PipeChat Digest #2960 - Thursday, July 11, 2002
 
Re: Good Organs, Bad Rooms, Clear Music
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: Good Organs, Bad Rooms, Clear Music
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Mander Organs
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: The well-preserved Colin Mitchell
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Back from Hamilton and Felix Hell.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Good Organs, Bad Rooms, Clear Music From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 13:02:34 EDT     --part1_53.1941b8af.2a5f142a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/11/02 11:59:14 AM Atlantic Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > Then again, what is ideal? Three seconds? Five and a half?   This question is much like the companion question on organs. What is the ideal size or style? The answer is the same in both situations. The ideal is in in the = eye/ear of the beholder. There should be provided acoustics and organs of = varying styles. Some are better for particular styles of music than other. = Variety is the spice of life. One of the most enjoyable recitals I've ever heard =   was played on the AEolian-Skinner organ at a church in Louisville KY by = Boyd Jones. The room is dead as a door-nail, but the organ sparkled and I = was able to enjoy the clarity of movement of every note in pieces by = Hindemith, Bach, and others. However, at the same time I'd almost crawl the distance from Florida to = hear and experience worship and organ music played in the lavish acoustical = wash of the National Cathedral. It wouldn't matter who wrote it, or possibly = even who played it... music, even noise, is beautiful and made holy in that = room. There are many rooms in between. Christ Church Cathedral - Houston, leaps = to mind. A live room with little or no reverberation and a glorious A-S GDH =   organ. THere are several very interesting acoustical anomalies, but the = room and organ are very injoyable. Another exciting and very interesting room is St. Paul's by the Sea, Jacksonville Beach FL. The building is shaped like a fish and has live acoustics and about 3 seconds reverberation, but for some strange reason = the Schantz 2m changes dramatically depending upon where a person sits; it's a =   fun room for recitals.       > However, some organbuilders are so locked into one particular way of > approaching an organ, that they build the SAME organ regardless of the > room, without thinking > laterally or inventively about what must be done. They build according = to > their set philosophy and blame the room.   In defense of "some" organ builders, there are also customers that demand = a particular style and are ignorant of their acoustics; organ builders must =   eat, too!   > < NOW: Haven't we all heard some of that 1880-1940 French repertoire =   > played in a deader-than-"perfect" room, and suddenly had voice leading = and > phrasing nuances revealed to us because they WEREN'T smeared by the vast =   > acoustic? The inner movement of voices in a Reger fugue finally seem = like > well-woven fabric rather than a tangled mess? For the first time we = realize > > that two themes are actually superimposed in the final section of a = piece, > a > cyclical feature of the work that was never apparent before?   Yup... dunnit. I really enoy learning music in a dead room so that I can =   hear every note in its proper place. But I also enjoy "working notes" in = a very live room that takes the edge off. Both acoustics have their advantages.     > This begs the question, do we NEED eight seconds? Do we need six? Just =   > as organists tend to think they need four times the instrument they = have, > shouldn't we evaluate what type of acoustic we need? At what point does > reverberance obscure, rather than support, the sound of a pipe organ? >   Again, sometimes we NEED eight seconds, sometimes TWELVE!!! Sometimes = six works, and other times one or two will do the work. The important thing = is not to try to impose a "standard/this is the only way" determination. At =   what point does reverberation obscure.... it depends upon the person listening and the person playing... again... it's relative.   << Do overly resonant rooms make pipe organs sound sluggish and boring = to > > > the "uninitiated"? Remember, the close microphone placement of a > recording, > with ambient room sound, is VERY different from how an organ is = experienced > > in real time.   I think that overly resonant rooms make the pipe organ sound magnificient and dramatic to the "unitiated." It is the "educated and critical" who = manage to find fault at every turn, blaming the room and the organ for the = failure of the organist to use the resources well.   <<How many of us have been in a highly resonant cathedral and > > been unable to make sense of Bach or anything ELSE because it became a > jumbled mass of reverberation and echo?   I have never had this experience personally, nor have I had the experience =   when listening to a performed to worked the organ and the room properly. = To wit: Douglas Major and Wayne Dirksen. And I have two favorite = listening points in the Cathedral: the Great Quire and the back row of the nave. = BOTH place give exquisite results. It just depends upon what I want to enjoy = the most and for what purpose I'm listening!       Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_53.1941b8af.2a5f142a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 7/11/02 11:59:14 AM Atlantic = Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> Then again, what = is ideal?&nbsp; Three seconds? Five and a half? </FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">This question is = much like the companion question on organs.&nbsp; What is the ideal size = or style?<BR> The answer is the same in both situations.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The ideal is = in in the eye/ear of the beholder.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There should be = provided acoustics and organs of varying styles.&nbsp;&nbsp; Some are = better for particular styles of music than other.&nbsp; Variety is the = spice of life.&nbsp;&nbsp; One of the most enjoyable recitals I've ever = heard was played on the AEolian-Skinner organ at a church in Louisville KY = by Boyd Jones.