PipeChat Digest #2656 - Tuesday, January 15, 2002
 
Concert Announcement (Chicago Area) (Crossposted)
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Moody Church fire in 1986
  by "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
RE: Moody Church
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Sacraments
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Organist fees
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: fees
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Moody Church
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Choral suggestions?
  by "Bruce  Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Vernon D. Gotwals, R.I.P.
  by "Richard Dostie" <rmdostie@hotmail.com>
RE: Choral suggestions?
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Moody Church
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Organist fees
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Sacraments
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Sacraments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Organist fees
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Organist fees
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Sacraments
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Seven Sacraments, at least!
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Seven Sacraments, at least!
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Sacraments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Sacraments
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Washing of the Feet
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Seven Sacraments, at least!
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Sacraments
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
Re: Organist fees
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
RE: Sacraments
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Concert Announcement (Chicago Area) (Crossposted) From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 07:17:58 -0600   This was sent to me by a friend who is not on the lists...   On Friday February 22, 2002 7:30 p.m. Trinity Lutheran Church will present Frederick Swann in a concert of dedication for their rebuild and enlarged Pipe/Digital Organ. Trinity Lutheran Church is located at 5106 N. LaCrosse = In Chicago,IL 60630 1 1/2 miles north of the GatewayTheatre. Exit the Kennedy Expressway at Lawrence, go east to Cicero turn left (north) on Cicero to Elston, turn left(west) one block. Church is on the north side of the = street.   To purchase tickets please mail your request with a check to Trinity Lutheran Church 5106 N. LaCrosse Chicago, Il 60630 Phone 1-773-545-7300 ADVANCE TICKETS $12.00 Adults $8.00 Students 12 and under free AT THE DOOR $15.00 Adults $8.00 Students 12 and under free.   Ticket request received after February 16th, will be held at will call at = the church. Submitted byMichael Jacklin   regards,   Jon    
(back) Subject: Moody Church fire in 1986 From: "DanielW Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 09:46:37 -0400   I Listen to the same show Songs in the Night I Am quite sure that he said this fire happened in 1986. he was telling what happened many years ago to make a point Danielwh    
(back) Subject: RE: Moody Church From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 11:57:50 -0500   Dan wrote:   >The Moody Church organ's lush strings and voxes are like none other! I fondly remember subbing/playing there several times while I was a student = at Moody Bible Institute in the mid-70s. My organ teacher was the curator for Moody Church, and it was fun to assist him on occasion at Moody Church and other Chicago area churches he serviced. > > Ah, then you would know-- is the organ a Reuter, as Tom wrote? I = thought > that it was a Moller. > >  
(back) Subject: Sacraments From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 12:17:59 -0500   >or funerals, to be a sacrament, as Roman Catholics (and some Anglicans) do.   Funerals a sacrament? Not according to any Anglicans I know-- I doubt for RCs either.   We say that every sacrament has an outward and visible sign, and an inward and spiritual grace. In the case of a funeral, what would these be (particularly the latter?)   Re the sacramental status of matrimony among Lutherans, I gather that the 16th century reformers could take the Roman Catholics to task for having come to claim that only marriages conducted by a priest were legitimate. While some of the other sacraments do require holy orders, matrimony does not-- the partners administer the sacrament to each other-- and the reformers were emphatic on that point. Perhaps denying that it is a sacrament at all was instrumental in that debate-- a need that has passed into history.   I find it amusing that nowadays some of the *most* Protestant bodies have not only forgotten that, but in effect take the opposite position when = they discuss whether to "allow" gay couples to marry.   Paul    
(back) Subject: RE: Organist fees From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 12:24:14 -0500   >During the 1920's a famous NYC organist got $10,000US or 6,660=A3 for a very high society wedding.=20   Really? Wow, those were the days.   Eat your heart out, Virgil. Wasn't his wedding fee a *mere* $1000?      
(back) Subject: RE: fees From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 12:27:52 -0500   >he insisted thereafter that the organist be paid as much as the florist.   Hmm. I wonder if such a consideration in the early 1600s was why Frescobaldi entitled his most famous book "Fiori musicali".    
