PipeChat Digest #2942 - Monday, July 1, 2002
 
Re: Zimbelstern Question
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: With apologies to Victor Hugo
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
re:tons of ideas and missed pistons...
  by "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca>
Re:  Zimbelsterns
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Annapolis Organ Company
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
zimbelstern
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: Zimbelstern
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons...
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Press release - Curt Mangel named Curator
  by "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com>
Re: Annapolis Organ Company
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Zimbelsterns
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net>
OHS Chicago-First Full Day 6/26
  by <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Zimbelstern Question From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 14:11:18 -0400   I heard Joan Lippincott years ago, when I was in high school and went to = the choir camp for highschoolers at Westminster Choir College, use the = Zimbelstern in a performance of Komm Jesu vom Himmel zu uns herunter = (don't remember if that's the exact title, the one from the Schu"bler = chorales).   Funny the things one remembers after so many years.   Merry  
(back) Subject: Re: With apologies to Victor Hugo From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 13:24:12 -0500   On 6/29/02 8:20 PM, cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk wrote:   > In recalling all this, I wonder what equally delightful effects are = available > to us with the excellent percussion and bell effects available on modern > digital synthesisers.....here is a musical opportunity worthy of > investigation.   I've noticed a dearth of church bell/chime/carillon sounds on typical keyboards and even on sample sound disks/CDs. My Kurzweils for instance = have a multitude of usable keyboard and orchestral sounds as well as many tuned percussions but only a rather lacklustre "Tubular Chimes" sound (on both = my PC-88 and my K1200) in the real church bell category. "Sleigh Bells" and "Chrysoglott" don't really cut it for those "Chimes" pieces.   I'm looking for both soft and quite robust bell sounds. I'd love to be = able to add a bell solo over full organ as well as soft chimes behind a sentimental hymn. Anyone know of a source of great bell sounds?   Russ    
(back) Subject: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons... From: "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 16:57:37 -0400   David wrote...     Aha! What if the other organists had made the same error as the Bruhns player and missed the Cymbelstern piston!! You'd have had.....   Bach, IN DULCI TUBALO Daquin, NOEL SUR LA TUBA Murrill, CARRILL-ON THE POSAUNE LES CLOCHES ET ANCHES CORNOPEAN DE WESTMINSTER Vierne, BERCEUSE FONDUE (Fonds doux with red wine) Bruhns, PRELUDE AND FUGUE WITH CYMBLESTERN STRETTI     What about the Christmas Carol with full reed chorus called "LES ANCHES DANS NOS CAMPAGNES.."   Regards,   Steve  
(back) Subject: Re: Zimbelsterns From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 15:55:00 -0700 (PDT)   I use our zimbelstern a good bit. Very often it comes on on the last verse of big joyous hymns. It just adds a sparkly sheen over fairly full organ. There, but not overbearing. I use it with the Bach "In Dulci Jubilo" and on one of the Daquin variations at Christmas as another listmember mentioned. Yesterday I did a funeral and played the "Stele Pour Un Enfant Defunt" of Vierne. No, I didn't use the Z machine there, but the whole time I was playing it, my wife was in the tower bonging out changes on the chime stand (10 bell Meneeley) which sound very ethereal and distant inside the church. Outside, people run for the shelters! At weddings, I let my wife start rounds on the tower bells and do at least four before I launch into the recessional. While I play, the bells continue in changes. I also used the Purvis "Communion" which uses notes occasionally on our organ chimes (which otherwise barely work!). At the end while holding the last chord I give a little flourish on the zimbelstern which always makes people smile. Add this to our beautiful mass bells and sacristans bell it makes for a bell-rich service.   Ken   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Kenneth Potter, Organist/Director of Music St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square, Bronx, NY 845/358-2528 <swell_shades@yahoo.com>, Austin Op. 2097 at: = http://www.nycago.org/Organs/html/StPetersEpBronx.html =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Annapolis Organ Company From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 21:10:45 -0300   Just wondering , While visiting my Local museum I noticed that there is a reed Organ there.It used to be in the Church in the Wildwood, just a couple miles from my house.The church is now gone but the Reed Organ now rests in the Museum, On it Is Annapolis Organ Company. Does anyone know about this company. WHere it was located and when? Daniel WH     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.372 / Virus Database: 207 - Release Date: 6/20/2002    
