PipeChat Digest #2952 - Tuesday, July 9, 2002
 
Obituary; Gerald Albert Bales (x posted)
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca>
Re: The POE (sorta long)
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
RE: ALT  KEY  CHARACTERS  (OFF TOPIC)
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: ALT  KEY  CHARACTERS  (OFF TOPIC)
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
La Marseillaise; Gerald Bales (x-posted)
  by <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: La Marseillaise; Gerald Bales (x-posted)
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  Part Four (LONG)
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: Extension question
  by "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net>
Re: The POE (sorta long)
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Vernon de Tar
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Vernon de Tar
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Vernon de Tar
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: Vernon de Tar
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Sources for Leslie speaker info?
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  Part Four (LONG)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
PIPECHAT ON IRC
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: PIPECHAT ON IRC
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  Part Four (LONG)
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  Part Four (LONG)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Obituary; Gerald Albert Bales (x posted) From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 08:20:37 -0400   This link will take those interested to an obituary for Gerald Bales who died this past Thursday. http://www.canoe.ca/LondonToday/lf.lf-07-08-0066.html     Hugh Drogemuller London On.    
(back) Subject: Re: The POE (sorta long) From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 07:44:11 -0500   Paul Soulek wrote:   > I attended the Sioux Trails' AGO's POE from June 23-28. It was a new > experience for me, having no "formal" organ lessons. Paul, that's really great! Wish more people were interested enough to do that too.   > > The problem that I find now, is that there are so many other things > going on that I can't find time to practice. Welcome to the world of organists <G>.     We "finished" the > organ now, so it looks nicer. The pipes haven't been voiced > yet, but the organ-tech knows that I'm waiting. Ok, I know I've edited your comments, but how can an organ be "finished", and even be used if the pipes aren't voiced?   Inquiring mind wants to know.   jon bertschinger  
(back) Subject: RE: ALT KEY CHARACTERS (OFF TOPIC) From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 09:30:58 -0400   =A2   -----Original Message----- From: douglas morgan [mailto:dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com] Sent: Sunday, July 07, 2002 12:56 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: ALT KEY CHARACTERS (OFF TOPIC)     Dear Listmembers:   A few minutes ago, I sent a reply to Cremona502@cs.com, and it went to the list and not where I intended it to go.   I made a mistake in that I was typing the numnbers on the main keyboard and not on the number keypad. Now that I have corrected that, Mike's system works like a charm.   D. Keith Morgan   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: ALT KEY CHARACTERS (OFF TOPIC) From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 09:32:00 -0400   Ah, there you go. I just assumed it didn't work on my system. Thanks for this tid bit. Now I know it does work even on this system. robert bernardino colasacco =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   I made a mistake in that I was typing the numnbers on the main keyboard and not on the number keypad. Now that I have corrected that, Mike's system works like a charm.  
(back) Subject: La Marseillaise; Gerald Bales (x-posted) From: <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 09:24:40 -0500         Since July 14 falls on a Sunday this year, I'd like to play a closing v= oluntary that incorporates some of La Marseillaise in it. I immediately think of= the Langlais "Chant hero=EFque" but would be interested to know of other possibilities, particularly because I think I ran across just such an o= rgan work recently but forgot to make a note of it.   With the sad news of the death of Gerald Bales on July 4, I am thinking= of playing some of his works in memoriam (which may supplant my prelude pl= ans for 7/14) and wonder what list members might recommend. I was impressed a f= ew years back with a few things published by Randall Egan in 1989 and will have = to look again at his Prelude in e in Organ Music of Canada, vol. 2.   Thanks in advance for your suggestions for either or both.   Robert Lind Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Naperville, IL =      