(back) Subject: Moody Church From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 13:26:06 -0400   Does anyone here have the specs of the Moody Church Reuter Pipe Organ = that they could post for us? Yes Fortunatly the church was spared at that time, he did mention of the = longest while of cleaning and recleaning That church he mentioned cleaning the 4000 seats in it . Daniel    
(back) Subject: Re: Choral suggestions? From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 10:48:34 -0000   Greetings all,   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2002 8:24 PM     >CotI chose to cut out some of > the verse of some of the "long" hymns, but only cut down the time to = about 57 > minutes. My own personal opinion is that the value of the material lost far > outweighed the seven or eight minutes gained. One thing which helps = keep the > production from seeming quite as long as it is is that it contains five "hymns" > that the congregation sings along with the choir.   I do agree that cutting any part of Stainer's 'Crucifixion' is most undesireable. The hymns are an essential part of the whole - they elevate the congregation from being just an audience to being actual participants and really gets them involved.   'Crucifixion' is an institution here and is sung every year by countless small town and village choirs many with very limited resources and ability = - it is not only a great and enduring piece of devotional music, it is above all accessible.   Long may this Victorian gem continue in popularity.   Bruce Miles   mail to:- bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk website:- http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Vernon D. Gotwals, R.I.P. From: "Richard Dostie" <rmdostie@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 17:38:31 +0000   The Bangor (Maine) Daily News carries today the obituary for Vernon D. Gotwals, who died Saturday at the age of 77. The obituary notes his education at Drew University and Princeton, with intervening service in = the South Pacific in World War II, and goes on to recall that he served as Professor of Music and college organist at Smith College for 32 years beginning in 1952. He retired to Deer Isle, Maine in 1984 and served as organist at the Deer Isle and Sunset Congregational Churches, overseeing = the acquisition and installation of organs at both churches. (My memory is = that at least one of these instruments was an Organ Clearing House instrument, restored and installed by the Czezulniak (sp) et Dugal firm of Massachusetts.) Active in his community, he also served the Blue Hill Concert Association, the Bagaduce Music Lending Library and the Stonington =   Conservation Commission. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, and by three sons, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Gifts in his memory may be sent to he Carol & Vernon Gotwals Music Endowment Fund, c/o Deer Isle Congregational Church, PO Box 383, Stonington, ME 04681. --- Richard M. Dostie St. Thomas' Church Camden, Maine USA       _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx    
(back) Subject: RE: Choral suggestions? From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 12:49:00 -0500   Bud suggests:   >Kenneth Leighton "Solus ad victimae" (Oxford) - only the title is Latin; the text is English   Isn't that the cantata that ends with "Drop, drop, slow tears?" That is = a marvelous movement. It looks relatively easy to sing, too. Excellent suggestion.   Which reminds me of the other famous setting of that text, by Walton. For some reason the title of this anthem is "A Litany." He wrote it when he = was VERY young, still in his teens, maybe even still a chorister at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, and it remains one of his best and best-known works.   To add another suggestion to the list, effective but not very difficult, = how about "Lord, let me know mine end" by Maurice Greene. An unperceptive critic once castigated this anthem for its rhythmically monotonous accompaniment. Apparently he didn't realize that this was a deliberate = and masterful pictorial gesture on the composer's part, suggesting the inexorable passage of time like a clock ticking.    
