PipeChat Digest #2943 - Monday, July 1, 2002
 
RE: Shoe shines and key cleaning
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Annapolis Organ Company
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
RE: Shoe shines and key cleaning
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Robert Morton
  by "Berley Antoine Firmin II" <FIRMAN1@prodigy.net>
Ach!!
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons...
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Extension question
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  part three (LONG)
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
!!!Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  part three (LONG)
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: Extension question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Extension question
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: Robert Morton
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Extension question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Extension question
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Extension question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Extension question
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Extension question Sharing?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Extension question Sharing?
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Shoe shines and key cleaning From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 10:25:25 +0100   Hello,   I am confused!   From the evidence thus far, I have deduced that:-   a) Mark Hubbard has a husband   b) "She" is a kid   c) "She" has crush on a 40 year old lady piano teacher   d) "She" has a shoe fetish and requests that organists send shoes. (What = next?)   Is payment involved in this "menage a trois" and, if so, are the = authorities aware of it?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                 -----Original Message----- From: "m hubbard" <markhubbard@comcast.net>=20 Subject: Re: Shoe shines and key cleaning=20     Thanks, but I have all the fulfillment here I need. The organist is my piano teacher. My husband says I like her better than I like him. She is truly amazing. She taught me at forty to play the piano, well too. But it suits me to hang out with music nerds. (I hope that doesn't offend you) I think all of you guys and gals must have the most brain convolutions of any profession except nuclear scientists, and mathematicians. Send your shoes, I'm darn good at it! =20 Shoe shine girl   I am a shoe shiner, coffee-maker, and key cleaner for the organist at our church. We have maple white keys, and rosewood black keys. I am looking for help on how to clean them... it seems like you WOOD be able to help me. I've got the coffee and shoes under control. This is my second attempt at the sending of this message, so I hope it goes through this time.=20 Thanks,=20 Shoe shine kid=20  
(back) Subject: Annapolis Organ Company From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Mon, 01 Jul 2002 06:16:31 -0500   Greetings:   The second edition (1998) of Gellerman's International Reed Organ Atlas, Vestal Press, Inc. gives the following information regarding Annapolis = Organ Company:   "Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, 1880, 1882"   There may be more information available on the ROS (Reed Organ Society) website.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: RE: Shoe shines and key cleaning From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 08:44:32 -0400   Is this the list's soap opera? Do I hear a Hammond avec vibrato while this reads out? Tune in tomorrow and find out.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D I am confused!   From the evidence thus far, I have deduced that:-   a) Mark Hubbard has a husband   b) "She" is a kid   c) "She" has crush on a 40 year old lady piano teacher   d) "She" has a shoe fetish and requests that organists send shoes. (What next?)   Is payment involved in this "menage a trois" and, if so, are the = authorities aware of it?  
(back) Subject: Robert Morton From: "Berley Antoine Firmin II" <FIRMAN1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 08:02:06 -0500   Hi all, Yesterday I was treated to see Gone With the Wind (for $.75!) at the = Saenger Theatre in New Orleans....and for 15 minutes before the show heard the Robert Morton Wonder Organ (a 4M Unit Orchestra) played by Mr. Rene = Brunet. Too bad most of the audience had no appreciation of the concert and talked loudly through his performance. I enjoyed it anyway and leaned my head = back to watch the clouds roll by in front of stars on the blue sky of an = Italian Piazza in this "atmospheric theatre".      