(back) Subject: Re: La Marseillaise; Gerald Bales (x-posted) From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 10:36:11 EDT     --part1_4f.200ae28d.2a5afd5b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I was also thinking of playing La Marseillaise as a postlude this Sunday, = but was concerned about the connotations associated with it.   Probably most of our folks will not even know those connotations, and = since it's postlude, it probably won't matter (grin).   What say ye?   Neil by the Bay   --part1_4f.200ae28d.2a5afd5b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I was also thinking of playing La Marseillaise = as a postlude this Sunday, but was concerned about the connotations = associated with it.<BR> <BR> Probably most of our folks will not even know those connotations, and = since it's postlude, it probably won't matter&nbsp; (grin).<BR> <BR> What say ye?<BR> <BR> Neil by the Bay</FONT></HTML>   --part1_4f.200ae28d.2a5afd5b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG) From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 07:55:41 -0700 (PDT)   Dr. Hall=92s Tour of the United Kingdom in the Year of Grace 2002.   Part Four: Dr. Hall Dies And Goes to Heaven       Oxford, Oxford!   Sero amavi te!   If I get a second lifetime, I shall spend it--all of it--there. Or have I already spent a life there and thrill with a deep remembrance?   I stood in the very epicenter of Anglophonic erudition, and I shall never forget it. I left part of my heart in that beautiful place. I respect no other university quite so highly. Indiana and Chicago for my own education, Yale for my father=92s, and Oxford because I speak English.   I was met at the station, after a brief journey out of Paddington, by a friend of my host Clive Driskill-Smith. He would not allow me to carry my bag=97he insisted on taking it and walking me to Clive=92s place at Christ Church.   For the American who is not used to this system, let me explain that Oxford University is a constellation of virtually independent colleges, founded at various times over the last eight centuries. Christ Church was founded by Henry VIII on the grounds of the dissolved priory of St. Frideswide, Patron Saint of Oxford. In the spacious quadrangle, there seems to be the remains of a cloister.   Christ Church Cathedral is the only cathedral in the world that is also a college chapel. It is called the smallest, or one of the smallest, cathedrals in the British Isles, yet I found it quite large enough! It is a tall, long, perpendicular structure, the west end of which is dominated by a magnificent four manual Rieger from 1981. This was installed during Simon Preston=92s tenure as Organist.   Harvard Yard gives one a hint of the quiet, easy ancientness of this place, the cool yellow of the stone, the echoes of Latinity. It gives no hint, though, of the endless English twilight, that quiet, softly-lit time when time stands still and one can talk and listen and be at ease.   I understand English poetry for the first time, having spent a long twilight in the Christ Church Sheep Meadow...going so far into the subject as abandoning a started PhD dissertation on British literature, I still understood it not at all till I saw Oxford at twilight. I found myself endlessly repeating Hopkin=92s sonnet, =93Dun Scotus=92 = Oxford=94:       TOWERY city and branchy between towers; Cuckoo-echoing, bell-swarm=E8d, lark-charm=E8d, rook-racked, = river-rounded; The dapple-eared lily below thee; that country and town did Once encounter in, here coped and pois=E8d powers;   Thou hast a base and brickish skirt there, sours That neighbour-nature thy grey beauty is grounded Best in; graceless growth, thou hast confounded Rural rural keeping -- folk, flocks, and flowers.   Yet ah! this air I gather and I release He lived on; these weeds and waters, these walls are what He haunted who of all men most sways my spirits to peace;   Of realty the rarest-vein=E8d unraveller; a not Rivalled insight, be rival Italy or Greece; Who fired France for Mary without spot.     =93...he haunted who of all men most sways my spirits to peace...=94 that line perfectly encompasses my feelings for the place.   So, one doesn=92t just =93go to Oxford.=94 One goes to a particular = college and identifies closely with it. Gerard Manley Hopkins, just quoted, went to Balliol (long A)...in front of which is an unpaved spot in the street marking the exact site of Archbishop Cranmer=92s burning at the stake...   And there was the Eagle and Child (or, irreverently, The Bird and Baby), the pub where the Inklings (C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, inter alia) met and talked. I sat in their favorite room and had the best steak pie of my life, with a pint (or three) of local bitters, a warmish barely carbonated beer that had to be vigorously pumped up from the depths... After which there was The Bear, =93an historic pub since 1284;=94 and that sign occasions no small dissent from those who point out =93It wasn=92t historic IN 1284.=94 My head hit the ceiling as I stood there by the fireplace, drinking more bitters.   After which there was The Hobgoblin, a dreadful tourist trap with a bartendress from Baltimore. As I sat sipping bitters, some soccer yobs came in draped in St. George=92s flags=97the ensign of England as opposed to the UK=97and saying =93OY=94 though they weren=92t Jewish, and began = looking for a place to light. I resigned my table to them and tottered home. I slept with the tower of the Cathedral guarding me through a skylight. I have seldom felt safer.   