PipeChat Digest #2651 - Sunday, January 13, 2002
 
Honorariums
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #2648 - 01/12/02
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
copyrighted materials
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: copyrighted materials
  by "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net>
going to the cemetery with the music
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: going to the cemetery with the music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: going to the cemetery with the music
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: going to the cemetery with the music
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: going to the cemetery with the music
  by "Paul Austin" <paul-austin@ntlworld.com>
Re: copyrighted materials
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
not a good morning By The Shopping Center (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: going to the cemetery with the music
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Choral suggestions?
  by "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.c
Re: Choral suggestions?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
1A Epiphany at you-know-where
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
 

(back) Subject: Honorariums From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 07:02:51 EST   >On the odd occasion >a grateful family have offered him money by way of a thankyou, he always >politely refuses and tells them that they are very welcome to place the >money into the collection plate. He reckons its more than his career is >worth to accept money!! A bottle of whiskey on the other = hand...........:-)   >Paul.     When I am making funeral arrangements with a family(members of the church where the service is to be held), and the issue of fess/honorariums is = asked, I usually suggest that they send their pastor or musican a note of thanks = for the service and that instead of money, they give a gift certificate to a restaurant or a book store, and in the case of musicians, a gift = certificate from Brodt Music Company. As a musician, I always thought something like that showed a little more thought and gratitude than just writing a check = or stuffing a couple of bills in a card.     Monty    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #2648 - 01/12/02 From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 07:11:47 EST     Bud wrote: >Organists ... now that's another matter. IF the service takes place in >the parish church, and IF the organist is FULL-TIME, that's one thing. >But if the organist is part-time, and has to go to the funeral home, or >haul an electronic keyboard to the top of a mountain at sunrise or to >the beach at sunset to play for a wedding, then the organist has every >right to demand payment UP FRONT. I've been stiffed more than once in >those situations ... that's why I don't play those gigs anymore. The >money wasn't worth the hassle.     Bud I agree with you. I have made funeral arrangements with families = many, many times who wanted keyboard music at the graveside service. I always suggested that they have a singer sing a capella or a flautist, violinist, =   etc. play. Once it is explained to them that it's not pratical to haul a piano or organ to a cemetery, they will go along with it. However, most funeral directors are not degreed church musicians, so they have no clue. = I know of a handful of other organist.funeral directors, and I would guess = that they probably would steer people in the same direction as I do. When I = had to arrange for an organist to come to the funeral home to play, I always = make it worth their effort to do so. I usually put an envelope on the music = rack (with the check in it and a note of thanks for playing) so it is there = before the organist gets there. AFter the service is over, there is usually too much going on to remember to give all the checks out and then I know that = the organist got it and won't be calling me every day asking for the check I forgot to give them.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: copyrighted materials From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 07:48:40 -0600   Good Morning:   In the church where I previously served for 32 years, the present pastor pays a license fee and copies many pieces of music for services.   One of the selections he often reproduces uses a tune from "The Sound of Music" and a text beginning "May the Lord....etc.". I was under the = belief that the R & H library is not covered by these blanket licenses.   I am a member, but no longer serving this congregation, I do not wish the church to be sued for violation of copyright.   Does anyone on Pipechat know if the R & H library is covered by the = blanket fees?   Sincerely,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Re: copyrighted materials From: "Mike Swaldo" <mswal@adelphia.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 09:06:14 -0800   Hi,   In general, if something is not covered by the license, it is stated right on the music ("This music is not covered by...").   > Does anyone on Pipechat know if the R & H library is covered by the blanket > fees?   I very much doubt that they are. R and H are really funny about copyrights-- right up there with Disney. When I was working in = professional theatre, we did a production of "Oklahoma!." We had to pay a ton of money to to R and H to get permission to have an orchestra record the parts, and have them all mixed. It made a wonderful job, but part of the agreement = was that we had to send the tape to R and H when we sent back the scores. In the next catalogue from them, guess what they offer as a rental option? That's right, our tape!! That's been aboput 10 years ago or more, but recently I was telling the music teacher at our school about it, and she said that with "Oklahoma!" you still get the option to rent a fully orchestrated accompaniment tape.   Best wishes, Mike          