(back) Subject: Ach!! From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:23:59 -0400   Tsk, tsk, tsk. Didn't one of the manuals you read, while teaching = yourself, instruct you to NEVER do that? You should develop balance at the near = front edge of the bench and whizz up and down that board with lightening = speed--if need be--without holding onto the bench with your hands. Get Pietro Yon's pedal book and read about sitting posture. Of course, if someone uses furniture wax, as once happened to me, to = polish the bench then you will slide right into the pedals and require assistance in getting out. Let's hope is doesn't happen during service as it did to = me. I should have realized there was going to be a problem when I first sat. = As I attempted to slide to the center of the bench that morning (which is the way I always approach an organ bench) I slid clear to the other side and right off the bench, yet fortunately landed on my two feet. I felt like an Olympic athlete. I'm sure the priests celebrating the mass were wondering, "what the hell is he doing NOW!!" when I slid into the pedal board during the reading of the gospel and sounded a lovely tone cluster in the = pedals. I believe it was ABCC#DD#EFF#. There might have been a G in there somewhere. I don't remember, I was much too long ago. Robert Colasacco   - One question: Is it just me, or do the rest of you have to hang on to the bench for dear life when playing two footed pedal lines without manuals? Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK    
(back) Subject: RE: re:tons of ideas and missed pistons... From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:28:54 -0400   Very good indeed! Thank you from the heart of my bottom! Ross   =3D=3D=3D Oops, do I hear a Tuba Mirabilis in the works here?  
(back) Subject: Extension question From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 11:39:35 -0400   I don't know why it never occurred to me before or why it should now but = in reviewing an organ specification list I saw, as I have so done hundreds if not thousands of times before, 32' Bombard (ext.), 16' Bombard, and so on and so forth. Again, so many times before I've seen extention pipes = (usually in the bass) of an octave. My question is, and I've never thought about = this before since I've never played such a beast, when both the stop of the = full compass is drawn together with the "extention" stop, in this example let's say both the pedal 32' (ext) and 16' Bombard are drawn do both pitches = sound at C pitch and above or is only the 16' pitch sounding in that top octave and 1/2? In other words is the ext. 32' just that and that alone, an extention down an octave on the lower octave or does it sound through the whole range of the pedal whereby at C pitch and above it is basically then = a coupled pitch. I guess my example should have been if the 32' were used alone would anything above B sound in the pedal? How's this for a stream of conscious piece. Am I making sense to anyone? Where am I? I am hungry so I know I'm alive. I think. In other words, I draw the 32' ext. knob. What plays, only the 12 bottom notes or the whole pedal board? There you go. That's what I want to know. Phew!! Thank you, you are very patient. Robert   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org    
(back) Subject: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: part three (LONG) From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:00:55 -0700 (PDT)   Dr. Hall=92s Tour of the United Kingdom in the Year of Grace 2002.   Part Three: Dr. Hall Eats Thai Beef Red Curry in a English Pub, and Continues to Shift the Fork to His Right Hand.   Day Four, concluded.   After checking in to my hotel, I took the Tube back from Hubn to Tower Hill (and there is a perfectly beastly connection en route=97I thought I was in the Twilight Zone, with all the up and down and up and down on escalators for at least half a mile) and practiced till eight-thirty or so. I had been given the huge skeleton key to the church, so I carefully locked up, as Englishly as I could, and went back to Hubn to my hotel. I decided to eat in a pub. To hell with my Slim-Fast and fruit; I was going to eat like a local.   The odd thing is, and this is truly odd for the American psyche, is that pubs in London are advertising curry as =91traditional=92 fare. On reflection, why not? But it was a bit of a shock at first, I=92m not sure why. I think my inner literature student expected legs of mutton and chines of swine, or whatever Dr. Johnson would have eat. (That was the past tense then, and pronounced =93et=94.)   I ended up in a cheap collegiate sports kind of place, a=97pardon me=97straight bar=97the kind of place I rarely go, and sat at the bar. My American accent probably led people to excuse my total ignorance of the game on the TV=97which I wouldn=92t have watched whether it were soccer or baseball.   