PipeChat Digest #2659 - Thursday, January 17, 2002
 
Re: The RCL and you
  by <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Bach's Arioso
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Mutations in the Plenum??
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: Mutations in the Plenum??
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
RE: Mutations in the Plenum??
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: The RCL and you
  by "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org>
Re: Mutations in the Plenum??
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
quint couplers
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Prepared-for divisions
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Various ons and offs
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: Prepared-for divisions
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Chicago International Organ Festival 2002.....17, 18, and 19 Febr	uary
  by "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org>
Looking for an anthem
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
old anthem books ... HELP! (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The RCL and you From: <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 12:13:37 +0100   My church moved over to it over three years ago now. About the same time = the RSCM started publishing a booklet called 'Sunday by Sunday' which went = out with its quartlerly mailing to all affiliated churches (in the UK at = least, I don't know about further afield.) For each sunday they suggest = hymns, anthems and organ music for before, during and after. Some sample = materials are available on thier website (www.rscm.com) A valuable = resource for those of us that are in charge of music on top of a full time = job. Talking of which, I have to rush off and teach a class of 14 year = old girls now!     Steve Barker Organist and Choirmaster St Stephen's Church, Canterbury, UK     _______________________________________________________________________ Never pay another Internet phone bill! Freeserve AnyTime, for all the Internet access you want, day and night, = only =A312.99 per month. Sign-up at http://www.freeserve.com/time/anytime      
(back) Subject: Bach's Arioso From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 10:53:55 -0400   Could someone tell me where the Arioso by Bach that Virgil Fox arranged = (on page 13 of "Virgil Fox the Organist" comes from in Bach's works? I am playing it on a recital devoted the "The Art of the Transcription" on Jan. 27 and would like to provide that information in the program.   Many thanks.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Mutations in the Plenum?? From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 08:46:27 -0800 (PST)   On another list there is a discussion of the 5-1/3 Nasard in (French) = classical organs, and a good deal of historical coonfirmation of its use not only as a 16' Cornet in = the French Classical organs, but in the large Principal choruses of Baroque Gremanic = instruments as well.   I am rather interested in this topic as I find I am drawn to the inclusion = of mutations in full Principal registrations, particularly in Baroque music. My tastes fly from = one school to another, and while I love contemporary music, romantic music, and improvisation, I = think my strong suit in playing the organ literature is in the baroque schools of composers just = before Bach's maturity.   As a young organist, I absolutely detested the strong mutations at 2-2/3 = and 1-3/5 one often finds in neo-baroque instruments, and especially I thought the Quintadena 16' = was an unacceptable horror!   As I have grown older, however, I find that the added layer of sound of = the mutation registers drawn with the plenum is very attractive. At St. Peter's, in an instrument = with only 20 ranks we have included an open conical Nasat and a tapered Terz in the swell, = fairly typical stops, the Nasat is a replacement for the Rohrflute pipes of the original Nasard = which is now a proper 4', and the Terz pipes are original but have been regulated to speak = confidently. The Great also includes an independent Twelfth. I have also included in the great a 1-1/3 = extension of the Nasat and the Sesquialtera, duplexed from the swell, and I plan to include a = 5-1/3' Gross Nasat as well.   Most of my colleagues will say they never include mutations in ensemble = choruses of any type, and it is not "correct" to do so, however, The baroque organs of Trost have = many Terz colors included in the Mixtures, and I hear in a number of recent and current recordings = of Bach the inclusion of cornet ranks in the chorus.   Those of you who care to discuss this topic are invited to do so either = privately or on-list. I have not included a structured routine of serious organ playing in my days = for several years, but find that I am now once again enjoying the benifits of doing so. Currently = polishing the g Minor fugue of Bach, and will begin the Fantasia this morning. I am also = polishing the Mulet Carillon-Sortie and working on my first ever Lubeck Praeludium, as I just = was not into re-doing the Bruhns G Major. I played the Bach for my junior recital and frankly = don't know how I even got through the piece all those years ago, but it is wonderful to be playing = it now. Any ideas as to what is too fast or slow for the fugue, or does everyone tailor it to the = acoustics of the room.   I simply MUST replace the metronome that I seemed to have lost in the move = across the country! It is such a wonderful tool for maintaining a steady tempo! Never thought I = would say that, but I could sure use one now! I fear I am trying to push the tempo of the fugue = to the point it sounds rather flippant rather than the grand masterpiece it is. I guess I need to = make use of the mini disc that is only 3' from the console!!   Randy   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry, Director of Music Ministry & Organist Mona Dena, Assistant & Principal Conductor The Episcopal Church of St. Peter 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail! http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/  