(back) Subject: going to the cemetery with the music From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 06:33:32 -0800     Monty wrote:   > I have made funeral arrangements with families many, > many times who wanted keyboard music at the graveside service. I always > suggested that they have a singer sing a capella or a flautist, = violinist, > etc. play.   If the burial is at the local cemetery, which is about five minutes from = our new church, I imagine the choir and I WILL go (with keyboard) and sing the = Committal Service there, rather than "in the shelter of the Church", as is allowed = "for weighty cause" as we've been doing, "weighty cause" being that it was too = far to go from our temporary church. In the old days, of course, when the = graveyard was right next to the church, the choirs invariably went.   After I used the keyboard for the ground-breaking service for the new = church, the Rector said, "well, can you do that for funerals?" Sadly, the first time = we did it was for the little girl who drowned last Fall ... that would have been = a DREADFULLY depressing graveside service without music. The family told us afterwards what a comfort it was to have the service sung.   But ours is something of a special situation ... we chant the entire = Anglican funeral rites -- Burial Office, Requiem, Absolutions, and Committal = Service -- and the full choir is always present at funerals. The Committal Service is = a fair "chunk" of music -- the Sentences ("Man That Is Born of a Woman"), the = Anthem ("I Heard A Voice From Heaven") and the Contakion ("Give Rest, O Christ") at = the very least, plus a hymn or the Ego Sum ("I Am The Resurrection") and the = Benedictus at the end as the congregation is leaving.   My choir is reasonably strong, and they know the music well ... I suppose eventually we could do it unaccompanied ... but at the last one, a fair = amount of "filler" music was needed while the large congregation filed past to cast = earth on the coffin in the grave ... it was good to have the keyboard there so I = could play hymns.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: going to the cemetery with the music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 08:45:02 -0600   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > After I used the keyboard for the ground-breaking service for the new = church, the > Rector said, "well, can you do that for funerals?"   Sounds like an excellent reason for getting a portatif pipe organ. Does anyone on the list have one that they use for such purposes?   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: going to the cemetery with the music From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 06:57:55 -0800   That's a thought ... but it would need an 8' stopped flute going down to = low F or G (at least) to support the choir, as I think through the ranges of the = polyphony pieces, and a 4' chimney flute and a 2' principal, or at least a 4' principal, for = hymns. I suppose a portable version COULD be built, with foot-operated feeders, but = it would be a bit larger and heavier than a table-top portative.   The electronic keyboard carries pretty well, and it's battery-operated; = the sampled "reed organ" (for soft things) and "pipe organ" (for loud things) are = tolerable. We were lucky at that first one we did ... the burial was in the cloister of = the mausoleum, and we were backed by one of the exterior marble walls, so the = sound of the choir and "organ" went RINGING around the cloister.   Cheers,   Bud   "John L. Speller" wrote:   > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > After I used the keyboard for the ground-breaking service for the new = church, the > > Rector said, "well, can you do that for funerals?" > > Sounds like an excellent reason for getting a portatif pipe > organ. Does anyone on the list have one that they use for > such purposes? > > John Speller > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: going to the cemetery with the music From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 10:18:19 -0500       "John L. Speller" wrote:   > quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > After I used the keyboard for the ground-breaking service for the new = church, the > > Rector said, "well, can you do that for funerals?" > > Sounds like an excellent reason for getting a portatif pipe > organ. Does anyone on the list have one that they use for > such purposes? > > John Speller >   Hi John, I always thought pipe organs were too sensitive to be hauled = around unless you planned to retune every time it was set up. Certainly a battery powered = blower would not be a problem and the pipework could be secured to prevent pipes from = jumping from their toe holes. Perhaps an all wood, all flue pipe organ along the lines = of an Estey with DE action might be practical when mounted in the rear of a Cadillac = flower truck to provide a certain measure of class and dignity.   Mike Gettelman (who dreams of 50 ranks or so inside a semi trailer)      