I ordered a Thai beef red curry. And damned if it isn=92t British pub food after all. It came up on the dumbwaiter and looked just like shepherd=92s pie. For five quid, there was precious little meat in it.   On the street, a pathetic young woman with track marks DRAWN on her arm told me she had epilepsy and needed bus fare, etc. I did not give her any money. I must have been screaming =93TOURIST=94 though I was trying = to fit in, and I am fairly street smart.   The hotel fire alarm went off at 3 AM, and my first confused thought was "air raid!" Yes, the imagination of this late baby-boomer is deeply colored by World War II stories...we all trooped down into the Dickensian back street behind the hotel, no fire was seen, and were soon allowed back to our rooms.     Day Five. The Recital.   I was worried about this recital; it was the longest one I=92d play, and required many stop changes. And I had ONE general, remember? And setter boards, so I had to be ready to go from the first note.   My program went thus:   =93A Recital of Mostly American Music.=94   Festival Prelude on a Theme of Palestrina, Dudley Buck   Air, Gerre Hancock   Suite, 1977, Calvin Hampton: i. fanfares ii. antiphon iii.toccata   Elms, Ned Rorem   Deus Tuorum Militum, Leo Sowerby   Lotus, Strayhorn/Wyton   P and F in E flat, =93St. Anne=94, Bach   Program weighed in at fifty-five minutes, longer than I=92d expected. Professor Melling turned pages, which was very sweet of him. (I did have one glitchette with pistons...Sorry, Dr. Hancock...but the program, I=92m glad to say, found favor.)   The organ was really a sister to my Aeolian-Skinner, except for the combination action. Its tonal design is bright-ish, but very musical. It fills the space beautifully and works for a lot of repertoire. On Sunday, Jonathan would play Whitlock and Mozart and both would work splendidly.   Afterwards, we had fish and chips in a local pub (the Hung, Drawn and Quartered, I think it was called). We joked about my American fork-and-knife technique.   (Note to Americans: no one else in the world starts with the fork in the left hand to cut, then shifts to the right to eat. I am told the custom is seen as =93endearing.=94 Miss Manners advises us not to try to imitate other techniques if we don=92t feel comfortable with them; American usage is considered correct and appropriate, including when we are abroad. I retained the American practice throughout my trip, not wanting to seem =93plus Anglais que vous=94. I=92m no redneck, but in = fact I cherish American customs. For what it=92s worth....)   That afternoon, I took the 16:18 train to Oxford for my final recital.   Next installment: Dr. Hall Dies And Goes to Heaven   ----------------------fin------------------         __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: !!!Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: part three (LONG) From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 12:26:37 -0400   Hi, Jon,   > After checking in to my hotel, I took the Tube back from Hubn to Tower > Hill (and there is a perfectly beastly connection en route-I thought I > was in the Twilight Zone, with all the up and down and up and down on > escalators for at least half a mile) and practiced till eight-thirty or > so. I had been given the huge skeleton key to the church, so I > carefully locked up, as Englishly as I could, and went back to Hubn to > my hotel. I decided to eat in a pub. To hell with my Slim-Fast and > fruit; I was going to eat like a local.   You must be a smoker, right? On my one and only trip to the UK, about 3 years ago, I ate (the word "dined" would be a bit precious for this sort = of place, now wouldn't it?) in several pubs in both London and in York, and = was extremely turned off by the overpowering miasma of cigarette smoke which seemed universal to British pubs. I loathe smoke as only a reformed = smoker can. I indulged for 20 years, but have been abstinent for almost that = long, now.   > On the street, a pathetic young woman with track marks DRAWN on her arm > told me she had epilepsy and needed bus fare, etc. I did not give her > any money. I must have been screaming "TOURIST" though I was trying to > fit in, and I am fairly street smart.   During my trip, I was accosted by only two panhandlers during a week and a half in London. Both were older gentlemen, impeccably groomed and well turned-out, and extremely polite. One hit me up on Brompton Road in = South Kensington, not far from the Brompton Oratory, and the other on the plaza = in front of Buckingham Palace as I watched the changing of the guard! The neat appearance of them so shocked me, being accustomed to the scruffiness of our American panhandlers as I am, that I gave each of them a couple of quid, a thing which I almost never do here at home.   > Afterwards, we had fish and chips in a local pub (the Hung, Drawn and > Quartered, I think it was called). We joked about my American > fork-and-knife technique.   