In the loft at Christ Church is a plaque with all the organists from the foundation of the college.....what a nice custom for all of our churches to observe. The organ is a dream to play; light, responsive touch, powerful but elegant voicing. It is quite loud in the room=97I was chidden by a verger!=97but the recital went quite well. Here I played all Bach, and the Friends of Music of Christ Church sponsored the program and charged two quid admission (that=92s a whopping Three Bucks, Amerikaners.)   I played the Bach/Vivaldi a minor; the Schmucke dich, the solo of which I played on the Positiv 8=92 Principal with back doors of the Positiv open (that I might hear the line and its balance clearly); and the Saint Anne. all of this to the delight of the Organ Scholar (a very likeable and energetic young spark who bounded up to the loft in his scholar=92s gown and bow-tie afterwards). The audience in general seemed quite appreciative.   Would I actually fit in here? I have no idea; I=92m very American. But....I felt deeply, intuitively, and immediately at home. I might well come to miss barbecues, and Chinatown, and lobsters, and Central Park=97but I know I shall always miss Oxford.     Next installment: I Am Sent Down, return to London, and then to America   ---------------------------------------     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Extension question From: "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 07:59:20 -0700   What is this string of messages about? I am clueless. Did I miss the first question re this subject? Fran ----- Original Message ----- From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, July 07, 2002 7:11 PM Subject: Re: Extension question     > the things one learns on this list! > i do have a separate mouse, an optical mouse. much better than the kind with the ball. using the stroke pointer (or whatever it's called) on the laptop would drive me crazy. > merry > > In a message dated Sun, 7 Jul 2002 7:47:29 PM Eastern Standard Time, vdbarton@erols.com writes: > > > Oh, yes it does. It's not as convenient to use as a standard = keyboard, but > > it can be done. The "numeric keypad" is imbedded in the right side of the > > regular keyboard, and is accessed by selecting the NUMLOCK key. Of course, > > that makes it impossible to simultaneously use the ordinary characters of > > those keys. The best solution is to go to a place like CompUSA and = buy a > > cheap keyboard (generally less than $15.00) to connect to your laptop. I've > > never used the keyboard built into my laptop. It's a pain, and I make too > > many mistakes with it. A separate, standard keyboard is definitely = the way > > to go. A real mouse, as opposed to the pointing devices all laptops have > > built into them, is also a good thing to have. Much easier to use. > > > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> > > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Sunday, July 07, 2002 5:39 PM > > Subject: Re: Extension question > > > > > > > to get these ASCII characters, what does one do on a > > laptop, which does > > not have the extra numeric keypad on the right? > > > Merry > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: The POE (sorta long) From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 12:03:03 -0500   jon bertschinger wrote: > > Ok, I know I've edited your comments, but how can an organ be > "finished", and even be used if the pipes aren't voiced?   "Finished" refers to the physical organ structure --- that contains the blower and reservoir.   The pipes speak, but some have flaws in speech, and need to be taylor-made to the room. The only reason that the pipes are functional with our console is because the blended sound downstairs is much better than with the electronics alone. Hopefully that sound will be even better after the pipes are voiced.   After church I was sitting at a table by an electrician who attends our church. He said he isn't musical at all, but likes to sing and everything. He said "how much nicer the organ sounds now than it did before. We've forgotten how much the pipes truly add." It is comments along that line that make me glad that the pipes ARE hooked up. Of course some of the sounds that the organ make really bug the heck out of me, but when the electronics are going full blast, even I don't notice them that much.   Maybe this answers your question :-)   Paul  