(back) Subject: Re: Mutations in the Plenum?? From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 12:06:03 -0500   >Those of you who care to discuss this topic are invited to do so either privately or on-list.   This is an interesting topic which I would like to see on- list.   Dick  
(back) Subject: RE: Mutations in the Plenum?? From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 13:18:26 -0500   The development of my tastes parallels yours, i.e. I am now more willing = to entertain a place for-- let's say strange, colorful pitches-- in a plenum than in my student days in the 60s.   The experience I most remember along these lines was a brief time at the Father Willis in Salisbury Cathedral. Some of the mixtures have tierces, and the effect is very fine-- much different from that of throwing a flute tierce, or even a sesquialtera (which is most properly made of principals, isn't it?) into an ensemble on an American organ.   E.M. Skinner (and possibly others in his era?) sometimes included a choir-to-great 5 1/3' coupler (e.g. at Washington Cathedral). A few years ago I saw this coupler again on the Rufatti organ at S. Mary's, Wayne PA. Ted Alan Worth was a major influence, at least, on the latter instrument, and doesn't he mention in _Virgil, The Dish_ that he was a student of Paul Callaway (even though he forgot how to spell his name correctly). Hence this coupler at Wayne might have been inspired directly from the example = at Washington, which was then unique. Or was it more widely found? Probably in both cases this coupler was lost in later rebuilds.   Alas, on both occasions, I merely considered it something bizarre and = didn't try to experiment with when/how it could be useful. This is, I am now inclined to suggest, always a mistake. The longer one lives, the more one comes to appreciate that when an artist reputable and celebrated in his = own day goes to the trouble of producing something like that, he knows what he is doing. By dismissing it a priori on the basis of some kind of = cultural prejudice of our own, or even a complacent mystification, albeit with a shortage of access as an excuse, we are only depriving ourselves of the closest we can come to a time machine. If we wish to broaden our = horizons, we should embrace such an opportunity to introduce ourselves to what seems most strange and different.   One friend who is a Skinner aficionado admires this innovative coupler as contributing "richness" to an ensemble.    
(back) Subject: RE: The RCL and you From: "Alan Freed" <parishadmin@stlukesnyc.org> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 13:38:17 -0500   We switched to RCL several years ago, and our publishing house uses those materials exclusively--and our denom (ELCA) publishes all kinds of resource materials, so we have it quite easy to match things up.   Alan, St. Luke's, Manhattan   -----Original Message----- From: Glenda [mailto:gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com]=20 Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 7:21 PM To: 'PipeChat'; PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu Subject: The RCL and you   I have a question for you liturgical organists out there. How many of you are in churches that have switched to the Revised Commmon Lectionary, and have you found it easier or harder to match up/select hymns and prelude/postlude music for the RCL?   We're still with the prayer book selections, so I was curious in case the decision was made to change here.   Glenda Sutton             "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Mutations in the Plenum?? From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 08:41:28 +1300   We have an organ not too far from here that has a 6 2/5 SubTierce on the Great as an experiment, taken off a good Dulciana rank. With full organ, = it does add a significant colour to a remarkable organ, but I'd never like to see it anywhere else, even less to hear it. My organteacher used to say that we should experiment with all kinds of unlikely combinations, right through the compass, as we might something horrendous that works beautifully just for 12 notes that would make it a good solo combination in a chorale prelude. I think that's good advice. And, provided there are the basics, I have personally no need to impose doctrinaire standards of design on = instruments. I remember E.Power Biggs telling me many many years ago that he had to = fight the Flentrop firm very hard to get them to put the Tierce on the Great in the Busch-Reisinger Museum, as that was NOT, and they repeated NOT, their practice. Biggs, 'Tough, but do it anyway.' Ross -----Original Message----- From: Randy Terry <randyterryus@yahoo.