(back) Subject: Re: going to the cemetery with the music From: "Paul Austin" <paul-austin@ntlworld.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 15:27:26 -0000       Our local organ builders offer a service where by you can hire a small continuo organ for such occasions. As Mike said, the pipes are secured = in such a way that they are unable to leave the soundboard whilst being moved around. When the organ arrives at the desired location it is simply unfolded, tuned, which isn't a huge job as they only have 3 or 4 stops, normally Open Diapason 8', Flute, 8', Octave or Principal 4' and a = Fifteenth 2'. Although small, ideal for such occasions!   Paul.   > Hi John, > I always thought pipe organs were too sensitive to be hauled around unless you > planned to retune every time it was set up. Certainly a battery powered blower would > not be a problem and the pipework could be secured to prevent pipes from jumping from > their toe holes. Perhaps an all wood, all flue pipe organ along the = lines of an Estey > with DE action might be practical when mounted in the rear of a Cadillac flower truck > to provide a certain measure of class and dignity. > > Mike Gettelman (who dreams of 50 ranks or so inside a semi trailer) > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: copyrighted materials From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 09:41:45 -0600       Patricia/Thomas Gregory wrote:   > Good Morning: > > In the church where I previously served for 32 years, the present pastor > pays a license fee and copies many pieces of music for services. > > One of the selections he often reproduces uses a tune from "The Sound of > Music" and a text beginning "May the Lord....etc.". I was under the = belief > that the R & H library is not covered by these blanket licenses.   The pairing of the text "May the Lord..." with Edelweiss was quite a = popular pairing ten or fifteen years ago, to the extent that when the PCUSA = prepared their new hymnal in 1990, they wanted to include the combination. R & H = would not give permission. Consequently, the Presbyterian Hymnal of contains = the text at #596, set to a tune of Chinese origin called "Wen-Ti" with the = exact same meter as Edelweiss. If the organist / pianist plays from a legitimate copy of Edelweiss, (which R & H cannot prevent, as there is no = way to in the U.S. to prevent use of music in worship service), the the congregation can simply sing the text from hymn number 596.... Wen-Ti is = a nice tune; I personally have my doubts, though, as to whether it would be = in the hymnal if R & H would have allowed "Edelweiss".   ns      
(back) Subject: not a good morning By The Shopping Center (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 13:32:02 -0800   (1) the toaster refused to play AT all at the High Mass; the Great had already ceased to function at the early Mass.   (2) the tenor section leader neglected to tell me he had to coach a hockey game (on Sunday MORNING?) and wouldn't be there.   (3) the bass section leader was out of town. The other two basses simply didn't show up ... no call, no explanation ... VERY unusual for them.   (4) the mezzo soloist had to babysit her grand-niece.   (5) TRFH was FURIOUS because there were no anthems. Gee, coach, I can't CONJURE singers. Wanna try PAYING some?!   The chant sounded LOVELY on our old, out-of-tune Acrosonic Spinet piano (NOT!). Ever tried to lead Scottish Chant on the piano with a FULL church? INteresting ... (grin). They were all over the lot ... the back half stayed with me; the front half didn't.   As regards the organ, I'd say there's a measure of Karmic Justice in the Universe ... they essentially scrapped the pipe organ project last Tuesday; by the end of the week I'd told 'em it'd take $8K to "refurbish" the toaster so we could use it in the new church.   Of course, TRFH will accuse me of doing it on purpose because there was a Vestry meeting after High Mass today (grin).   Cheers,   Bud, who despairs of EVER playing a RELIABLE organ of ANY sort again, digitoid OR pipe    
(back) Subject: Re: going to the cemetery with the music From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 17:05:02 -0500   You haven't quite "lived" until you've attended a Pa. Dutch funeral = and burial in a "plain" church - Mennonite, Church of the Brethren, etc., - and particpated in singing "Asleep In Jesus" _a cappella_ in four-part harmony standing around the grave.   I don't know if this actually continues now or not. It was a mid-20th-century practice.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Choral suggestions? From: "BridgewaterUMC Director of Music" <bridgewatermusic@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 20:02:50 -0500     Hello all!   Im spending the evening thinking about music for Lent and Holy week. I = was wondering if anyone might make some suggestions. I have a decent library, =   and a choir of 45 that can do anything. However, Im looking for something = a little above the usual "new lenten" anthem. I know that I know lots of choral music, but for some reason cant seem to come up with any ideas. = Any thoughts?   Keep us in your prayers this week. We begin the preperations for our new organ. New chambers are being built and most of the wireing will be done = by the weeks end. Quite exciting!   Peace!   Craig     _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.    
