PipeChat Digest #2956 - Wednesday, July 10, 2002
 
Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
PipeChat members
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Oxon and other shires (teddibly off topic and naughty)
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
RE: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "vdbarton@erols.com" <vdbarton@erols.com>
RE: Philadelphia convention
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Philly AGO
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Moller thumb piston needed
  by "Keith B Williams" <keithbwill@juno.com>
Re: Philadelphia convention
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Philadelphia convention
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Good organs in lousy rooms
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Fur clad rooms
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 06:11:37 -0700 (PDT)   Ross sez:   >And by the way, I play the bagpipes, so don't even think of making any implied criticism of that wonderful octopus. Ross     --God forbid I should show disrespect to the pipes! My father's mother was named Virginia MacFadyen and she would strike me dead from the Great Beyond if I did so.   MacFadyen is a sept of Maclane of Lochbuie. I'd wear Maclane of Lochbuie myself, but it makes me look like a Thermos. :)   By the way, if I'm not mistaken, you don't PLAY the bagpipes. You PLAY a kist o' whistles. You SKIRL the pipes, n'est-ce pas?       Jon   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: PipeChat members From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:20:01 -0400   In my "report" on the OHS Convention, I'm sorry to say I forgot to mention meeting some very nice PipeChat people, both at a small gathering in the Exhibit Hall, and at other times. I had met before David Scribner, = Malcolm Wechsler, Bill van Pelt, Jon Habermaas, Sand Lawn, and did meet several others, including Tim Bovard, TommyLee Whitlock, Paul Emmons, Peter Storandt, Travis Evans. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Oxon and other shires (teddibly off topic and naughty) From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 09:29:14 -0500   Back in my youth I wrote a lot of limericks, and all this talk of "Oxon" reminded me of one of them that deals with English counties:   A guide from Oxon made advance T'ward a luscious young tourist from France; If he'd got to her gams By the time they'd reached Cambs, Can you guess where he'd gotten by Hants?   Please return to you regular programming, and my apologies. RJL  
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 07:43:04 -0700 (PDT)   Douglas Morgan wrote: > If you have a padded cell for a church, why bother > with a good pipe organ? > > To sum it up, the good acoustics contributes 90% of > the effectiveness of a successful organ installation. > I have certainly not heard as many organs in as many venues as most = chatters. However, I did hear our little 19-rank, "Orgue de choeur"-style Casavant = in its original location, a small padded cell. I would have to say that it was = more effective than the alternatives (bad pipe organ? good electronic organ? piano?). It was truly a padded cell, with thick carpet throughout, = acoustic tile on the back wall and ceiling, and padded pews -- dead as a doornail.   I am, of course, glad that the acoustics in its current home are better, = though not Gothic by any means.   Michael Corzine told the story at the Presbyterian Worship and Music = conference at Montreat a few weeks ago. He is consulting for a church acquiring a = new pipe organ from Fisk. Fisk would not sign a contract until an acoustician = was contracted. The acoustician first recommended ceiling improvements = costing around $100,000. The church did not have such funds allocated, and rather = than forego the improvement, Fisk proposed cutting 6 ranks from the organ. = Later the acoustician (as mechanical engineer) recommended changes to the = ductwork for heating and air conditioning to reduce the ambient noise in the room, costing around $160,000. Again, Fisk proposed reducing the size of the = organ to fund the change. (Dr. Corzine likened these reductions to "giving away babies".)   I assume that there are other organ builders with the same committment to = the "90% Effectiveness" factor.   I don't have good notes of exactly what Dr. Corzine was saying, but it = seemed like he was emphasizing the "resonance" of a room over the = "reverberation". I think I understand this more intuitively than intellectually. Is it = possible that our Casavant was (allowed to be) built in such a way that it managed = to "resonate" (to some extent) with its original room, padding and all? I = would guess the room sat around 250 people. The organ was really "just enough".   