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, January 18, 2002 5:46 AM Subject: Mutations in the Plenum??     >On another list there is a discussion of the 5-1/3 Nasard in (French) classical organs, and a good >deal of historical coonfirmation of its use not only as a 16' Cornet in = the French Classical >organs, but in the large Principal choruses of Baroque Gremanic = instruments as well. > >I am rather interested in this topic as I find I am drawn to the = inclusion of mutations in full >Principal registrations, particularly in Baroque music. My tastes fly = from one school to another, >and while I love contemporary music, romantic music, and improvisation, I think my strong suit in >playing the organ literature is in the baroque schools of composers just before Bach's maturity. > >As a young organist, I absolutely detested the strong mutations at 2-2/3 and 1-3/5 one often finds >in neo-baroque instruments, and especially I thought the Quintadena 16' = was an unacceptable >horror! > >As I have grown older, however, I find that the added layer of sound of = the mutation registers >drawn with the plenum is very attractive. At St. Peter's, in an = instrument with only 20 ranks we >have included an open conical Nasat and a tapered Terz in the swell, = fairly typical stops, the >Nasat is a replacement for the Rohrflute pipes of the original Nasard = which is now a proper 4', >and the Terz pipes are original but have been regulated to speak confidently. The Great also >includes an independent Twelfth. I have also included in the great a = 1-1/3 extension of the Nasat >and the Sesquialtera, duplexed from the swell, and I plan to include a 5-1/3' Gross Nasat as well. > >Most of my colleagues will say they never include mutations in ensemble choruses of any type, and >it is not "correct" to do so, however, The baroque organs of Trost have many Terz colors included >in the Mixtures, and I hear in a number of recent and current recordings = of Bach the inclusion of >cornet ranks in the chorus. > >Those of you who care to discuss this topic are invited to do so either privately or on-list. I >have not included a structured routine of serious organ playing in my = days for several years, but >find that I am now once again enjoying the benifits of doing so. = Currently polishing the g Minor >fugue of Bach, and will begin the Fantasia this morning. I am also polishing the Mulet >Carillon-Sortie and working on my first ever Lubeck Praeludium, as I just was not into re-doing >the Bruhns G Major. I played the Bach for my junior recital and frankly don't know how I even got >through the piece all those years ago, but it is wonderful to be playing = it now. Any ideas as to >what is too fast or slow for the fugue, or does everyone tailor it to the acoustics of the room. > >I simply MUST replace the metronome that I seemed to have lost in the = move across the country! It >is such a wonderful tool for maintaining a steady tempo! Never thought I would say that, but I >could sure use one now! I fear I am trying to push the tempo of the fugue to the point it sounds >rather flippant rather than the grand masterpiece it is. I guess I need = to make use of the mini >disc that is only 3' from the console!! > >Randy > >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >Randy Terry, Director of Music Ministry & Organist >Mona Dena, Assistant & Principal Conductor >The Episcopal Church of St. Peter >178 Clinton Street >Redwood City, California >www.stpetersrwc.org > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail! >http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/ > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: quint couplers From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 08:47:19 +1300   No, your example is not unique, as WurliTzer used to do this. Probably the most famous example is in the 3/13 Reg Dixon played at the Tower Ballroom, Blackpool, England, and you can thus hear it on many recordings. Quint Trumpets at 5 1/3 are known also, and there is one Capetown, or used to be. A church in Wellington here has two 16ft reeds on the Pedal, unified = upwards to 8 and 4. Recently, the 16ft Oboe was rewired to speak at 32ft to TenC, then the 16ft at 10 2/3 down to CCC. So, they have an Acoustic Bass Oboe 32ft. It actually works, and in a church dead acoustically what's more. Again, I can't say I'm in favour of the idea, not really, but admit it's interesting surprise effect here. Ross      
(back) Subject: RE: Prepared-for divisions From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 14:45:16 -0500   >This is the season when the Prepared For Antiphonal Division comes into = its own. Although personally, I find these divisions a little confusing. = They tend to be voiced in such a way that I cannot tell whether I am listening = to a prepared for digital division or prepared for real pipes.   .... or a faint echo.   There was an article about thirty years ago in the _Diapason_ devoted to = the Unison Off stop. While informative, it was mainly intended as a whimsical essay for the April issue. Among the subsequent letters to the editor was the inevitable huffy flame deploring the waste of time and paper, from the subscriber entirely devoid of a sense of humor. Someone else (well, = myself, to be precise) suggested that the unison off was a particularly, even uniquely, valuable stop, because it sounded even better on an ugly instrument than on a beautiful one.      