If it was English (as opposed to American), wouldn't it have been = "Hanged?" <g>   > (Note to Americans: no one else in the world starts with the fork in > the left hand to cut, then shifts to the right to eat. I am told the > custom is seen as "endearing." Miss Manners advises us not to try to > imitate other techniques if we don't feel comfortable with them; > American usage is considered correct and appropriate, including when we > are abroad. I retained the American practice throughout my trip, not > wanting to seem "plus Anglais que vous". I'm no redneck, but in fact I > cherish American customs. For what it's worth....)   This may or may not interest you; if not, there's always the delete key. The cutlery I routinely use at home has forks with 3 widely-spaced tines, = as opposed to the more commonplace 4 rather closer-set ones. For that = reason, I find it next to impossible to eat such things as rice and peas with the damned things, and I always use a soup spoon for that purpose by preference, since I'd rather not spread my dinner all over the tablecloth, the floor, and worst of all, ME! A few years back, Miss Manners' column = in the newspaper carried a diatribe, for want of a better word, by her inveighing against those who are gauche enough to eat solid foods from = their plates with a spoon, rather than a fork. I dashed off a quick note to her explaining that, in my opinion, she's got a screw loose if she prefers to see people make an unholy mess of their meals rather than use the = implement they personally find more comfortable. Funny thing; she didn't reply. = <g>   Thanks, ever so much, for your witty and delightful reporting on your trip to the UK. I've loved every word of it. BTW, did you rent a car and try = to drive on the "wrong side of the road?" That was the experience of my = young life, and I'd love to hear what you thought of it. Next time I go to the UK, I will definitely stick to public transit, or if necessary, hire BOTH = a car AND a driver!   Keep well,   Dave    
(back) Subject: Re: Extension question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 13:07:29 EDT   Dear Robert:   The 32' Bombard extention should play through the full compass of the pedalboard just like any other extention stop. It's called an Augmented pedal division. The theory behind it is that usually single notes are played in the pedal, so a few extended ranks can fill out a pedal division without compromising polyphony as in the manuals. Throw in some 16' manual duplexes, a mixture or two for variety and you save a great deal of money on pipes. I haven't looked this up in a while but the name Helmholst and Tartini tones come to mind. Robert Hope Jones of course took this theory to its enth extreme and applied less is better to the manuals as well.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Extension question From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 13:12:54 -0400   Thank you Ron. I didn't intend for this to be a question about just that = 32' Bombard, rather of ALL extension stops. But to carry thru with this particular example, adding the 16' Bombard (the "REAL" stop) to the 32' we get two tones at octave playing throughout the full compass (thanks for = that word Ron, I couldn't think of it) throughout the full compass of the = pedals? Is that correct? Robert   -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com [mailto:RonSeverin@aol.com] Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 1:07 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Extension question     Dear Robert:   The 32' Bombard extention should play through the full compass of the pedalboard just like any other extention stop. It's called an Augmented pedal division. The theory behind it is that usually single notes are played in the pedal, so a few extended ranks can fill out a pedal division without compromising polyphony as in the manuals. Throw in some 16' manual duplexes, a mixture or two for variety and you save a great deal of money on pipes. I haven't looked this up in a while but the name Helmholst and Tartini tones come to mind. Robert Hope Jones of course took this theory to its enth extreme and applied less is better to the manuals as well.   Ron Severin   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Robert Morton From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 12:30:25 -0500   Are you telling us that the New Orleans Saenger organ is working? Wow - when did that happen?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Berley Antoine Firmin II   Hi all, Yesterday I was treated to see Gone With the Wind (for $.75!) at the Saenger Theatre in New Orleans....and for 15 minutes before the show heard the Robert Morton Wonder Organ (a 4M Unit Orchestra) played by Mr. Rene Brunet. Too bad most of the audience had no appreciation of the concert and talked loudly through his performance. I enjoyed it anyway and leaned my head back to watch the clouds roll by in front of stars on the blue sky of an Italian Piazza in this "atmospheric theatre".        