Mark Koontz     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:48:59 EDT   Dear D. Keith:   A good example of what I'm talking about is the new Reuter in the Presbyterian Church in Seattle. John Weaver did his level best to make this huge organ sound well. The fault was not with the organ, but the acoustical treatment of the church. The walls were covered with what = looked like indoor-outdoor carpeting clear to the ceiling. A long time parishoner sat just in front of me for the concert, and opined that this organ didn't =   sound any better than the old one! OUCH! The seats were padded, the floor covered in carpet, and the ceiling acoustic tiles. The voicing team must have been tearing their hair out by the roots. Here is a nearly $2M instrument that will never be able to sing in an invironment like that. This organ in St. James Cathedral would have been magnificent, but not in a deliberately over dead room. I was very frustrated trying to reconcile "what could have been." The organ's too loud group won on this round. Extremely = disappointing!   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:53:18 +0100   At 06:11 10/07/02 -0700, you wrote:   >By the way, if I'm not mistaken, you don't PLAY the bagpipes. You PLAY >a kist o' whistles. You SKIRL the pipes, n'est-ce pas? > >Jon   Jon, I've really enjoyed reading about your adventures in Scotland and England (haste ye back!). I've always thought that the 'skirl' of the bagpipes referred to the sound the pipes make, and I do not recall = hearing, even when I lived in Scotland, the playing of the pipes referred to as 'skirling the pipes' - but you may well be right (perhaps it's auld Scottish).   My own opinion on the best way to appreciate the bagpipes is to hear a = lone piper in a Scottish glen at dusk - it's awesome. Bagpipes should not be played indoors!   Cheryl     http://www.copemanhart.co.uk    
(back) Subject: RE: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:08:44 -0400   There is a piper who practices on the Grove Street Pier on the Hudson on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. I assume his neighbors have taken to = asking him to not practice in his apartment. I must say, as much as I like the bagpipes it is truely a break for us listeners when he takes one. And = this is outdoors, mind you, with much traffic passing on the West Side Highway in lower Manhattan where once in the not too distant south rose the twin towers. But if I hear Amazing Grace one more time I'm going to scream. I have come to actually despise hearing what once was one of my favorite hymns. nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn= n nnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn= n nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn    
(back) Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "vdbarton@erols.com" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:25:34 -0400     With respect to Cheryl, I disagree=2E Each Autumn, at the Washington National Cathedral, they do a Sunday afternoon service called "Kirkin' o' the Tartan," with MANY pipes and drums=2E That sound in the vast space of=   the cathedral is truly awesome and quite unforgettable=2E I'm sure Cheryl= 's point is entirely well-taken where any indoor space of less monumental proportions is concerned=2E As to the linguistic niceties surrounding "skirling," I shall defer to our resident New Zealander of Scottish ancestry, Ross Wards=2E Ross? What say ye?       Original Message: ----------------- From: Cheryl C Hart info@copemanhart=2Eco=2Euk Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:53:18 +0100 To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!     At 06:11 10/07/02 -0700, you wrote:   >By the way, if I'm not mistaken, you don't PLAY the bagpipes=2E You PLAY=   >a kist o' whistles=2E You SKIRL the pipes, n'est-ce pas? > >Jon   Jon, I've really enjoyed reading about your adventures in Scotland and=20 England (haste ye back!)=2E I've always thought that the 'skirl' of the=20=   bagpipes referred to the sound the pipes make, and I do not recall hearing= ,=20 even when I lived in Scotland, the playing of the pipes referred to as=20 'skirling the pipes' - but you may well be right (perhaps it's auld=20 Scottish)=2E   My own opinion on the best way to appreciate the bagpipes is to hear a lon= e=20 piper in a Scottish glen at dusk - it's awesome=2E Bagpipes should not be= =20 played indoors!   Cheryl     http://www=2Ecopemanhart=2Eco=2Euk     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www=2Epipechat=2Eorg List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat=2Eorg Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat=2Eorg     -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: RE: Philadelphia convention From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 12:25:34 -0400   I'd like to know what the up-keep of this organ would cost!     I would like to thank "David" for his positive comments on the Wanamaker organ and I beleive that I speak fo the rest of the crew also. These men put in countless hours over the = last   few years and especially the last few weeks to insure the instrument was = in the condition that you heard it in at the convention. Many listeners don't =   realize the vast amount of work to restore, repair, and just maintain an organ of this size.  