(back) Subject: RE: Moody Church From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 12:30:48 -0600   At 11:57 AM 1/15/02 -0500, you wrote: > > Ah, then you would know-- is the organ a Reuter, as Tom wrote? I = thought > > that it was a Moller. The organ is a Reuter.   jch    
(back) Subject: Re: Organist fees From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 08:15:05 +1300   Take up golf instead of organplaying. Tiger Woods, in the New Zealand just = a quarter mile from my house here, for NZ$4,000,000 just for taking part. That's about NZ$13,800 per shot, good or bad. Woods did not win, most empathically did not, and then had the bad sportmanship not even to wait another half hour to congratulate the winner, an Australian. A New Zealand Maori fellow came second-equal. Mind you, the winner got only a tiny = piddly fee for his win compared with the obscenely over-paid Tiger Woods. And our New Zealander immediately gave away his entire prize money to charity. So, maybe don't take up golf after all :-) Ross -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 6:26 AM Subject: RE: Organist fees     >During the 1920's a famous NYC organist got $10,000US or 6,660=A3 for a very high society wedding.   Really? Wow, those were the days.   Eat your heart out, Virgil. Wasn't his wedding fee a *mere* $1000?       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 13:58:49 -0500   Dear Paul, According to my theological training (a Jesuit University, 18credits = in theology and 24 in Philosophy required) Extreme Unction (annointing of the dying) is considered the last of the seven Sacraments.Matrimony is considered a sacrament despite the fact that the couple marry each other = but are blessed by the priest. Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 12:17 PM Subject: Sacraments     > >or funerals, to be a > sacrament, as Roman Catholics (and some Anglicans) do. > > Funerals a sacrament? Not according to any Anglicans I know-- I doubt = for > RCs either. > > We say that every sacrament has an outward and visible sign, and an = inward > and spiritual grace. In the case of a funeral, what would these be > (particularly the latter?) > > Re the sacramental status of matrimony among Lutherans, I gather that = the > 16th century reformers could take the Roman Catholics to task for having > come to claim that only marriages conducted by a priest were legitimate. > While some of the other sacraments do require holy orders, matrimony = does > not-- the partners administer the sacrament to each other-- and the > reformers were emphatic on that point. Perhaps denying that it is a > sacrament at all was instrumental in that debate-- a need that has = passed > into history. > > I find it amusing that nowadays some of the *most* Protestant bodies = have > not only forgotten that, but in effect take the opposite position when they > discuss whether to "allow" gay couples to marry. > > Paul > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 14:31:45 EST   Dear Paul   A funeral is not a sacrament, The Eucharist received during the Mass is a Sacrament. Confession or sacrament of reconciliation is a sacrament. Baptism, Confirmation, Matrimony, Holy Orders, and annointing of the sick, formerly Extreme Unction are all Sacraments in the RC Church tradition, and I believe the Orthodox hold to those too. These Church traditions go back to the beginning of the Christian Faith. Christ instituted them all Himself, and that's good enough for me. These are distinct from = Sacramentals. Holy water and other devotionals are Sacramentals. There is much more richness to the Christian Faith if one would be open minded enough to look and investigate. The appreciation comes with true understanding of their value.   I hope that clears things up a bit,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist fees From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 14:45:40 EST   Hi Paul   The organist in question was Charles M. Courboin who received the $10,000US payment for the wedding, and the people he played for could easily afford it. They were multi-Billionaires the Astor's. This was according to the three articals in the TAO Sept. Oct. and Dec. 1996 on the life and carreer of Charles M. Courboin. What a career that was too. He began packing in 12,000 people for organ recitals in Antwerp Cathedral at the tender age of 16. Sound like sombody we know? Hmmmmm! A gift from God? Most likely! Marcel Dupre and Charles made the Wanamaker Organ what it is today, with devotion and large infusions of cash from John Wanamaker. The organ design was theirs, John Wanamaker thrilled by the genius of both men happily built the organ their way.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist fees From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:04:11 EST   The organ design was theirs, John Wanamaker thrilled by the genius of both men happily built the organ their way.   It's a pity the Wanamakers can't hear that organ today in all its glorious = current state. Every time I get up to Philadelphia it sounds better than = it did the last time, and Mr. Conte certainly knows how to put it through = its paces.  