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The room is dead as a door-nail, but the = organ sparkled and I was able to enjoy the clarity of movement of every = note in pieces by Hindemith, Bach, and others.<BR> However, at the same time I'd almost crawl the distance from Florida to = hear and experience worship and organ music played in the lavish = acoustical wash of the National Cathedral.&nbsp; It wouldn't matter who = wrote it, or possibly even who played it... music, even noise, is = beautiful and made holy in that room.<BR> There are many rooms in between.&nbsp; Christ Church Cathedral - Houston, = leaps to mind.&nbsp;&nbsp; A live room with little or no reverberation and = a glorious A-S GDH organ.&nbsp; THere are several very interesting = acoustical anomalies, but the room and organ are very injoyable.<BR> Another exciting and very interesting room is St. Paul's by the Sea, = Jacksonville Beach FL.&nbsp;&nbsp; The building is shaped like a fish and = has live acoustics and about 3 seconds reverberation, but for some strange = reason the Schantz 2m changes dramatically depending upon where a person = sits; it's a fun room for recitals.<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">However, some = organbuilders are so locked into one particular way of approaching an = organ, that they build the SAME organ regardless of the room, without = thinking <BR> laterally or inventively about what must be done. They build according to = <BR> their set philosophy and blame the room.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In defense of = "some" organ builders, there are also customers that demand a particular = style and are ignorant of their acoustics;&nbsp; organ builders must eat, = too!</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px">&lt;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; NOW:&nbsp; Haven't we all heard some of that = 1880-1940 French repertoire <BR> played in a deader-than-"perfect" room, and suddenly had voice leading and = <BR> phrasing nuances revealed to us because they WEREN'T smeared by the vast = <BR> acoustic? The inner movement of voices in a Reger fugue finally seem like = <BR> well-woven fabric rather than a tangled mess? For the first time we = realize <BR> that two themes are actually superimposed in the final section of a piece, = a <BR> cyclical feature of the work that was never apparent before?</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 = FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Yup... = dunnit.&nbsp;&nbsp; I really enoy learning music in a dead room so that I = can hear every note in its proper place.&nbsp;&nbsp; But I also enjoy = "working notes" in a very live room that takes the edge off.&nbsp;&nbsp; = Both acoustics have their advantages.<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> This begs the = question, do we NEED eight seconds?&nbsp; Do we need six? Just <BR> as organists tend to think they need four times the instrument they have, = <BR> shouldn't we evaluate what type of acoustic we need? At what point does = <BR> reverberance obscure, rather than support, the sound of a pipe organ?<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Again, sometimes = we NEED eight seconds, sometimes TWELVE!!!&nbsp;&nbsp; Sometimes six = works, and other times one or two will do the work.&nbsp;&nbsp; The = important thing is not to try to impose a "standard/this is the only way" = determination.&nbsp;&nbsp; At what point does reverberation obscure.... it = depends upon the person listening and the person playing... again... it's = relative.<BR> <BR> &lt;&lt;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Do overly resonant rooms make pipe organs sound = sluggish and boring to <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: = #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: = 5px"><BR> the "uninitiated"?&nbsp; Remember, the close microphone placement of a = recording, <BR> with ambient room sound, is VERY different from how an organ is = experienced <BR> in real time. </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I think that = overly resonant rooms make the pipe organ sound magnificient and dramatic = to the "unitiated."&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is the "educated and critical" = who manage to find fault at every turn, blaming the room and the organ for = the failure of the organist to use the resources well.<BR> <BR> &lt;&lt;How many of us have been in a highly resonant cathedral and <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> been unable to make sense of Bach or anything ELSE because it became a = <BR> jumbled mass of reverberation and echo?</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I have never had = this experience personally, nor have I had the experience when listening = to a performed to worked the organ and the room properly.&nbsp; To = wit:&nbsp; Douglas Major and Wayne Dirksen.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; And I have = two favorite listening points in the Cathedral:&nbsp; the Great Quire and = the back row of the nave.&nbsp; BOTH place give exquisite results.&nbsp; = It just depends upon what I want to enjoy the most and for what purpose = I'm listening!<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_53.1941b8af.2a5f142a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 13:10:04 -0400   If there is a difference between what is generically labelled "Mixture" = and Harmonics, can someone explain what that difference is? I'm aware of all the named compounds and what they are, e.g., scharff, cymbel, bla, bla. What I'm not clear on is that the words mixture and harmonics, which are both, to me anyway, generic terms describing a = compound make up of the respective stop so is there a difference between them?   Robert B. Colasacco Administrative Assistant/Secretary Distinguished Colleagues Population Council One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza New York, NY 10017 Direct Telephone: (212) 339-0685 Main Telephone: (212) 339-0500 Fax: (212) 755-6052 e-mail: rcolasacco@popcouncil.org Visit our web site: www.popcouncil.org    
(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 13:16:36 -0400   --- What I'm not clear on is that the words mixture and harmonics, which are both, to me anyway, generic terms describing a = compound make up of the respective stop so is there a difference between them?   =3D=3D=3D I'm not sure. You'll have to ask someone else. Sorry I can't help you.    