(back) Subject: Philly AGO From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 12:26:10 -0400   My convention impressions: hot, muggy, no air-conditioning in 2/3 of the events, and c2000 people made for a "hurry up and wait" situation, along with no time for a decent meal due to the bus schedule. I did hear some great organs and performers though, and the hotel also was great, as was my roommate Merry Foxworth of this list. Monday - arrived via Amtrak from Worcester MA, on time after a 6 1/2 hour ride, time enough to register at the hotel and pick up my AGO stuff, eat 1/2 leftover sandwich, then to the RC cathedral for the opening "gathering". The organ, a Tellers, the choir of St. Thomas, NYC, John Weaver, and the Brass group were well-received, and I was glad to have walked there, accompanied by a Past Dean of the SouthWest FL AGO Chapter which I joined recently, whom I met by chance, and had met once before in FL. My roomate and I did not meet until later nor have the same schedule, so we went our own ways all week, got take-out food and ate in our room in a rush most of the time. Tuesday I was very tired from the previous 2 weeks actvities, so sorrily slept late and skipped some of the events to rest up. I attended St. Peter's Episcopal Rising Star recital by Brett Maguire of our Region I, he played Vierne on a nice E. M. Skinner, followed by a worship service featuring Murray Somerville's RCCM Teen Youth Choir who sang well, encumbered in their robes which must have been stifling, this was the = first indication of the rest of the week's heat, the high-backed pews with their doors didn't help, and the cardboard fans we were given only pushed the = hot air around a bit. My Workshop of the day was Matthew Bellochio's talk and slide show of a History of Organ Casework, 1 1/2 hours of well-prepared material which covered the history, in comparison with the housing styles of the time periods, and the architecture of churches i.e. Federal Style, Greek Revival etc. Wednesday was my day to be in Lansdale PA at Cherry Rhodes recital on a large Ott tracker. The organ and concert were well-received, she played Guillou which is not my "cup of tea" but I was nontheless very impressed, the recital was a workhorse which she did 4 different times due to the group schedule, as did the other morning performers. Then we heard a wonderful Mander at the Chestnut Hill Presbyterian Church, I had heard and played this organ just after its installation, and love it. Hatsumi Miaru did a splendid recital featuring different eras of music, from Frescobaldi amd Bach to Alain. This organ is very versatile and handled it all well. Plus both locations were air-conditioned, a real plus! My Workshop was on German Organs, mostly from the 1700's in America by Pennsylvania organbuilders, presented by Christoph Linde. I attended this workshop in preparation for hearing some of these instruments at next year's OHS Convention in the Lancaster PA area. Wednesday evening was another stifler, at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian, with Robert Plympton on a huge 98 rank Rieger. I enjoyed the Franck Grand = Piece Symphonique the most. Heard some of the rest from outside, which was 90 degrees and not a breeze stirring. Kudoes to these performers who had to play in this weather! Thursday was Girard College with Jane Parker-Smith, a stunning recital on what I think is one of the best pipe organs in this country. Another stifling day for the Fourth of July, it hit 100 degrees, but I was mesmerized by her performance and that E. M. Skinner! I attended the Choral Repertoire Enrichment Session with Cliff Hill, basically a singalong Anthem Reading with piano accompaniment. The Workshop of the day for me was Thomas Chase of Regina, Ontario, Canada, on Organists and the Catholic Conumdrum: Signs of a Renaissance. I had met Tom several times = in Canada, and since I had been Music Minister at an RC church in MA for the past 3 years, and not being catholic myself, wondered what he had to say. His notes were based on a survey done with catholic musicians. I did not see much of a renaissance from his results, they seemed rather static, which were about what I expected. He dropped a bomb when he said that Raymond Daveluy of St. Joseph Oratory in Montreal had recently been dismissed by the Church Administration, and later added to me that his Associate Rachel Lauren resigned immediately when she heard of this. What a shocking development! Since I had a 10pm ticket for Wanamaker, and had to be up and leave very early the next morning for Princeton, and had heard the Wanamaker several times previously, I opted not to go out again, but watched the Phil. festivities and fireworks on TV. Friday in Princeton University Chapel was a highlight of the week for me, with Alan Morrison playing my "favorite" Durufle Suite and a great Cochereau piece, and the stunning Aeolian-Skinner/Mander, along with the chapel itself. The New England Spiritual Ensemble sang in a good acoustic setting, mostly acapella, with interesting arrangements of spirituals. = The Workshop this day was with Bruce Neswick on Hymn Improvisations, he played his suggestions for practice on an old and nice Austin at St. Luke & Epiphany Episcopal, with a large contigent of convention-goers listening. Friday night