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 09:53:54 +1300   Ron & List, With all due respect, and I mean this most sincerely, what you call a sacrament depends on who you are, as is belief that Christ instituted a particular thing as a sacrament. There is no evidence that Christ instituted marriage as a sacrament, for example - we are merely told that he was present at a wedding. In the same way, there is no evidence at all in the Scriptures for any rite of confirmation. There was baptism, and that was that. Where do you find evidence of Christ instituting confirmation? On the other hand, you could easily read the footwashing ceremony as the institution of a sacrament, seeing Christ gave us physically the example = of doing it and told us to do the same, yet no church at all, as far as I am aware, has ever done this as a sacrament. Do you know of any? Is it = perhaps because it is too earthy, and too humbling to those receiving it, and has = no suggestion of power-for-clergy in it? Possibly. I wonder this every Easter when celebrating it (yes, celebrating is the right word) with my parish on Maundy Thursday evening. A trouble I have is that the number "seven" is always a magic number, even now in the year AD 2002. Research has shown that if you ask any group of people their favourite number, the biggest number will choose seven over = any other number. And so we get seven days in a week, the seven seas, the seven colours in = the rainbow, the seven contintents, seven sacraments, seven orders of ordination, etc.etc.etc. I have no objection to this, but to say Christ instituted seven sacraments is stretching it too far: I think various = parts of the Church added things to make up the magical number. What do you think? Kind regards, Ross -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 8:32 AM Subject: Re: Sacraments     >Dear Paul > >A funeral is not a sacrament, The Eucharist received during the Mass is >a Sacrament. Confession or sacrament of reconciliation is a sacrament. >Baptism, Confirmation, Matrimony, Holy Orders, and annointing of the = sick, >formerly Extreme Unction are all Sacraments in the RC Church tradition, >and I believe the Orthodox hold to those too. These Church traditions go >back to the beginning of the Christian Faith. Christ instituted them all >Himself, and that's good enough for me. These are distinct from Sacramentals. >Holy water and other devotionals are Sacramentals. There is much more >richness to the Christian Faith if one would be open minded enough to = look >and investigate. The appreciation comes with true understanding of their >value. > >I hope that clears things up a bit, > >Ron Severin > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Seven Sacraments, at least! From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:53:25 -0500   Dear Sacrachat-L,   Actually, in all your long list of groups of seven things, you neglected = the Seven Dwarfs, clearly an oversight.   My proof of the existence of seven Sacraments is that for years in many Episcopal churches here, the coffee hour has been referred to as the = "Eighth Sacrament." Surely this is proof positive that there are at least seven others!   Malcolm Wechsler L.A.O.D. , Inc.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 3:53 PM Subject: Re: Sacraments     > Ron & List,   > A trouble I have is that the number "seven" is always a magic number, = even > now in the year AD 2002. Research has shown that if you ask any group of > people their favourite number, the biggest number will choose seven over any > other number. > And so we get seven days in a week, the seven seas, the seven colours in the > rainbow, the seven continents, seven sacraments, seven orders of > ordination, etc.etc.etc. I have no objection to this, but to say Christ > instituted seven sacraments is stretching it too far: I think various parts > of the Church added things to make up the magical number. > What do you think? > Kind regards, > Ross        
(back) Subject: Re: Seven Sacraments, at least! From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 14:55:15 -0600   At 03:53 PM 1/15/02 -0500, you wrote: >Actually, in all your long list of groups of seven things, you neglected = the >Seven Dwarfs, clearly an oversight.   Actually there were eight Dwarf's but Walt did not like the morals of the eighth and he was banished from the set.   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:59:41 EST   Dear Ross   Confirmation and Bar Mitzfa are counterparts denoting the same thing. All of what Christ did was within the bounds of the Jewish Rabinacle Tradition. Even the Mass is based upon Synagoge Services. As far as Confirmation Jesus sent the Holy Spirit to those in the upper room. A rushing mighty wind and tongues of fire settled upon each one present. Jesus said If I do not ascend into heaven the Holy Spirit will not come. So Jesus is the agent by which the Pentecost occured, and Pentecost is also a Jewish special day. The Holy Spirit was sent to fulfill Christ's plan.   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 13:04:46 -0800       Ross & Lynda Wards wrote:   > Ron & List, > With all due respect, and I mean this most sincerely, what you call a > sacrament depends on who you are, as is belief that Christ instituted a > particular thing as a sacrament. > There is no evidence that Christ instituted marriage as a sacrament, for > example - we are merely told that he was present at a wedding.   Agreed. But he had some PRETTY strong things to SAY about it in the = Gospels, over against the prevailing custom of the "quickie" divorce in his day. = All a practicing (male) Jew had to do was step outside his door and say "I = divorce you" three times, I believe.   > In the same > way, there is no evidence at all in the Scriptures for any rite of > confirmation. There was baptism, and that was that. Where do you find > evidence of Christ instituting confirmation?   