(back) Subject: Re: Good Organs, Bad Rooms, Clear Music From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 17:53:59 +0000   Dear list Having sat through countless recitals in a vast variety of rooms and on a vast range of organs (though not in the USofA)- and given quite a few = myself on a similarly varied collection of instruments and rooms (J W Walker, Mander, Grant Degens and Bradbeer and Copemann Hart are amongst the = builders who have asked me to give recitals on their instruments) I hope I am at least partly qualified to speak on this issue! A good organ played by a = good organist - and it needs to be an organist who understands legato playing, phrasing and have an ability to communicate - will sound good whatever the =   room, if he/she is on form, provided the organ is not totally misplaced, = for example hidden away in a virtual cupboard, as can be the case. You do not need 4+ seconds echo to give the organ a rich sound - though a little "bloom" is eminently desirable - 1 second or even less will do. Yes. Wall = to Ceiling carpeting is not a good idea - this will kill the sound - though = in Europe this is rare. Incidentally on the pipe digital issue the same = applies - a good musician can make both pipe and digital sound good or bad as he wishes. I have heard "pipe v Electronic" contests which were quite = obviously rigged in favour of the pipe organ - the organist went out of his way to make the toast sound burnt! Organists like this should be ashamed of themselves! Yes - choose a programme to suit the instrument and the room, but counterpoint comes through on a good instrument when well played, and the sound can be a delight to the ear even in a fairly dry room if the instrument is well voiced and intelligently designed. John Foss     _________________________________________________________________ Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 19:40:46 +0000     Dear Bob It's not that difficult - have a look at that witty American Bill Bryson's =   book on our "mother tongue". A mixture is what it says - two or more ranks =   of pipes of diferent pitch mixed together - the purpose being to add a bit =   of brilliance to a chorus. The word Harmonics comes from the fact that any =   note is compounded of a fundamental - e.g. C, and harmonics - the octave, = c fifth,g third,e etc. The only implication behind the use in organ nomenclature is, generally speaking, that the harmonics include the = tierce, which is a predominant harmonic of the reed stops, and so is often = designed to blend the flues to the reeds. John Foss     _________________________________________________________________ Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 15:47:19 -0400   The only implication behind the use in organ nomenclature is, generally speaking, that the harmonics include the = tierce, which is a predominant harmonic of the reed stops, and so is often = designed to blend the flues to the reeds. John Foss     _________________________________________________________________ Join the world's largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com   Thank you, John. That's the distinction I guess I needed. I'm well aware = of what mixtures are but I just wasn't sure if harmonics actually were something completely different, or if some designer/builder just wanted to distinguish himself by using a different term for the same stops. I also think it's safe here to say "himself" and not be PC only because I'm not aware of any female organ builders or tonal designers, for that matter. = But then as sometimes before, I could be wrong. Robert Bernardino Colasacco  
(back) Subject: Mander Organs From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 21:27:11 +0100   Hello,   OK....I know Malcolm Wechsler has a vested interest, but he is = absolutely right about mid-19th century organs in poor acoustics....they = sound right. Mander Organs consciously adopted the style of William Hill (with = improvements) and it has proved a considerable success.=20   The Hill/Gauntlett revolution was of profound importance in the = development of the "Anglicised" romantic organ; hence my appreciation of = the Cambridge Methodist Church (Wesley Chapel) and the ex-Bradford organ = in that building built by Hill.   Malcolm will also understand my pride in having played the equally = fascinating instrument in Gt.George Street Congregational Church, = Liverpool....a very important Hill/Gauntlett organ which, sadly, did not = survive.   However, the Hill style owed much to Snetzler and he, like many others, = continued that tradition....even to the extent of utilising tierce = Mixtures.   Other less well known builders include Isaac Abbot (who "possibly" = worked for Hill.....can anyone verify this?), the founder of the company = which became Abbot & Smith. Their work was tonally magnificent, and some = of the best small to medium size Anglican instruments I have accompanied = on bear their name.   Issac Abbot built a remarkable organ for Queensbury Parish Church....the = gift of John Foster the mill owner in Bradford, West Yorkshire in the = UK. John Foster was very musical apprently, and his name is still = honoured by the Brass Band known as "Black Dyke".....one of the finest = brass groups in the world which prompted Andre Previn to say, "I wish I = had brass players like that in the LSO"   This organ sounds so absolutely right in the rather dead building and is = worthy of study by anone who would install an instrument in a similar = acoustic.....and object lesson in good taste, scaling and voicing.   But I still stick to what I said about very ABSORBENT = structures......medium scaling and low wind pressures are soon killed in = flight. The only answer was IMHO....dare I say it (?).........Wurlitzer, = Compton, Aeolian Skinner etc etc   I CAN understand the reversal of Baroque fortunes because, again IMHO, = it is an unmitigated disaster attempting to import a continental sound = into churches which resemble cinemas acoustically.   So, organ builders of the world....brush up your voicing techniques, = polish the nicking tools and get to work.   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK            