(back) Subject: Re: Choral suggestions? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 17:29:19 -0800   Don't everybody gag at once, but I LOVE Will James' "Jesus, Our Lord, We = Adore Thee" (G. Schirmer, SSAATTBB) ... the eight-part divisi isn't hard. I may = do it this Good Friday during Communion.   Bach "Crucifixus" (b minor Mass)   Bruckner "Christus factus est" (Peters, probably)   Kenneth Leighton "Solus ad victimae" (Oxford) - only the title is Latin; = the text is English   T. Tertius Noble "Fierce Was The Wild Billow" (out of print?)   T. Tertius Noble "Go To Dark Gethsemane" (H. W. Gray)   If you can locate a copy of Charles Wood's "Passion According to St. Luke" = (?), I think it is, there are some WONDERFUL things that can be excerpted, particularly the Institution Narrative for Maundy Thursday ... I think it = was Faith Press ... it's LONG out of print.   There is a GOUNOD "Seven Last Words" (Novello) ... a cappella ... the last chorus goes into eight parts ... it's GORGEOUS, if you can find it. I = think Novello has "reprint on demand." If not, I probably should make a new = edition of it ... I think I still have it around here somewhere.   Cheers,   Bud           BridgewaterUMC Director of Music wrote:   > Hello all! > > Im spending the evening thinking about music for Lent and Holy week. I = was > wondering if anyone might make some suggestions. I have a decent = library, > and a choir of 45 that can do anything. However, Im looking for = something a > little above the usual "new lenten" anthem. I know that I know lots of > choral music, but for some reason cant seem to come up with any ideas. = Any > thoughts? > > Keep us in your prayers this week. We begin the preperations for our = new > organ. New chambers are being built and most of the wireing will be = done by > the weeks end. Quite exciting! > > Peace! > > Craig > > _________________________________________________________________ > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: 1A Epiphany at you-know-where From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 19:39:57 -0600   St. Agatha's Episcopal Church DeFuniak Springs, Florida   1 Epiphany, Year A   Prelude: Andante cantabile (X 2), K. 15o and 15q from Aus dem Londoner Skizzenbuch Veroneser Allegro, KV 72a Air from Eine klein nachtmusik - W. A. Mozart (1756 - 1791) Processional Hymn: Hail to the Lord's Anointed (Es flog ein kleins Waldvogelein) - H 616 Sequence Hymn: O love, how deep, how (Deus tuorum militum) - H 448 Offertory Hymn: Spirit divine, attend our (Nun danket all und bringet Ehr) - H 509 Music during Communion: Shall we gather at the river - Aaron Copland Come with us, O blessed Jesus (Werde munter; text H 336) Closing Hymn: Christ is the world's true Light (St. Joan) - H 542 Dismissal Postlude: Fugue (Little) in G minor (BWV 578) - J. S. Bach   No one paid much attention to the Mozart ditties (what a shame, because they're going to have to hear Mozart sonatas next week, but maybe on the piano), but the postlude always is a crowd pleaser. We had a good crowd, with lots of visitors. What started out as a foggy and miserable morning broke forth as a beauteous, albeit chilly, day.   What a long and immensely satisfying experience! How I've longed to say those words in another context. This afternoon St. Agatha's Lakeside Concert Series hosted the Hachidori Trio in concert, a return engagement. The program:   THE HACHIDORI TRIO:   JENNIFER DALMAS, violin EVGENI RAYCHEV, cello KARLA QUALLES, piano   Bergerettes - Bohuslav Martinu (1890-1959) I. Poco allegro   II. Allegro con brio III. Andantino IV. Allegro V. Moderato   Passacaglia: Duo for Violin and Cello - Johan Halvorsen (1864-1935) after George F. Handel's Suite No. 7 in G minor for Harpsichord   Trio in G minor, Opus 15 - Bedrich Smetana (1824-1884) Moderato assai Allegro, ma non agitato Finale: Presto   We packed the house - over 90 people and counting - and the trio did not disappoint. The Smetana was chocolate gold, a fabulous experience (probably as good as sex, or Godiva White Chocolate Raspberry ice cream, WHICH I DO NOT GET ANYMORE BECAUSE WINN DIXIE STOCKS ALL THE FLAVORS BUT THAT ONE!). Sorry - I went to the Bahamas for a minute. (Actually, I know that Wal-Mart is reading my posts, because Gouda cheese showed up the week after I lamented the lack of Gouda cheese on this list. We're just checking to see if there are spies for Winn Dixie on this list.)   The whole program was wonderful, and the acoustics of this tiny church just allow the music to wash over you in glorious color. And then a Southern reception to end all receptions - what delectable goodies! I didn't get to eat for the crowd all gushing to me about the recital.   When I announced a tentative engagement for Felix Hell in December, that got lots of attention and comments - everyone was very excited. One parishioner told me that she'd give me $100 if I'd allow the pews to be reversed for the recital. I told her no, but for $500, I might consider it. Hey, everyone has their price. Like the story of the beautiful woman sitting at the bar, and the man next to her asked her if she would have sex with him for $1 million. She thought a minute, and said, "Sure." Then he asked if she'd do it for $10. She responded, "What do you think I am - a whore?" He replied, "I thought we already established that - we're just haggling over the price now." Now the fundraising begins in earnest - gotta wine and dine a few moneyed friends and acquaintances.   In fact, the "honey-do" list is pretty long right now, and the new job starts officially on Tuesday. I'm already doing it and the old one until then, and the new suit is still sitting in the closet. I feel like a peanut farmer on subsidy, and that they've been paying me for 6 years to not practice law. It's time to kick some legal butt, and the organ playing will just blossom as I vent my frustrations in the courtroom. Please, God, don't let it disappear this time - I've already moved into my new office.   It was very gratifying today that almost a dozen people asked me when I was going to play another recital. Of course, they probably wanted to know so that they could skip that one. I told one that my goal in life was for people to pay me NOT to play, and that when the series got really desperate for money I would consider doing another one.   Of course, a million little vignettes occur on days like today, but you'll just have to wait for the book (or like me, the movie on DVD).   Regards,   Glenda Sutton