(back) Subject: Vernon de Tar From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 13:45:12 -0400   Does anyone know if Vernon de Tar is still living? I remember when he retired from the Ascension Church but recently thought of him as I passed = by the church as I do often since I live in the neighborhood. He was, if I remember correctly, Prof. of organ at Julliard, no? Just having thoughts is my old age. Thanks, Robert Bernardino Colasacco   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Vernon de Tar From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 14:12:07 -0400   Vernon, who was my teacher at Juilliard, died several years ago. His memorial service was held at Church of the Ascension, with Voices of Ascension singing for the service. The church was well filled with several generations of New York organists, and many from some distance away. On PipOrg-L, I did a report on the service, which included, by the way, the last chorus of King David, which Vernon's choir did on an annual basis, = and also a rather wonderful hymn written by Vernon. At that service, I sat = next to Bill Whitehead, who is also no longer with us.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 08, 2002 1:45 PM Subject: Vernon de Tar     > Does anyone know if Vernon de Tar is still living? I remember when he > retired from the Ascension Church but recently thought of him as I = passed by > the church as I do often since I live in the neighborhood. He was, if I > remember correctly, Prof. of organ at Julliard, no? > Just having thoughts is my old age. > Thanks, > Robert Bernardino Colasacco      
(back) Subject: Re: Vernon de Tar From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 14:47:01 -0400   My much-esteemed former teacher Vernon de Tar died several years ago, and = if I have it right, his ashes were deposited at Ascension Church, where his wife's already were. He spent years after retirement at Kendall-at- Longwood very near Longwood Gardens, at Kennett Square PA. He had taken his grand piano and also had a small tracker in his apartment there. He grew into a warm relationship with the folks at Longwood Gardens and also with David Schelat at First and Central Presb. Ch. in nearby Wilmington = DE.   David or the folks at Ascension Church or at AGO hq. could give you = the precise date of his death.   Karl E. Moyer LANCASTER PA   > From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 13:45:12 -0400 > To: "'pipechat@pipechat.org'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Vernon de Tar > > Does anyone know if Vernon de Tar is still living? I remember when he > retired from the Ascension Church but recently thought of him as I = passed by > the church as I do often since I live in the neighborhood. He was, if I > remember correctly, Prof. of organ at Julliard, no? > Just having thoughts is my old age. > Thanks, > Robert Bernardino Colasacco > > Robert B. Colasacco > Administrative Assistant/Secretary > Distinguished Colleagues > Population Council > One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza > New York, NY 10017 > Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 > Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 > Fax: (212) 755-6052 > e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org > Visit our web site: > www.popcouncil.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Vernon de Tar From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 15:14:54 -0400   Thank you. Robert       My much-esteemed former teacher Vernon de Tar died several years ago, and = if I have it right, his ashes were deposited at Ascension Church, where his wife's already were. Karl E. Moyer  
(back) Subject: Re: Sources for Leslie speaker info? From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 16:51:54 -0400   At 10:22 PM 07/07/2002 -0400, Charles wrote: >Anyway, does anyone have info on where to get parts and things for >Leslie speakers? Yup. I run Hamtech (the Hammond list), which deals with Leslies as much as with old Hammonds. I'd suggest subscribing and asking that group...pretty much guaranteed they can fix you up. If you'd like to give =   that a shot, let me know and I'll get you set up.   > The 147 is missing a few odds and ends, and the >other's amplifier got toasted (which has a lot to do with it's being >replaced.) 147s are pretty standard, no problem at all to get parts. You'll =   need to dig out the model number of the other Leslie so the group knows what they're dealing with. Leslie made several speakers for Conns.   If you don't already have the owner's manual or schematics for your 147, they can be downloaded from my Hamtech co-admin's site www.captain-foldback.com Both the owner's manual and the 122/147 service =   pamphlet are available in 2 zipped files running about 4.5 megs total.   Have fun! Ad ;->    
(back) Subject: Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 20:18:56 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 08, 2002 9:55 AM Subject: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG)     > > If I get a second lifetime, I shall spend it--all of it--there. Or > have I already spent a life there and thrill with a deep remembrance?   I spent five of the happiest years of my life in Oxford, so you are preaching to the converted here.   > And there was the Eagle and Child (or, irreverently, The Bird and > Baby), the pub where the Inklings (C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, > Charles Williams, inter alia) met and talked. I sat in their favorite > room and had the best steak pie of my life, with a pint (or three) of > local bitters, a warmish barely carbonated beer that had to be > vigorously pumped up from the depths   I have a particularly soft spot for the "Bird and Baby", because it was there, twenty-seven years ago, that I first met my wife. When we were students Tolkein was still around the place, although we did not know him personally. He was generally very scruffily dressed, and many would have mistaken him for a tramp.   