(back) Subject: zimbelstern From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 20:33:30 -0400   I heard Joan Lippincott years ago, when I was in high school and went to = the choir camp for highschoolers at Westminster Choir College, use the = Zimbelstern in a performance of Komm Jesu vom Himmel zu uns herunter = (don't remember if that's the exact title, the one from the Schu"bler = chorales).   Funny the things one remembers after so many years.   Merry    
(back) Subject: Re: Zimbelstern From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 20:39:37 -0400   LOL - very funny! (below) David's friend is very clever.   sorry if my little story was sent twice. i thought it didn't go thru the = first time.   Off to Philly in the morning, am looking forward to it.   Merry   In a message dated Sat, 29 Jun 2002 9:45:35 PM Eastern Standard Time, = DrB88 writes:   > Dear all... > After sharing Colin's funny story with an off-list friend of mine, he = returned the following.... I thought you might enjoy it!! > > David ...in Chicago > ************************ > Aha! What if the other organists had made the same error as the Bruhns = player and missed the Cymbelstern piston!! > You'd have had..... > > Bach, IN DULCI TUBALO > Daquin, NOEL SUR LA TUBA > Murrill, CARRILL-ON THE POSAUNE > LES CLOCHES ET ANCHES > CORNOPEAN DE WESTMINSTER > Vierne, BERCEUSE FONDUE (Fonds doux with red wine) > Bruhns, PRELUDE AND FUGUE WITH CYMBLESTERN STRETTI      
(back) Subject: Re: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons... From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 13:43:55 +1200   Very good indeed! Thank you from the heart of my bottom! Ross -----Original Message----- From: Steve Gilson <sgilson@sympatico.ca> To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, July 01, 2002 8:55 AM Subject: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons...     >David wrote... > > > Aha! What if the other organists had made the same error as the Bruhns > player and missed the Cymbelstern piston!! You'd have had..... > > Bach, IN DULCI TUBALO > Daquin, NOEL SUR LA TUBA > Murrill, CARRILL-ON THE POSAUNE > LES CLOCHES ET ANCHES > CORNOPEAN DE WESTMINSTER > Vierne, BERCEUSE FONDUE (Fonds doux with red wine) > Bruhns, PRELUDE AND FUGUE WITH CYMBLESTERN STRETTI > > >What about the Christmas Carol with full reed chorus called >"LES ANCHES DANS NOS CAMPAGNES.." > >Regards, > >Steve > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Press release - Curt Mangel named Curator From: "Robert Ridgeway" <robert@magneticlab.com> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 20:48:00 -0500   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11917524= =3D=3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed     > > >> >> >>Curt Mangel Appointed Curator of the Wanamaker Organ in >>Philadelphia >> >> >>Curt Mangel was appointed Curator of the famous Wanamaker Organ in the >>Grand Court at Lord & Taylor in Philadelphia in March 2002. >> >>Previous to his appointment, Mr. Mangel served as supervisor of the >>8-person restoration facility of Jasper Sanfilippo in Barrington Hills, >>Ill, a position he held for 11 years. During that time he used his >>considerable talents in the restoration of several million dollars worth =   >>of pipe organs, orchestrions, steam engines, clocks and arcade machines >>that constitute the bulk of the famous Sanfilippo Collection. >> >>In the early 1970s, Mr. Mangel spearheaded the saving of Shea's Theatre >>in Buffalo, N.Y., and the restoration of its original Wurlitzer, >>including extensive fund-raising responsibilities. Later he did the same =   >>thing for the Paramount Theatre in Denver. >> >>He moved to Chicago and applied his knowledge and techniques for the >>historic Uptown Theatre. He restored the tower clock in the Pullman >>Building and the Waveland clock and carillon on the Chicago Lakefront. >>Through these clock and carillon restorations he became known to Jasper >>Sanfilippo, who hired him to restore several he was including in his = museum. >> >>There, Mr. Mangel restored the 50 hp Spencer organ blower for the >>Sanfilippo instrument and the mechanical console lifts and controls. He >>is recognized as one of the leading organ-blower experts in the Nation. >> >>Sanfilippo curator Robert Ridgeway remarked, "A person who possesses all =   >>of the skills of a Curt Mangel is a rare individual indeed, and our loss =   >>is certainly Philadelphia's gain. The Wanamaker Grand Court Organ at = Lord >>& Taylor couldn't be in better hands. Curt's mechanical and >>deductive-reasoning skills are the best I have ever encountered." >> >>Also previous to his appointment at Lord & Taylor, Mr. Mangel headed the =   >>Friends of the Wanamaker Organ Symposium program, which brings the >>Nation's top organ technicians to Philadelphia for a series of workshops =   >>on the fine art of historic-organ restoration. This program is = continuing >>during his Lord & Taylor tenure. >> >>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11917524= =3D=3D_.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><br><br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite><br><br> <div align=3D"center"><font face=3D"arial" size=3D2><b>Curt Mangel = Appointed Curator of the Wanamaker Organ in<br> Philadelphia</b><br><br> </div> <br> Curt Mangel was appointed Curator of the famous Wanamaker Organ in the Grand Court at Lord &amp; Taylor in Philadelphia in March 2002. <br><br> Previous to his appointment, Mr. Mangel served as supervisor of the 8-person restoration facility of Jasper Sanfilippo in Barrington Hills, Ill, a position he held for 11 years. During that time he used his considerable talents in the restoration of several million dollars worth of pipe organs, orchestrions, steam engines, clocks and arcade machines that constitute the bulk of the famous Sanfilippo Collection.&nbsp; <br><br> In the early 1970s, Mr. Mangel spearheaded the saving of Shea's Theatre in Buffalo, N.Y., and the restoration of its original Wurlitzer, including extensive fund-raising responsibilities. Later he did the same thing for the Paramount Theatre in Denver. <br><br> He moved to Chicago and applied his knowledge and techniques for the historic Uptown Theatre. He restored the tower clock in the Pullman Building and the Waveland clock and carillon on the Chicago Lakefront. Through these clock and carillon restorations he became known to Jasper Sanfilippo, who hired him to restore several he was including in his museum.<br><br> There, Mr. Mangel restored the 50 hp Spencer organ blower for the Sanfilippo instrument and the mechanical console lifts and controls. He is recognized as one of the leading organ-blower experts in the Nation.<br><br> Sanfilippo curator Robert Ridgeway remarked, &quot;A person who possesses all of the skills of a Curt Mangel is a rare individual indeed, and our loss is certainly Philadelphia's gain. The Wanamaker Grand Court Organ at Lord &amp; Taylor couldn't be in better hands. Curt's mechanical and deductive-reasoning skills are the best I have ever encountered.&quot; <br><br> Also previous to his appointment at Lord &amp; Taylor, Mr. Mangel headed the Friends of the Wanamaker Organ Symposium program, which brings the Nation's top organ technicians to Philadelphia for a series of workshops on the fine art of historic-organ restoration. This program is continuing during his Lord &amp; Taylor tenure.<br> <br> <br> </font></blockquote></blockquote></html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11917524= =3D=3D_.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Re: Annapolis Organ Company From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 22:12:48 -0400   On 6/30/02 8:10 PM, "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> wrote:   > Just wondering , > While visiting my Local museum I noticed that there is a reed Organ > there.It used to be in the Church in the Wildwood, just a couple miles > from my house.The church is now gone but the Reed Organ now rests in the > Museum, > On it Is > Annapolis Organ Company. > Does anyone know about this company. WHere it was located and when? > Daniel WH > > > --- > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). > Version: 6.0.372 / Virus Database: 207 - Release Date: 6/20/2002 > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > Well, I think Annapolis means the city of Anne (Queen? Of England). It's the capitol of Maryland. More on request.   alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Zimbelsterns From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 23:06:26 -0500   It's funny...this came up this morning. We had a high school-aged touring group of puppeteers this morning and also last Sunday, and they were = talking about how some of the people in the group were RAVING about our pipe = organ, and especially the spinning star! :-)   Jeff    