(back) Subject: Various ons and offs From: <SProt82850@cs.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 15:28:09 -0500     >Someone else (well, myself, >to be precise) suggested that the unison off was a particularly, even >uniquely, valuable stop, because it sounded even better on an ugly >instrument than on a beautiful one.   I find it extremely valuable when the minister requests that I play on the = quietest possible stop! Its gentle and lyrical voicing also seems to = accompany shuffling feet quite well. I just wish the organ I play had a = "minister on minister off". It comes in handy when one is visited by an = excessively windy (and we're not talking Bourdons here!)minister and one = needs to be out of church to join friends for brunch!   Steven        
(back) Subject: Re: Prepared-for divisions From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 15:29:55 -0500   Dear Paul and list, I have a unison off stop on my Allen and can't, for the life of me, figure out what such a stop would be useful for. I'm sure someone has some suggestions. Paul Valtos   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 2:45 PM Subject: RE: Prepared-for divisions     > >This is the season when the Prepared For Antiphonal Division comes into its > own. Although personally, I find these divisions a little confusing. They > tend to be voiced in such a way that I cannot tell whether I am = listening to > a prepared for digital division or prepared for real pipes. > > ... or a faint echo. > > There was an article about thirty years ago in the _Diapason_ devoted to the > Unison Off stop. While informative, it was mainly intended as a = whimsical > essay for the April issue. Among the subsequent letters to the editor = was > the inevitable huffy flame deploring the waste of time and paper, from = the > subscriber entirely devoid of a sense of humor. Someone else (well, myself, > to be precise) suggested that the unison off was a particularly, even > uniquely, valuable stop, because it sounded even better on an ugly > instrument than on a beautiful one. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Chicago International Organ Festival 2002.....17, 18, and 19 Febr uary From: "Cole, Carroll" <CCole@fourthchurch.org> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 15:27:04 -0600   The Chicago International Organ Festival 17, 18, and 19 February 2002 Now in it's 3rd season, this year's festival will feature three of the world's most exhilarating organists performing transcriptions of recognizable audience favorites. Sunday, February 17, 2002 3:00 p.m. Peter Richard Conte Monday, February 18, 2002 7:30 p.m. . Carol Williams Tuesday, February 19, 2002 7:30 p.m. David Briggs   Chicago International Organ Festival 2002 17, 18, and 19 February 2002 The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago Mailing Address: 126 East Chestnut Street, Chicago, IL 60611-2094 Phone: 312.787.2729, ext. 600 facsimile: 312.787.4584 Website: www.fourthchurch.org Suggested donations: $12 / $10 seniors, students, AGO members Handicapped Accessibility: Yes, on N. Michigan Ave. and at 126 E. Chestnut St. Contact: C. Carroll Cole Phone: 312.787.2729, ext. 252 E-mail: ccole@fourthchurch.org   C. Carroll Cole, Coordinator of Fine Arts Fourth Presbyterian Church 126 East Chestnut Street, Chicago, IL 60611-2094 312.787.2729, ext. 252 facsimile 312.787.4584 ccole@fourthchurch.org <http://www.fourthchurch.org>      
(back) Subject: Looking for an anthem From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 21:33:13 -0000   Dear List,   I am trying to find a copy of the Easter anthem "Arise in us" by Martin Shaw. It was published by Novello in a book called "In the beauty of holiness" - a good book but one that now is well out of print.   Can anyone help??   Thanks,   Steve Barker Organist and Choirmaster St Stephen's Church, Canterbury, Kent    
(back) Subject: old anthem books ... HELP! (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 13:49:00 -0800   Can anyone spare a tattered (but complete) copy of the OLD Oxford "Church Anthem Book" and/or the OLD Novello anthem book (forget the title)? I've lost mine, and repeated requests to Oxford, Novello and Pepper have gotten me either (1) nothing, or (2) the NEW Oxford (and Novello? I forget) books, which I can use, but I still need the old ones.   E-mail me privately for a snail mail address, if you've got 'em.   THANKS!   Bud