(back) Subject: Re: Extension question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 13:35:53 EDT   Dear Robert:   I think most of this confusion is the result of entirely straight organs even in the pedal. In the tracker days of old and neobaroque it was thought that straight ranks were the only way to go. Even then some duplexing and resonance divisions were possible to increase the flexability of an instrument. All are REAL stops, just augmented and borrow other pipes to fill out the compass. A twelve note set of wooden Bombards 32' are indeed a luxury, and probably encompass 1/2 the board feet of lumber used to build the organ. Now that may be a slight exaggeration, but not by much. It's one of the reasons digital 32' reeds and flues are used, and seem to speak better and cost next to nothing, compared by the extremely high cost of the real pipes. It saves on wind consumption, lumber, space and a lot of other alteratives. Many times these huge pipes are recycled from old organs, reworked, and revoiced if that is desired.   I hope that answers your questions.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Extension question From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 13:44:10 -0400   Thanks Ron, it doesn't answer my question but I appreciate learning more = and more and most assuredly do appreciate the knowledge you give me--for nuttin', no less. But my question is just one of how an extension stop works. Let's get away from the big guy 32' expensive, space consuming Bombard and go to an Open Diapason 8' with an Octave 4' extension. When = both are drawn, from how I understand your explanation, both an 8' and 4' sound (and preferable the most beautiful of diapason sound there ever was or is) but both 8' and 4' will sound when all 61 keys of the Great is played = (which is the division I've placed them on). Every single key on that Great = manual when depressed will sound it's respective 8' and 4' tone without any = missing either in the lowest or uppermost octave of the keyboard. Is that true? Robert   -----Original Message----- From: RonSeverin@aol.com [mailto:RonSeverin@aol.com] Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 1:36 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Extension question     Dear Robert:   I think most of this confusion is the result of entirely straight organs even in the pedal. In the tracker days of old and neobaroque it was thought that straight ranks were the only way to go. Even then some duplexing and resonance divisions were possible to increase the flexability of an instrument. All are REAL stops, just augmented and borrow other pipes to fill out the compass. A twelve note set of wooden Bombards 32' are indeed a luxury, and probably encompass 1/2 the board feet of lumber used to build the organ. Now that may be a slight exaggeration, but not by much. It's one of the reasons digital 32' reeds and flues are used, and seem to speak better and cost next to nothing, compared by the extremely high cost of the real pipes. It saves on wind consumption, lumber, space and a lot of other alteratives. Many times these huge pipes are recycled from old organs, reworked, and revoiced if that is desired.   I hope that answers your questions.   Ron Severin   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Extension question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 14:45:58 EDT   Dear Robert:   On the manuals a single 8' stop extended to 4' will indeed lose polyphonic notes in the middle of the chord. You can only play a pipe once in the sequence. I would never do this with a Principal or Diapason unless it was absolutely necessary. Soft flute or string more likely. To avoid this, some builders supply Principals or Diapasons at 8' and 4' on separate ranks and draw a 2' off the 8' rank. It's not the best to do, but does avoid the polyphonic issue. The issue then with the 2' is that its the wrong scale and volume and probably a bit too loud. The Principal or Diapason chorus either requires a separate 2 2/3' Quint or a lower pitched mixture beginning at 2', 1 1/3', 1', 2/3' breaking back in the tenor octave to 2 2/3, 2', 1 1/3' 1' to supply the missing Quint with two more breaks to carry the Quint and Fifteenth the rest of the way up the keyboard. Splitting a Fourniture IV into a RauschQuint II 2 2/3', 2' no breaks and a 1 1/3' 1' with breaks will compensate, but perhaps not the best route. I say supply the Quint separately and go from there.   Now having said that, if indeed a small 3 or 4 rank unit organ is desireable to conserve space, variable scaling may work to cover some of the difficulties but certainly not the polyphonic deficiency. The organ will exhibit a bottom and top with no middle, unless registered appropriately, an either or proposition. You have also entered Robert Hope Jones territory, there is no free lunch. A practice organ is what it is. You can play most of the liturature, but you have to live with the polyphony draw backs.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Extension question From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 14:51:13 -0400   Perfect. Thank you. That's what I never knew and now I do know it. Should = I expect to be billed? Do you accept VISA, AmEx or DISCOVER card? Thank you Ron, Robert    
(back) Subject: Re: Extension question Sharing? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 15:06:30 EDT   Dear Robert:   A lot of things have costs, but sharing is priceless.   Ron  
(back) Subject: RE: Extension question Sharing? From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 15:08:53 -0400   Absolutely true.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     Dear Robert:   A lot of things have costs, but sharing is priceless.   Ron