(back) Subject: OHS Chicago-First Full Day 6/26 From: <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2002 21:30:14 -0700   OHS Chicago =96 1st Full Day, 6/26/02   This was our first full day, and it was perhaps a cruel joke to schedule = bus departure for 8:15. Through the rest of the convention, we will not again leave this early. I guess we were being broken in!   In the early days of OHS conventions, cozy affairs that they were, the programs presented were almost thought of as more demonstrations of the = organs than formal recitals. I think I am correct in saying that there has been a gradual shift to thinking that we want well-thought out and well prepared recitals, played to a very high standard. This approach has, in recent = years, attracted well-known touring virtuosi to our cause, which is spreading the word about the beauty and importance of the worthy old organs in our = country. This year, for example, we will hear Thomas Murray, Ken Cowan, Christa = Rakich, and Peter Sykes. In the recent past, we have also heard Mark Brombaugh, = Bruce Stevens, Joan Lippincott, Charles Krigbaum, and others. But the bulk of = the recital/demonstration work falls mostly to regular, faithful members and supporters of the organization, some of whom have played at many = consecutive conventions. This report is about the first full day, but I have, in fact, = now heard the recitals of three full days of the convention, plus those of = several year=92s worth of conventions. I have begun to feel over time that more, = and more careful, preparation is needed sometimes, this to overcome the = special stresses that are part of playing for good friends and colleagues on = strange instruments. I have heard a lot of distressed passage work, and thought of = all the things that I was told by my excellent teachers about overcoming the = fear. I pray God I will never be asked to play at a convention, but if it = happened, my knees would be knocking together, my hands would be at full tremble. I would do the very slow practice, sometimes with a metronome, sometimes in several different rhythms, anything to pound the notes into my fingers so = that nothing could dislodge them. Slowly is the key to it all, along with a = variety of touches. I hope I might be forgiven this <ex cathedra> sort of writing, which is much easier to do than playing. Occasional recitals are somewhat marred by a lack of assurance and sufficient time spent in effective preparation. Why am I so smart? Because as a totally inept pupil, I = required and received a lot more teaching than those of my colleagues who possess a much greater talent! My late, lamented teacher, Vernon deTar, used to take great delight in introducing me to people by saying, =93Meet Malcolm, my = worst ever student!=94 I have taken comfort in recent years from the discovery = of a number of other former Vernon students who were similarly introduced!!   Mary Ann Crugher Balduf, Organist-Choirmaster of St. Luke=92s Episcopal = Church, Ypsilanti, MI, has played at just about every OHS convention I have = attended, which is more than a few. She used to joke that she is only allowed to = play single manual instruments. That was true of today, but what an instrument! = St. John United Church of Christ, Palatine, IL has an organ believed to have = been built by a builder called Emil Wetzmann in about 1885. I can write here = the specification because it is so short. 8=92 Open Diapason, 8=92 Stopped = Diapason, 8=92 Dulciana, 4=92 Principal, 4=92 Flute, 2 2/3 Twelfth, 2=92 Fifteenth. = The Pedal consists of a 16=92 Bourdon and a coupler. Could you manage with this? = Well, let me tell you what Mary Ann managed to play on this absolutely beautiful instrument: James Marsh (1752-1828) . . . March. You had to be there. At the first big loud chord of this piece, every head swiveled around to see what manner of organ it was coming from. What a glorious sound, and probably just the = right sort of piece to show it off! Theodore Salome (1834-1896) . . . En Forme de Canon. Rather a better work = than most Salome I have heard! Boellmann . . . From Heures mystiques (Opus 29) . . . Elevation. This very sweet piece showed off the incredibly beautiful gentle stops, including a Dulciana that one can really hear. Rudolf Bibl (1832-1902) . . . From Six Characteristic Pieces for Organ = (Opus 64) . . . Vision. Another lovely piece, with a gentle beginning, a later buildup, and ending quietly. Rheinberger . . . From Twelve Fughettas (Opus 123a), No. 7 . . . Andante. = This is a richly crafted little piece. Howells . . . Miniatures for Organ (unlike any other Howells you may know) 6. Moderato =96 short, sweet and spirited 8. Poco Allegro - Rather similar in character to 6, above 11. Moderato con moto =96 a very playful piece 13. Allegro Giocoso =96 rather a running and jumping piece, extremely = short. Langlais . . . From Twenty-four Pieces for Organ . . . Priere pour les = morts. That wonderful Dulciana again, the Flute added, then the 8' Open, then = back down. A disjunct second section, leading back to a gentle ending on the Dulciana, This is a work that Mary Ann played after the events of 9/11. = How apt to follow it with =93All my hope on God is founded,=94 to the tune = Michael, Herbert Howells=92s response to the death of his young son Michael. Andrew Clarke (b. 1941) . . . from =93Three English Hymn Tunes=94 . . . = All my hope on God is founded. This fascinating piece works with fragments of = melody, followed by a couple of complete statements of the tune, fascinatingly harmonized. We then all sang the hymn, heartily indeed. Harry Rowe Shelley (1858-1947) . . . Scherzo Beginning indeed as a = scherzo, with a gentle legato middle section, and then back to the beginning = material with a very big ending. Just reading over this wonderfully put together program is exciting. To = hear it all is a great blessing. Where else but at an OHS Convention can we = have this experience at least 30 times over? Thank you, Mary Ann!   Robert E. Woodworth Jr. combines a career as an architect with an active = life as a freelance organist in the Chicago area. In what was, I believe, his = first OHS Convention appearance, he played a two-manual tubular-pneumatic = Hutchings, Opus 1661 from 1910, restored by the Berghaus Organ Company in 1973. = There are 19 independent ranks, including a rather powerful 16 Open Wood in the Pedal! The program, of works by Chicago composers, was as follows: Robert W. Jones (b. 1932) . . . From Sonatina for Worship, No. 7 . . . = Fanfare II. This rather pleasant work, with, I thought, some Hindemith influence, = gave us a chance to hear the instrument in full. It really does fill the space. = Felix Borowski (1872-1956) . . . Meditation =96 Elegie. We heard more = Borowski during the rest of this convention. He was a big man in Chicago, once President of the Chicago Musical College, resigning in 1916 to become a full-time composer and critic. He was Music Critic for the Chicago = Sun-Times, and for 50 years, wrote program notes for the Chicago Symphony. Mr = Woodward=92s inclusion of this work in today=92s program was a nice touch. This Meditation-Elegie, part of a Suite for Grand Organ, was played by Wilhelm Middelschulte at the dedication of this Hutchings Organ in 1910! Dudley Buck (1839-1909) . . . Two Pieces 1. Allegretto . . . The Pedal 16 Open really shone in moving Pedal = passages. This is an =93active=94 and interesting piece. 2. Rondo . . . A rather fun main thematic idea, something of a fanfare = motif. Lily Wadhams Moline (c. 1879-1966 I guess this lady never quite told her = age!) From Suite II for Organ . . . Intermezzo. Very sweet - something of a = short Rondeau. A note on the music indicates that =93The Raven=94 of Edgar Allan = Poe inspired this work! =93Quoth the Raven . . . Nevermore.=94 Maybe a bit odd = for a Rondeau. (Forget I said that!) Mrs. Moline was organist at First Church of Christ, Scientist in Oak Park, now an arts center, which we will visit = later this week. Jack C. Goode (1921-2002 This year=92s Organ Handbook for the convention = is dedicated to his memory.) . . . Rest in Peace. This is one of Mr. = Goode=92s last published works, and I found it quite interesting in its ideas, = melodically and harmonically. Mr. Goode taught at Wheaton, American Conservatory of Music, and Northwestern. His 1964 book on Pipe Organ Registration is well known, = and was printed in three languages. Philip P. Bliss (1838-1876) . . . Impromptu. I thought this rather a = strange piece, but I did not make a good note of why I thought so! Sorry. Bliss, active in Baptist church music, was associated with the Moody Memorial = Church and the Moody Bible Institute. He died at 38 in a train wreck in Ohio. Following Impromptu, we sang a hymn, both words and music by Philip Bliss, = a sort of 6/8 romp: Wonderful Words of Life. Thanks to Robert Woodworth for = a most interesting program, and also for his terrific program notes, from = which came all the information above.   Susan Werner Friesen has been a busy person this week. She has what we organists sometimes refer to as a *real* job in the computer world, and is = an Associate in Ministry in the ELCA. She served as Program Coordinator for = this wonderful convention. All that and playing a recital too =96 on a 1904 one-manual instrument by something called the Wisconsin Pipe Organ = Factory! Not to worry. This instrument, with a manual 16=92 (taken from the Pedal Subbass) had a very full and bright sound. We are in St. Mary Roman = Catholic Church, Buffalo Grove, IL. The program: Boellmann . . . from Heures Mystiques, Vol. 2, Opus 30 . . . Offertoire. Pachelbel . . . Two settings of <Meine Seele erhabt den Herren> The rather typical Pachelbel pairing, a fughetta first, followed by an animated = manual 2nd