was at Irvine Auditorium, a spectacular setting which we did not visit during the OHS Convention held also the Fourth of July week several years ago, as the Aud was under construction at the time. The large Austin played by Richard Morris and the composite and versatile keyboard structure used by Hector Oliveira produced a wide and impressive variety of sound. I only wish and hope that the two big conventions, OHS and AGO do not overlap again as they did this year. There were many people who attended both, who obviously had to miss parts of one. And I understand the need = to include a heavy schedule to please everyone's choices, but is there also a need to so totally tire one out, if one wishes to attend all the events which are desired? I felt sorry for the people who had signed up for public transportation instead of riding the convention busses. On the other hand, I met a lot of people, mostly only once, whom I knew, and greeting old friends was nice. Many people at both conventions asked me about the Worcester MA Memorial Auditorium Kimball, simply, it remains "under wraps" and protected by a partition from the rest of the auditorium which has been partitioned off with temporary office cubicles, and the state juvenile court is in the basement. The state is leasing the = building from the city on a "temporary" basis. so there is no change in the status of the 1933 Kimball organ. Judy Ollikkala    
(back) Subject: Moller thumb piston needed From: "Keith B Williams" <keithbwill@juno.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:58:41 -0500   We are rebuilding a 1951 Moller console, and need to add one thumb piston. Barrel is 5/8" diameter by 7/8" long, connected by a rod to the contact assembly which mounts on the rear of the front key bed. Let's make a deal!   Keith Williams Buzard Pipe Organ Builders Champaign, IL   www.Buzardorgans.com   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Re: Philadelphia convention From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 13:05:54 EDT   Dear Robert:   Most if not all the work done on the Wanamaker is probably volunteer. Paying these men a regular rate would probably cost several times the original cost of the organ per year. The money they do collect probably goes for materials alone, and a curator who directs the volunteer efforts. An instrument so huge would cost into the seven figures every year. I don't know this for sure, but it must be safe to say that John Wanamaker put nearly all his money into the organ he loved so much.   What is interesting to note, the Philadelphia, New York, and the New Jersey Atlantic City organs were All built just before or during the Great Depression. Nearly 1/3 of the Atlantic City organ was cut from the original plans for over 600 ranks. Approximately 140 ranks are still playing since the 1940's. This makes the Wanamaker the largest playing organ, and Atlantic City the largest organ ever built. We hope someday to live to hear the whole thing once more peal forth. You certainly don't go to a poor guy to raise money for any one of these. Where did all the money come from? Well until the 1950's taxes were 1 1/2% of an income. With taxes at 43% Federal, and 6-10 % state and all those so called "necessary social programs" it's easy to see why the money dried up. Things inflate and cost more now because everything is FREE. To see a difference, IMHO we need to reverse this trend.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: RE: Philadelphia convention From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 13:14:23 -0400   I know where the money "used to" come from but I was curious to know NOW what the cost is. I had a feeling it would be an astronomically high = figure and couldn't figure out where such money would come from today. Maybe = Martha Stewart? or Ken What's-his-name of Enron? or even WorldCom? So, do you = know for a fact it's all volunteer work? I've never seen nor heard the = instrument 'cause I've never been to Philly but I think it worth the trip one day = just to hear it. From NYC to Philly it's only 2 hours by train, I think. I = don't drive. Thanks Ron. Robert   -  
(back) Subject: RE: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:35:05 -0500   We have used a quartet of pipers to play our ceremonial processional and recessional music at our two annual commencement programs inside our university chapel for many years. The effect is quite remarakable, as = David suggests -- every eye turns to the sound and there is silence among the audience. Often it's the best part of the program. The great Holtkamp smiles down on the whole shebang....   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: vdbarton@erols.com [mailto:vdbarton@erols.com] Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 10:26 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!       With respect to Cheryl, I disagree. Each Autumn, at the Washington National Cathedral, they do a Sunday afternoon service called "Kirkin' o' the Tartan," with MANY pipes and drums. That sound in the vast space of the cathedral is truly awesome and quite unforgettable. I'm sure Cheryl's point is entirely well-taken where any indoor space of less monumental proportions is concerned. As to the linguistic niceties surrounding "skirling," I shall defer to our resident New Zealander of Scottish ancestry, Ross Wards. Ross? What say ye?       