(back) Subject: RE: The well-preserved Colin Mitchell From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 21:40:36 +0100   He He!!   Nice one Robert!   Marchal OF COURSE......blind as a bat, or was that Dupre.....no, he was = tall and skinny......erm....Langlais.....wasn't he blind? Long Head like = a Melon and could improvise competently.   You may have gathered, I am not into the French thing very much!!!   :)   Colin Mitchell UK       -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of = "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Sent: 11 July 2002 15:04 To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: The well-preserved Colin Mitchell   Wow ... Colin heard Marchand (1669-1732) play! Please give us the lowdown on French Baroque performance practice--tempi, agrements, the whole 9 yards. If you can remember :-)   Bob Lind (who heard Marchal play on the Schlicker at Valparaiso University just about that long ago, give or take a couple of centuries or so)=20         cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk 07/10/2002 03:55 PM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> =09 To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>@SMTP@cchntmsd cc:=09 Subject: RE: Good organs in lousy rooms=09       It is actually a very, very fine instrument for the building and, it was on this organ during my formative years, = that I would travel home on a proverbial cloud after hearing the likes of = Germani, Dupre, Marchand and Flor Peeters.....performances which etched into my memory.=20               "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 16:46:21 EDT   Actually, the use of the word "Harmonics" as a stop NAME implies a flat twenty-first in the mix, not merely the seventeenth. This is a VERY = specific animal.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Back from Hamilton and Felix Hell. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 17:50:29 -0400   Three of us managed to find our way to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, to hear =   Felix Hell playing four different organs in the city. Felix had many things to contend with, the heat, the schedule, the organs, and not least his "Groupies"!   I am very grateful to Doug Campbell who picked me up in Kingston, and = drove my car with me as a very contented passenger to Hamilton and then = proceeded to chauffeur both Mike Gettelman and myself around the City of Hamilton.   Hamilton, by the way, was laid out by the devil himself, for all the streets seem to be one way streets, - always going the other way than the way we wanted to go! Also the four churches that Felix was playing in = were not the easiest to find, even though the organizers had provided us with a =   map! Perhaps it was fitting that Felix Hell should be giving his first Canadian concerts in the devilish town of Hamilton!   However, every-one really enjoyed all of the Concerts, wherein Felix tried =   to show the particular advantages of each of the organs in each of the venues.   The first evening concert at the Church of the Ascension was decidedly a trial by fire for all of us, - I would estimate that the temperature = within the church was well above 90 degreed Fahrenheit. and with perhaps some 400 =   or so in the audience it became a bit of an oven! However,I imagine that =   Felix Hell was in his element! It was hellishly warm! The playing was as =   hot as the surrounding ambience, - this young man will be one of the great =   organists of the 21st century.   On Wednesday there was an organ crawl over three organs in three different =   churches. Felix showed off each organ with pieces that really suited each =   individual organ, whilst the Grand Finale was in Christ Church Cathedral where he played a Guilmant Organ Symphony for organ and orchestra, very ably aided and abetted by the National Academy Orchestra, a really fine group of young musicians directed by Boris Brott.   This work was supposed to be the culmination of the festivities, but young =   Mr. Hell gave us an encore by playing the Widor Toccata in a really grand manner!   All in all, a really fine couple of days, and if you get the chance to = hear this young man performing you will be as amazed as I have been with his prowess.   I would like to thank both Doug Campbell and Mike Gettelman for their delightful company, both at the concerts, and when we were attempting to attempting to find the locations of them! More so, perhaps, for their company whilst we were carousing at the Gown and Gavel in Hess Village, cooling down after the oven that was the Church of the Ascension for the very first concert!   Thanks Guys!   Bob Conway