section with big cantus in Pedal. Bach . . . Pastorale. This was done without repeats, because we were = rather too far behind schedule, because of the late arrival of our buses at the = hotel first thing in the morning, and, in fact, Ms. Friesen seemed to be rushing inordinately in several pieces, her position as coordinator making her = aware of the implications of our serious lateness. The 8=92 & 4=92 Principals = were really bright & wonderful. The 1st movement felt a bit rushed. The 2nd movement lost its grace because of a very matter-of-fact rapid tempo. The = next movement seemed also quite rushed. This matter of tempi is, of course, entirely subjective judgement on my part. Others will disagree, and will, = I hope let me hear about it! The last movement felt right, and received a = very clean and articulate performance.- William Horatio Clarke (1840-1913) . . . Pastorale in A. This is a = charming piece. What would have been manual changes, had there been another manual = to change to, were deftly handled. This organ has two mechanical = combinations, for Piano & Forte, and these helped. John Henderson=92s Directory of = Composers for Organ tells us that Clarke, from Massachusetts, was rich and famous, = as composer, performer, and author of Organ Method Books and other material. = In his home, he had a four-manual, 100 rank organ! Horatio William Parker (1863-1919) So we go from William Horatio to = Horatio William! . . . Pastoral Interlude (Opus 32, No. 4). Are you getting the feeling we are on a Pastorale kick, for some reason, possibly apt. for a = place called Buffalo Grove. =93Oh give me a home, where the Buffalo roam . . . = =94 A rather sweet and gentle piece. Time for the Hymn, =93Savior, like a shepherd lead us=94 to the tune = Sicilian Mariners. Ms. Friesen was determined not to let us breathe, I am afraid. = While we were breathing after each phrase, she had already taken off without us. Benjamin Carr (1769-1831) . . . Variations to the Sicilian Hymn. Rather a = cute set of pieces, edited by Barbara Owen. Carr was an English student of = Samuel Wesley, and ended up in Philadelphia, as some of us will do next week, as organist of St. Peter=92s Church.   Mary Gifford is Director of Music at St. Leonard Roman Catholic Church of Berwyn, IL, and is a member of the National Council of the OHS. She holds degrees from Indiana University and the University of Southwestern = Louisiana. She played this day the first Hinners of the convention, a small = two-manual instrument with nothing over a 4=92 (a Principal on the Great and an = Harmonic Flute on the Swell). Don=92t despair. This little organ spoke authoritatively and fully into quite a dead space! The program: John A. West (b. 1853, not to be confused with the better known John E. = West) .. . . Rustic Wedding, a diverting if naive little piece. Quite complex, = it seemed to fall away from Ms. Gifford a bit =96 first piece nerves, = perhaps. W. S. Lloyd Webber (1914-1982, (the *real* composer in the family!) . . . = From Three Pieces: Prelude, Cradle Song, and Aria =96 rather pleasant parlor = music, very nicely played. Harrison M. Wild (1861-1929) . . . Andante - A lovely Melodia solo - very sweet & nicely done. Wild was a student of Clarence Eddy, but also studied = in Leipzig. He held several church posts in Chicago, became deaf at age 65, = and his death in 1929 was a suicide. Of course, it was also the year of the = Stock Market Crash. Hymn =96 What heavenly music steals over the sea=94 to a tune from, are = you ready, =93James White=92s Hymns for God=92s Peculiar People.=94 He got that = right! There was a rather nice descant by Ms. Gifford. We did not do very well with it, but = we tried. Frank Ferko (b. 1950 =96 a Chicago composer) . . . Variations on St. = Elizabeth 1. Moderately =96 The well-known melody clear, with quite interesting = harmony 2. Lightly, with motion =96 A bit like Frogs & Birds 3. A la musette - Pleasantly piquant 4. Chorale in Baroque Style =96 A nice ornamented chorale prelude 5. Adagio - Altered melody with a tremulous accompaniment 6. Finale a la Valse - A sort of clipped, Gospel style.   This recital did not end the day. After dinner, we drove to Plum Tree = Farm, the Sanfilippo residence in Barrington Hills, IL. This is home to an astonishing and enormous instrument consisting mostly of Wurlitzer = pipework, about which one cannot speak briefly. Between the OHS and Ken Cowan, there = is a special bond running in both directions. Both the magnificent place, the organ, and Ken=92s nothing-short-of-amazing recital will be discussed in a separate posting. It has to be that way. I hope to work on this during the upcoming bus rides =96 it is an event I long to write about. We will all = long remember.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com