Confirmation came about with infant baptism, which came about during the persecutions so that parents could be reasonably certain their children = would be raised as Christians (by the godparents) in the event that they themselves = were martyred. Children baptised as infants had to make their OWN profession of = faith when they reached an age that they could do so.   Christmation was a part of adult baptism very early on, as it still is for infants AND adults in the Eastern Orthodox Churches today.   > On the other hand, you could easily read the footwashing ceremony as the > institution of a sacrament, seeing Christ gave us physically the example = of > doing it and told us to do the same, yet no church at all, as far as I = am > aware, has ever done this as a sacrament. Do you know of any?   The "Foot-Washin' " Baptists of course (grin), and a fair number of other protestant churches in the rural Deep South. But, oddly enough, most = separate it from the Communion, which may not even be celebrated in the same service.   > Is it perhaps > because it is too earthy, and too humbling to those receiving it, and = has no > suggestion of power-for-clergy in it? Possibly.   ROFL! TRFH refuses to wash women's feet because a man is supposed to "rule = over" a woman in church, or some such nonsense; also, because it's not "proper" = to touch any woman other than one's wife (we also don't exchange the Peace); = OTOH, he DOES get down on his knees and DO it ... I always wonder what goes = through his mind when he DOES.   He DIDN'T until I came to St. Matthew's ... it came as part of the general revision of the Holy Week rites ... THEY were still doing the PRE-1950s = rites straight out of the old Missal.   > I wonder this every Easter > when celebrating it (yes, celebrating is the right word) with my parish = on > Maundy Thursday evening.   It IS the crux of the matter, isn't it? I can't imagine omitting it.   > A trouble I have is that the number "seven" is always a magic number, = even > now in the year AD 2002. Research has shown that if you ask any group of > people their favourite number, the biggest number will choose seven over = any > other number. > And so we get seven days in a week, the seven seas, the seven colours in = the > rainbow, the seven contintents, seven sacraments, seven orders of > ordination, etc.etc.etc. I have no objection to this, but to say Christ > instituted seven sacraments is stretching it too far: I think various = parts > of the Church added things to make up the magical number. > What do you think?   Of course (grin) ... the list goes on and on and ON ... virtues, deadly = sins, etc. etc. etc.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Washing of the Feet From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 16:10:23 EST   Dear Ross   The washing of the feet came close on the heels of a remark made by the mother of two of the Apostles called the Son's of Thunder. She requested that they get thrones on either side of Jesus in heaven. Jesus washed the feet to illustrate humility, and He said he who wishes to be greatest must be the least, follow my example. In processions always the most important priest or bishop walks at the end of the line. The accolytes, the least lead the procession, the greatest walks last. Didn't they teach you this stuff in the Seminary? Humility? There was another seen where places at table were disputed. The choice place was awarded by the giver of the feast, and he who took the place had to give it up! How embarrassing! And take a lower place of honor! OUCH!   Regards,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Seven Sacraments, at least! From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:09:09 -0600   I recall an organist friend telling me decades ago, when he went through confirmation class at St. James Cathedral in Chicago, that the teacher, Dean Howard Kennedy, asked how many sacraments there were. Lloyd, brought up a Baptist, came up with some abysmally low number like two. The dean invited him up to the front of the class, had him bend over, and proceeded to swat him on the rear end seven times with a Prayer Book. It worked like a charm: He certainly never forgot how many sacraments the = were!   These classes were held in the Dean's large study in the old chapter house that had a Rush Street address ... oddly, it was 666. I've found = that to be unforgettable as well.   Bob Lind     From: Malcolm Wechsler <manderusa@earthlink.net> on 01/15/2002 02:53 PM     Dear Sacrachat-L,   Actually, in all your long list of groups of seven things, you neglected the Seven Dwarfs, clearly an oversight.   My proof of the existence of seven Sacraments is that for years in many Episcopal churches here, the coffee hour has been referred to as the "Eighth Sacrament." Surely this is proof positive that there are at least seven others!        
(back) Subject: Re: Sacraments From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 16:26:48 -0500   All this sounds like Arthur LaMirande (or his ghost) is baaaack!   This is NOT a theological/polemical list.   Genug!   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist fees From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 16:35:12 -0500       Ron Severin wrote: > > The organ design was theirs, John Wanamaker thrilled by > the genius of both men happily built the organ their way.   Well, it was John's son Rodman who did most of the spending of the = family/company's money on the organ, and Courboin had much more continuing input than Dupre, because he = was there so much.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: RE: Sacraments From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:48:41 -0600   AAAAUUUUGGGGHHHH....   -----Original Message----- From: Stan Yoder [mailto:vze2myh5@verizon.net] Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 3:27 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Sacraments     All this sounds like Arthur LaMirande (or his ghost) is baaaack!   This is NOT a theological/polemical list.   Genug!   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org