's adjacent and when I read this = earlier I thought, well Colasacco you haven't seen most pipes so maybe it is that = way even though it seems odd to you. But I have seen the drawing of a double = mouthed pipe and I don't remember which voice it was but the mouths were on opposite = sides of each other, i.e., one where one's mouth is and the other where the madulla =   oblongata would be, at the back of the head. </FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D380235620-03012002><FONT face=3DGaramond = color=3D#800000>Robert Colasacco</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV class=3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3Dltr align=3Dleft><FONT = face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Cremona502@cs.com [mailto:Cremona502@cs.com]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, January 03, 2002 3:43 =   PM<BR><B>To:</B> pipechat@pipechat.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> Re: Shocking Facts<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D2>In a = message dated 1/2/02 11:12:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@prodigy.net = writes: <BR><BR><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"> <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px = solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" TYPE=3D"CITE">I've seen something like you're describing (Doppelflute), = but they were opposite...one on each side, front and back. &nbsp;Or is this what = you meant by "adjacent"? &nbsp;Just confused a little here.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT lang=3D0 face=3DArial color=3D#000000 = size=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF"><BR>By adjacent, I mean "side-by-side." &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The Doppelflute (wood) has a mouth on each = side (back to back). &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I will continue looking for the picture. =   <BR><BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com = &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT> </FONT></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C19499.9EBD0760--  
(back) Subject: Re: Songle, Doppel, Tropple From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 15:59:50 EST     --part1_17c.1a88144.29662046_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/3/02 12:07:26 AM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > Double mouthed pipes of dual tonality (ala > Ludwigtonen), or DOUBLE-LANGUID stops such as the high pressure = diapasons > of > the 1920s? These are very different questions, they all seem to be = jumbled > back and forth... >   Do you have time to unjumble??? Thanky. Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains Please visit Howling Acres at http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/   --part1_17c.1a88144.29662046_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/3/02 12:07:26 AM Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Double mouthed = pipes of dual tonality (ala <BR>Ludwigtonen), or DOUBLE-LANGUID stops such as the high pressure = diapasons of <BR>the 1920s? These are very different questions, they all seem to be = jumbled <BR>back and forth... <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Do you have time to unjumble??? &nbsp;Thanky. <BR>Bruce Cornely &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;~ &nbsp;Cremona502@cs.com &nbsp; <BR>with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" <BR>Duncan, Miles, Molly &amp; Dewi = &nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains <BR>Please visit Howling Acres at = &nbsp;&nbsp;http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ <BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_17c.1a88144.29662046_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Songle, Doppel, Tropple From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 13:29:35 -0800 (PST)       I've seen drawings of double-mouthed pipes in Audsley's dictionary of organ stops, but the only one I've ever seen was the familiar Doppleflote.   As for double languids, we never used any when I was at Aeolian-Skinner since we never built any extremely high pressure and large scaled pipework for places like the Atlantic City Auditorium, or for stadiums, so I'm not familiar with those either. That would be an enormously expensive way to make pipes, assuming you could find anyone who would willing to make them in the first place.   D. Keith Morgan     --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > In a message dated 1/3/02 12:07:26 AM Eastern > Standard Time, > TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > > > > Double mouthed pipes of dual tonality (ala > > Ludwigtonen), or DOUBLE-LANGUID stops such as the > high pressure diapasons > > of > > the 1920s? These are very different questions, > they all seem to be jumbled > > back and forth... > > > > Do you have time to unjumble??? Thanky. > Bruce Cornely ~ Cremona502@cs.com > with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ > ""Haruffaroo, Bohawow!" > Duncan, Miles, Molly & Dewi > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/baskerbargains > Please visit Howling Acres at > http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/ > >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Send your FREE holiday greetings online! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: The Rector From Hell (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 13:43:39 -0800   Well, HE'S BACK, and he shot down EVERY SINGLE piece of work I did while he was gone (Epiphany thru Quinquagesima), PLUS Candlemas, PLUS the 11:00 choir, which I had volunteers for.   I give up. But he's going to have to FIRE me, AND explain to the congregation WHY.   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: The Rector From Hell (X-posted) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 16:52:52 EST     --part1_e4.2076badb.29662cb4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 1/3/02 4:52:06 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:     > Well, HE'S BACK, and he shot down EVERY SINGLE piece of work I did while > he was gone (Epiphany thru Quinquagesima), PLUS Candlemas, PLUS the > 11:00 choir, which I had volunteers for.   Um, why?   --part1_e4.2076badb.29662cb4_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 1/3/02 4:52:06 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Well, HE'S BACK, = and he shot down EVERY SINGLE piece of work I did while<BR> he was gone (Epiphany thru Quinquagesima), PLUS Candlemas, PLUS the<BR> 11:00 choir, which I had volunteers for.</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Um, why?</FONT></HTML>   --part1_e4.2076badb.29662cb4_boundary--