I also remember when the Reiger was put in. The old organ was a Willis rebuilt by Harrison & Harrison, with the Great Organ in the Ruckpositiv. = I recall it as a rather gritty sounding instrument, and not I think one of = the inspired works of either Willis or Harrison. There was an impressive 32' Double Open Wood, placed either side of the west door of the cathedral, though somewhat to the detriment of the architecture; this has now been added to the Grove Organ in Tewkesbury. Christ Church originally contracted for a new organ with the American organbuilder Phelps & Associates of Erie, Pa. Unfortunately, Larry Phelps went bankrupt while building it, and the college then contracted with = Rieger instead. Mechanically speaking the instrument is probably one of Rieger's outstanding instruments, but tonally I find it a little disappointing. = The sound does not carry well in the room, in spite of the drastic loudening that was done by Rieger during the installation when this became apparent. The stop list suggests eighteenth-century French influence, but the = voicing is uncompromisingly North German, and furthermore it is lacking in some of the basic resources for accompanying the Anglican liturgy. It has been = much criticised visually because it is felt that the seventeenth-century Father Smith case was ruined by increasing its height to accommodate the Swell Organ. Nonetheless, especially when used as a recital instrument rather than for liturgical purposes, it was a considerable improvement on the previous instrument. I think the best instrument of all, however, was the temporary organ that was in use between the taking out of the old Willis-Harrison organ and the installation of the new Rieger. This was a two-manual Father Willis tracker of around a dozen stops, and was situated in the middle of the nave next to the choir. It carried beautifully in = the building and did a stunning job of accompanying the choir. I wonder what happened to it.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: PIPECHAT ON IRC From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 18:30:45 -0700   is NOW ... where IS everybody?   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: PIPECHAT ON IRC From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 21:39:43 -0400   At 06:30 PM 08/07/2002 -0700, Bud wrote: >... where IS everybody? Hode on....I'm comin...!   Have fun! Ad ;->        
(back) Subject: Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG) From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 21:54:12 -0400   Dear List,   Like John Speller, I have always found the Christ Church Rieger a big disappointment liturgically. It really is not much loved. Oxford has two other instruments known to me that I think are much more lovable. One is = the Frobenius at Queens, which I have only heard in recital, but thought would work well liturgically as well. The other is, surprise, surprise, the = Mander at Magdalen College = http://www.mander-organs.com/html/magdalen_college.html. I have heard Evensong there a number of times, and I hope that choir = remains as fabulous as it was on those occasions, and I hope the great musical tradition remains. This organ was voiced on site in a most amazing way. = When a stop was finished, it was used by prearrangement during that day's Evensong, usually in a few verses of the Psalm, and John Mander and others listened to the balances out in the building. The approach worked wonderfully well. Any who have seen the movie "Shadowlands," all about C. = S. Lewis, will have seen and heard this organ (and sometimes choir) = throughout the movie. The opening scene is of the unusual stone case, which you can = see on the website.   End of commercial.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com       ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 08, 2002 9:18 PM Subject: Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG)        
(back) Subject: Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 21:50:36 -0500   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 08, 2002 8:54 PM Subject: Re: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: Part Four (LONG)     Any who have seen the movie "Shadowlands," all about C. S. > Lewis, will have seen and heard this organ (and sometimes choir) throughout > the movie.   The Willis organ in the Sheldonian Theatre also appears in this movie. = This was never a very successful instrument, and has now, I believe, been replaced with an electronic, although the case by Sir Thomas Jackson is still in position. In the movie, however, the Sheldonian organ never sounded so good. I think actually what they did was to show a picture of the Sheldonian organ and dub the sound of the Mander at Magdalen College over it!   One thing that "Shadowlands" reminded me of that I had quite forgotten was how wonderful the bells of Oxford sound from Christ Church Meadow on a Sunday morning.   John Speller