Original Message: ----------------- From: Cheryl C Hart info@copemanhart.co.uk Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:53:18 +0100 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!     At 06:11 10/07/02 -0700, you wrote:   >By the way, if I'm not mistaken, you don't PLAY the bagpipes. You PLAY >a kist o' whistles. You SKIRL the pipes, n'est-ce pas? > >Jon   Jon, I've really enjoyed reading about your adventures in Scotland and England (haste ye back!). I've always thought that the 'skirl' of the bagpipes referred to the sound the pipes make, and I do not recall = hearing, even when I lived in Scotland, the playing of the pipes referred to as 'skirling the pipes' - but you may well be right (perhaps it's auld Scottish).   My own opinion on the best way to appreciate the bagpipes is to hear a = lone piper in a Scottish glen at dusk - it's awesome. Bagpipes should not be played indoors!   Cheryl     http://www.copemanhart.co.uk     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web.com/ .       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Good organs in lousy rooms From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 21:55:29 +0100   Oh my!   Ron Severin opens up a nest of vipers AND hornets.....stay clear of = religion I say! (Do Vipers have nests? I know they lay eggs)   Let's take the organ thing first. Actually, Leeds Parish Church is a = very large instrument (little extension or duplexing except on the Pedal = and the big reeds) in a quite small church with horrendous acoustics due = to galleries, carpets and a strange shape. The organ was Hill, then = Abbot & Smith by re-build (with bits of Schulze in a seperate gallery = instrument) THEN seriously worked over by Harrison and = Harrison.....supremely well IMHO. Later additions have been confined to = upperwork and a few tonal modification, plus getting the Schulze = pipework incorporated into the main case and made playable.   It is actually a very, very fine instrument for the building and, it was = on this organ during my formative years, that I would travel home on a = proverbial cloud after hearing the likes of Germani, Dupre, Marchand and = Flor Peeters.....performances which etched into my memory.=20   However, going back further in time, there was a UK tradition of = excellence in parish churches with poor acoustics. I refer of course to = the 18th century Snetzler organs and those beautiful instruments by = William Hill from the mid 19th century.....never overblown or = over-regulated, they sang very naturally and with great refinement.   When Harrisons created the Anglican sound, the wind pressures were never = excessive except perhaps for an Open Diapason 1 with leathered lips = (which no-one ever uses!) and close toned reeds on pressures of 10-25" = wg. Thus, the fluework is seldom over-powering even in a bad acoustic; = especially when it is well regulated for the building.   Of course, the UK also has wonderful rooms and, it is in these that H & = H organs perhaps lose something or lack something. Father Willis organs = seem to fare rather better in big acoustics.   But make no mistake, there are many, many instruments in "dull as = ditchwater" acoustics which sound really rather good.   Interestingly, although I have passed the building in the flesh, I have = never heard the organ of the Riverside Church NY. I suspect that this = is a rather good instrument, but the difference (judging by the = recordings) between A-S and H&H is in the refinement of the chorus = work.....perhaps someday I will be able to judge for myself.   Strangely enough, I actualy like the organ at the Festival Hall in = London.....especially the fluework. It is the reeds which spoil it all = when they bark into life, but even then, they are not as bad as reeds by = Flentrop at De Doelen in Rotterdam.   On the religious question, I suspect that traditional church theology is = now so "out on a limb", normal people have abandoned it long since. = Perhaps the authority of the established churches is too rooted in = pseudo-science and romantic perceptions......just a personal view you = understand!   Colin Mitchell UK              
(back) Subject: Fur clad rooms From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 22:15:13 +0100   Ah!   Now this is a DIFFERENT problem, which is possibly what Ron Severin was = hinting at.....I don't know.   If the voicing is "refined" in the Snetzler manner, or to take it to the = extreme, in the voicing of Samuel Green (who exported a few instrument = to the USA I believe), then it cannot naturally "carry" very far. I think that, when I referred to "lousy rooms", I had the sort of = building found in the UK.....no natural resonance due to shape, roof = height and the like, but still with hard reflective surfaces.   The problem is, you then have to blow hard but refine it to the n-th = degree.....in fact, a neo-Wurlitzer.   Anyway, I like Wurlitzers!   Once carpet tiles, hanging furry dice, soft toys, mohair cassocks, = velour ceiling tiles and felt covered Bibles are = introduced.....well.....goodbye organ tone, choir tone and any other = tone.   Still, we DO have the Festival Hall, which must be close!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK