PipeChat Digest #2957 - Thursday, July 11, 2002
 
[Fwd: Sad news]
  by "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com>
Jason Ranton Obituary
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my!
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
New Book on Durufl=E9
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
GOOD  ORGANS  IN  LOUSY  ROOMS
  by "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com>
Re: Good organs in lousy rooms
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Moller Tracker Bar Chests (X-Posted)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Jason Ranton Obituary
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: [Fwd: Sad news] From: "Mack" <mack02445@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 17:33:50 -0400   To those of you who may know Ben but not be on the list I am posting this here. Mack   -------- Original Message -------- Subject: Sad news Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:56:54 -0500 From: David Kelzenberg <dkelzenb@BLUE.WEEG.UIOWA.EDU> Reply-To: David Kelzenberg <david-kelzenberg@uiowa.edu> To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu   Friends--   I know that many of you will be saddened to hear that my friend, colleague, and co-owner of these lists, Ben Chi, lost his wife of 35 years earlier this week. Ginger died suddenly and unexpectedly at home. As you might imagine, Ben's life is currently in a state of turmoil. My thoughts and prayers are with Ben during this difficult time.   Ben has been here since "Day One," and it was through his interest and generosity (and that of his employers at U of Albany) that these listservs came into being. We all owe Ben a debt of gratitude; were it not for him PIPORG-L and HPSCHD-L would certainly not exist as they do today.   I know Ben would not want a fuss made over him, particularly here where such discussion would not be "on topic." But, for those who might be moved to send Ben a note of sympathy or encouragement, his e-mail address is <bechi@bechi.org> (and I know you will be understanding if he is slow to respond).   David C. Kelzenberg Co-Owner, PIPORG-L/HPSCHD-L   :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::      
(back) Subject: Jason Ranton Obituary From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:28:03 EDT   It is with great sadness that I inform you of the death of Jason Ranton, = age 32, who died at his residence July 6, 2002. Funeral services were held = today at First Baptist Church in Waco, Texas, with a subsequent memorial service =   this afternoon at First United Methodist Church in Waxahachie, Texas.   Jason began his church music ministry at age 12 with Sardis United = Methodist Church in Waxahachie, Texas. His other appointments after high school graduation were with First UMC of Corsicana, Texas, and later with First = UMC of Waxahachie. Jason attended Baylor University, majoring in journalism. After = graduation, he was employed in his chosen profession with major publications but was equally known for his considerable keyboard skills. Jason served as = organist for First Baptist Church in Waco until his appointment as organist and = Dean, College of Communications at Christ Church Episcopal in Plano, Texas (near =   Dallas). He was co-chair for the 2003 American Guild of Organist Regional = to be held in Waco, Texas. Often sought as a clinician in organ = improvisation, Jason was very active in the National Baylor Organ Conference and Pipe = Organ Encounters. He is survived by his parents, James and Jo Ann Ranton of Waxahachie, Texas. Memorials may be made to the First United Methodist Church Organ Fund, Waxahachie, Texas. ~30~   ~ Jason Ranton failed to show up for a wedding Saturday afternoon at = Christ Church. He was discovered dead in his apartment by authorities. Cause of death = has not been determined but authorities say it appears to be from natural = causes as there was no evidence of foul play. Jason was a diabetic. He was also =   the consummate musician and will be sorely missed.   Will someone with posting privileges to Piporg-L please forward this = message to their list.   Prayerfully, Jim Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:32:44 -0400   On 7/10/02 11:08 AM, "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> = wrote:   > There is a piper who practices on the Grove Street Pier on the Hudson on > Saturday and Sunday afternoons.   Robert: Have him give me a call. I think I can help. (Seriously.) Ours is a tourist block, and, within some limitations (kilt, etc.), I might = even get the Restaurant Association to PAY him to make noise a couple days a week, several hours per day. Well, that's a stretch, but who knows?   Alan Freed, Saint Luke's Church, 212 246 3540 most any time    
(back) Subject: Re: Riegers and Regals and Bagpipes, oh my! From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 12:22:13 +1200   No, you do not skirl the pipes. Look up skirl in a Scots dictionary. It's = a totally inappropriate word for the melodious, resonant sound of a good set of pipes.   From the font the email uses, I'm sure if your "Maclane" is actually Mac = Ian or meant to be Mac Lane? Which? In any case, I must confess I don't know that name. To me, it's either McIan, or Maclean.   Best wishes, Ross     >Ross sez: > >>And by the way, I play the bagpipes, so don't even think of making any >implied criticism of that wonderful octopus. >Ross > > >--God forbid I should show disrespect to the pipes! My father's mother >was named Virginia MacFadyen and she would strike me dead from the >Great Beyond if I did so. > >MacFadyen is a sept of Maclane of Lochbuie. I'd wear Maclane of >Lochbuie myself, but it makes me look like a Thermos. :) > >By the way, if I'm not mistaken, you don't PLAY the bagpipes. You PLAY >a kist o' whistles. You SKIRL the pipes, n'est-ce pas?      
(back) Subject: New Book on Durufl=E9 From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 20:12:04 -0400   Ronald Ebrecht's new book that collects essays about Maurice Durufl=E9 and his music, and also one about Marie-Madeleine Durufl=E9 written by her sister, is now available on the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill  
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 17:40:56 -0700 (PDT)   As I said before, a good organ will make itself known even in a louzy room.   One other example I know of was at St. Richard's Catholic Church in Jackson, Mississippi.   When the organ was finished, there was so much resonance and reverberation that speech became all garbeled and could not be understood. They installed acoustical tile on the ceiling of the side ailes and discreetly installed some on the walls to cut down on the reverberation. The building now has only 6 seconds reverberation. The organist played part of the Reubke Sonata for me. The organ is completely free-standing on a trancept gallery. Even the swell shades are there finished like the pews. The organ? A 15-rank M=F6ller two-manual. You would have thought it was a 4-manual, 100-rank instrument.   On the other hand, St. Luke's Methodist Church in Oklahoma City has a 4-manual, 95-rank G. Donald Harrison =C6olian-Skinner. Even though you can see it standing there with its exposed pipes, it sounds like it is across the street. The room is so dead, I swear that I can hear the room slurp when a chord is released.   If we could switch those two organs, just think what we would have!   D. Keith Morgan     --- Mark Koontz <markkoontz@yahoo.com> wrote: > Douglas Morgan wrote: > > If you have a padded cell for a church, why bother > > with a good pipe organ? > > > > To sum it up, the good acoustics contributes 90% > of > > the effectiveness of a successful organ > installation. > > > I have certainly not heard as many organs in as many > venues as most chatters. > However, I did hear our little 19-rank, "Orgue de > choeur"-style Casavant in its > original location, a small padded cell. I would > have to say that it was more > effective than the alternatives (bad pipe organ? > good electronic organ? > piano?). It was truly a padded cell, with thick > carpet throughout, acoustic > tile on the back wall and ceiling, and padded pews > -- dead as a doornail. > > I am, of course, glad that the acoustics in its > current home are better, though > not Gothic by any means. > > Michael Corzine told the story at the Presbyterian > Worship and Music conference > at Montreat a few weeks ago. He is consulting for a > church acquiring a new > pipe organ from Fisk. Fisk would not sign a > contract until an acoustician was > contracted. The acoustician first recommended > ceiling improvements costing > around $100,000. The church did not have such funds > allocated, and rather than > forego the improvement, Fisk proposed cutting 6 > ranks from the organ. Later > the acoustician (as mechanical engineer) recommended > changes to the ductwork > for heating and air conditioning to reduce the > ambient noise in the room, > costing around $160,000. Again, Fisk proposed > reducing the size of the organ > to fund the change. (Dr. Corzine likened these > reductions to "giving away > babies".) > > I assume that there are other organ builders with > the same committment to the > "90% Effectiveness" factor. > > I don't have good notes of exactly what Dr. Corzine > was saying, but it seemed > like he was emphasizing the "resonance" of a room > over the "reverberation". I > think I understand this more intuitively than > intellectually. Is it possible > that our Casavant was (allowed to be) built in such > a way that it managed to > "resonate" (to some extent) with its original room, > padding and all? I would > guess the room sat around 250 people. The organ was > really "just enough". > > Mark Koontz > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free > http://sbc.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:51:31 -0500   I do not adhere to the view that an organ cannot sound good in a lousy acoustic. It is more the case that the reverse is true -- viz., that even = a poor instrument can sound good in a fine acoustical setting. The fact = that most churches with lousy acoustics have organs that do not sound good is more a commentary on many organbuilders' inability to scale and voice instruments to suit the room. Nineteenth-century organbuilders like Hook = & Hastings certainly knew how to make an instrument sound good in the worst = of acoustic environments, and we at Quimby Pipe Organs pride ourselves on having built quite a few organs that sound excellent in spite of the acoustics of the room, to some extent by studying what builders like Hook = & Hastings did. Indeed, it is hard to find an organ by a major nineteenth-century builder that doesn't sound good even in a sound = absorbent room. The truth, as they say, is out there; the problem is that few take the trouble to learn from the truth that is out there.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 21:17:54 -0400   I must strongly support John Speller in what he has written below. Anyone = at OHS in Chicago, or any other OHS convention, for that matter, will have heard amazing things coming from little 19th century instruments (one manual, even!) in really bad rooms, filling the building in a most satisfactory way, even to leading a large and full voiced congregation in hymns, also proved at OHS, where a hymn is always sung at each recital = (and not without good reason!). Anyway, those who write that an organ cannot sound good in a dead room have never been to Trinity Church, Copley = Square, in Boston. More than 200 people show up there every Friday for the noon Organ recital, and it is not because the organ sounds bad! THERE is a very large and very DEAD room, and an instrument that sounds magnificent! = Anyone for Scaling, Voicing, proper Wind Pressures, and Finishing? Hooray for = Mike Quimby and crew for knowing and caring about these things, where too many don't.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com (We too care about these things!!)   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 8:51 PM Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS     > I do not adhere to the view that an organ cannot sound good in a lousy > acoustic. It is more the case that the reverse is true -- viz., that = even a > poor instrument can sound good in a fine acoustical setting. The fact that > most churches with lousy acoustics have organs that do not sound good is > more a commentary on many organbuilders' inability to scale and voice > instruments to suit the room. Nineteenth-century organbuilders like = Hook & > Hastings certainly knew how to make an instrument sound good in the = worst of > acoustic environments, and we at Quimby Pipe Organs pride ourselves on > having built quite a few organs that sound excellent in spite of the > acoustics of the room, to some extent by studying what builders like = Hook & > Hastings did. Indeed, it is hard to find an organ by a major > nineteenth-century builder that doesn't sound good even in a sound absorbent > room. The truth, as they say, is out there; the problem is that few = take > the trouble to learn from the truth that is out there. > > John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 18:35:34 -0700   Hooray for John! Hooray for Quimby! Hooray for Hook & Hastings   The truth is out there all right, and it ain't rocket science, folks: broaden the scales of your 8's, rein in your trebles, and strengthen your 16' tone.   There are many 19th century organs in dead rooms in the Midwest where the ONLY 16' Pedal stop is a 16' Double Open Wood of ENORMOUS scale (enormous by our standards, anyway).   EVERY time I played one of those organs, I'd think to myself, "WHY, oh WHY can't 21st century voicers make principals and flutes that SING like that? Is voicing REALLY 50% alchemy and 50% sorcery? Couldn't these pipes be MEASURED and the SCALES taken so that SOMEBODY could reproduce this sound?"   There are VERY few GOOD 19th century organs where every single stop ISN'T a thing of beauty, right down to the Keraulophone ... EVERY stop has a function, EVERY stop blends, EVERY combination balances.   Hmmm ... let's see ... generous scales, relatively low wind-pressure, slider chests, tracker action, encasement (though not always) ... guess it really ISN'T rocket science.   Cheers,   Bud   "John L. Speller" wrote: > > I do not adhere to the view that an organ cannot sound good in a lousy > acoustic. It is more the case that the reverse is true -- viz., that = even a > poor instrument can sound good in a fine acoustical setting. The fact = that > most churches with lousy acoustics have organs that do not sound good is > more a commentary on many organbuilders' inability to scale and voice > instruments to suit the room. Nineteenth-century organbuilders like = Hook & > Hastings certainly knew how to make an instrument sound good in the = worst of > acoustic environments, and we at Quimby Pipe Organs pride ourselves on > having built quite a few organs that sound excellent in spite of the > acoustics of the room, to some extent by studying what builders like = Hook & > Hastings did. Indeed, it is hard to find an organ by a major > nineteenth-century builder that doesn't sound good even in a sound = absorbent > room. The truth, as they say, is out there; the problem is that few = take > the trouble to learn from the truth that is out there. > > John Speller > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "douglas morgan" <dkmorgan76209@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:05:20 -0700 (PDT)   Bud wrote: Is voicing REALLY 50% alchemy and 50% sorcery? Couldn't these pipes be MEASURED and the SCALES taken so that SOMEBODY could reproduce this sound?"   We can and we have! Any voicer worth his salt can take a set of pipes and duplicate the sound, and a good pipemaker can take a 69=A2 ruler and duplicate the scale. At =C6olian-Skinner, we tried to be as consistent as possible in voicing. Every Principal I ever voiced was done the same way as every other Principal. The only difference was in scaling. They sounded entirely different according to the acoustical properties of the room. Some were exposed; others were buried in a chamber. They were all the same in the voicing room. In the church, they're all different.   For the third time, let me say that I am not saying that a good organ cannot make a good sound in a dead room. Many do. I know of one organ by a well-known mid-western builder in a glorious building with 5 seconds reverberation. Even in that wonderful building, you know what you are hearing. They might as well have a Hammond.   Good organs can sound nice in dead rooms; lousy organs can sound pretty good (and are quite often saved) in resonant rooms. However, a good organ in a resonant building produces an emotional experience that you simply cannot get in a dead room.   D. Keith Morgan   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free http://sbc.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Good organs in lousy rooms From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 23:12:03 EDT     --part1_128.1421a733.2a5e5183_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Acoustics are very important to an organ, but a good organ building can = still make a fine instrument in a dead room. I've heard many.   Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_128.1421a733.2a5e5183_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Acoustics are very important to an organ, but a = good organ building can still make a fine instrument in a dead room.&nbsp; = I've heard many.<BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_128.1421a733.2a5e5183_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Moller Tracker Bar Chests (X-Posted) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 00:15:23 -0500   Allo,   Anyone got a "quick and dirty" web page URL that has a diagram of the old Moller Tracker bar Chests?   Thanky!   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: Jason Ranton Obituary From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 00:37:06 -0500   I've just gotten home today from Texas. I grew up in Corsicana, = Texas, and although was already well introduced to the pipe organ, it was Jason Ranton that began teaching me at the age of 14 how to make music on it. = He was only 19 and a sophomore at Baylor when we began lessons. He gave me a great appreciation for not only all the knobs and switches that so fascinated me, but for all the unseen parts of an organ that make it work. Jason is the reason I am an organist and organ technician today. I was one of seven pallbearers today, but there were clearly many others that were close to Jason and could have been given such an honor. The two services were certainly necessary, due to the large number of visitors. Even the small Methodist church in Waxahachie was packed for = the "small" service. He was buried in the small town of Sardis when he began his short career in church music. I could write for pages about Jason, his talents, his always positive outlook on life, and the many people he influenced, but I will simply say that if you did not have the pleasure of meeting him, you missed knowing a truly wonderful and amazing person. Allways a showman, for his last performance at Christ Church in = Plano, Jason wore his blue and white striped seersucker suit, with a red bowtie, and played the Washington Post March for a postlude, complete with drums = and cymbals. The congregation stayed to hear the entire thing, and roared = with applause at the end. What a great note to finish on! We should all be so lucky. Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.geocities.com/organwebring The Organ Classifieds http://www.organclassifieds.com   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 6:28 PM Subject: Jason Ranton Obituary     > It is with great sadness that I inform you of the death of Jason Ranton, age > 32, who died at his residence July 6, 2002. Funeral services were held today > at First Baptist Church in Waco, Texas, with a subsequent memorial = service > this afternoon at First United Methodist Church in Waxahachie, Texas. > > Jason began his church music ministry at age 12 with Sardis United Methodist > Church in Waxahachie, Texas. His other appointments after high school > graduation were with First UMC of Corsicana, Texas, and later with First UMC > of Waxahachie. > Jason attended Baylor University, majoring in journalism. After graduation, > he was employed in his chosen profession with major publications but was > equally known for his considerable keyboard skills. Jason served as organist > for First Baptist Church in Waco until his appointment as organist and Dean, > College of Communications at Christ Church Episcopal in Plano, Texas = (near > Dallas). He was co-chair for the 2003 American Guild of Organist = Regional to > be held in Waco, Texas. Often sought as a clinician in organ improvisation, > Jason was very active in the National Baylor Organ Conference and Pipe Organ > Encounters. He is survived by his parents, James and Jo Ann Ranton of > Waxahachie, Texas. Memorials may be made to the First United Methodist > Church Organ Fund, Waxahachie, Texas. > ~30~ > > ~ Jason Ranton failed to show up for a wedding Saturday afternoon at Christ > Church. > He was discovered dead in his apartment by authorities. Cause of death has > not been determined but authorities say it appears to be from natural causes > as there was no evidence of foul play. Jason was a diabetic. He was = also > the consummate musician and will be sorely missed. > > Will someone with posting privileges to Piporg-L please forward this message > to their list. > > Prayerfully, > Jim Pitts > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 19:45:32 +1200   I must agree 100%. Bigger scales and heavier, i.e. more resonant, = materials are needed when the room itself is acoustically dead. There are lots of little organ of glorious tone in little dead churches all over the place. It is also certainly true that a reverberant room can make a lousy organ sound pretty fair, and a pretty fair one sound stunning. Ross -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, July 11, 2002 1:32 PM Subject: Re: GOOD ORGANS IN LOUSY ROOMS     >Hooray for John! >Hooray for Quimby! >Hooray for Hook & Hastings > >The truth is out there all right, and it ain't rocket science, folks: >broaden the scales of your 8's, rein in your trebles, and strengthen >your 16' tone. > >There are many 19th century organs in dead rooms in the Midwest where >the ONLY 16' Pedal stop is a 16' Double Open Wood of ENORMOUS scale >(enormous by our standards, anyway). > >EVERY time I played one of those organs, I'd think to myself, "WHY, oh >WHY can't 21st century voicers make principals and flutes that SING like >that? Is voicing REALLY 50% alchemy and 50% sorcery? Couldn't these >pipes be MEASURED and the SCALES taken so that SOMEBODY could reproduce >this sound?" > >There are VERY few GOOD 19th century organs where every single stop >ISN'T a thing of beauty, right down to the Keraulophone ... EVERY stop >has a function, EVERY stop blends, EVERY combination balances. > >Hmmm ... let's see ... generous scales, relatively low wind-pressure, >slider chests, tracker action, encasement (though not always) ... guess >it really ISN'T rocket science. > >Cheers, > >Bud > >"John L. Speller" wrote: >> >> I do not adhere to the view that an organ cannot sound good in a lousy >> acoustic. It is more the case that the reverse is true -- viz., that even a >> poor instrument can sound good in a fine acoustical setting. The fact that >> most churches with lousy acoustics have organs that do not sound good = is >> more a commentary on many organbuilders' inability to scale and voice >> instruments to suit the room. Nineteenth-century organbuilders like = Hook & >> Hastings certainly knew how to make an instrument sound good in the = worst of >> acoustic environments, and we at Quimby Pipe Organs pride ourselves on >> having built quite a few organs that sound excellent in spite of the >> acoustics of the room, to some extent by studying what builders like = Hook & >> Hastings did. Indeed, it is hard to find an organ by a major >> nineteenth-century builder that doesn't sound good even in a sound absorbent >> room. The truth, as they say, is out there; the problem is that few = take >> the trouble to learn from the truth that is out there. >> >> John Speller >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >