PipeChat Digest #2962 - Saturday, July 13, 2002
 
RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Pedals, Pipes and Pizza
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net>
RE: Pedals, Pipes and Pizza
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Pipe Organ Actions (Cross Post)
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Re: Christ Church, Oxon, Rieger
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question
  by <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com>
Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Fur clad rooms
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: Pedals, Pipes and Pizza
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
IRC
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Whitelegg's Harmonics
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Christ Church, Oxon, Rieger
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 08:50:02 -0400   That's why I was enquiring, to find out if it were something specific. = Thank you.   -----Original Message----- From: TubaMagna@aol.com [mailto:TubaMagna@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, July 11, 2002 4:46 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics     Actually, the use of the word "Harmonics" as a stop NAME implies a flat twenty-first in the mix, not merely the seventeenth. This is a VERY specific animal.   SMG   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 08:59:26 -0400   Vielen dank.   -----Original Message----- From: John L. Speller [mailto:jlspeller@mindspring.com] Sent: Thursday, July 11, 2002 8:45 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics     "Mixture" is a generic name for any compound stop with more than one rank  
(back) Subject: Pedals, Pipes and Pizza From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 10:26:41 -0400   Our theatre organ society is considering having a Pedal, Pipes, and Pizza affair on a Sunday afternoon.   Have any of you been involved in such an event?   I am looking for answers to such questions as:   How did you keep the pizzas warm? When were the pizzas served? All during the event? only for an hour in the middle? Did you do the pizzas yourself or have them delivered in? Were they delivered in- in shifts, to keep them hot? Did you rent the "hot sun lamps" for keeping the pizzas warm? Did you rent pizza ovens? How did you estimate how many pizzas were needed? Is this type of event only for a small group of people? How about pizza for 100 or more people?   Thanks in advance for any info.   Paul R. Swank Newsletter Editor Free State Theatre Organ Society Baltimore, MD.   prswank@surfbest.net    
(back) Subject: RE: Pedals, Pipes and Pizza From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 10:31:11 -0400   How did you keep the pizzas warm?       I am a pizza expert, okay. Now, you don't EVER reheat pizza. You either = have it timed so that the pizza is delivered when you are ready to eat it = piping hot OR you eat it cold. That's right you eat it cold. I'm sure there are other tastes out there but reheated pizza is a sign of bad taste as is improperly reheated leftover spaghetti, which is properly reheated fried = to a crisp. Microwave ovens were designed only for reheating a cup of coffee.   So 2 rules only...   1. Pizza prepared when you are ready for it fresh and hot, or 2. Eat it cold (that means room temperature) END. Robert        
(back) Subject: Pipe Organ Actions (Cross Post) From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 09:43:29 -0500   I picked up a free windchest the other day from Charles Hendrickson. It came from a church in Iowa where he is installing a new organ. I also have a LOVELY 61-note 8' wooden flute to go with it. Anyhow, its a 61-note chest, and I'm not sure of the action. I've only had exposure to direct-electric action in the past, which I built a 73 note chest with. This chest has some saucer-type things "over" the pallets, with an arched metal piece coming out, to which the + and - wires are connected. What type of action is this? I know this must sound really weird for all of you organ experts, but I have to start somewhere. :-) BTW, using the "9 volt battery method" I was able to get some "noise" out of the "magnets" (or whatever they are), but nothing opened. It gives the same noise regardless of where + and - from the battery are placed.   Thanks! Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: Christ Church, Oxon, Rieger From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:10:22 -0400     On Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:05:14 +1200 "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> writes: > Just as a matter of interest, I'll ask why any Presbyterian Church > in > Scotland would want to have an organ quintessentially English, > implying > Anglican? > Ross     Possibly because 45 ranks of bagpipe reeds tend to be a bit of "overkill" ??????     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question From: <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:12:50 EDT     --part1_69.29ed8306.2a607622_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/12/02 12:10:54 AM Eastern Daylight Time, bob@peak.org =   writes:     > Hi again - > > Work continues on our touring desert classical organ. :-) > > We are constructing a new front panel for the console which will hold = both > the stop tabs and the Alhborn Archive modules which will provide the = tone > generation. > > There are more stops available than will fit in one row of stop tabs. = The > size and configuration of the console prohibits using drawknobs to the > sides or tilting tablets, and we have plenty of spare tab actions and = cost > is a factor. > > So, we need to arrange the stop tabs in two straight horizontal rows. > (Not horseshoe like a theatre console). I've seen a few photos of > classical consoles with two rows of stop tabs, but wonder how they are > arranged. > > The best fit for us seems to be pedal, then swell on the top row, and > great as one large bottom row. Is there a "standard" configuration? I > have a copy of the AGO console specifications and it is mainly concerned > with the shape of the pedalboard, distance of keys to pedals, etc, = wihtout > mentioning stop layout suggestions. > > Any advice would be appreciated. > > Thanks! > > Bob Richardson   The standard layout would be Swell on the top row, Pedal on the lower = left, and Great on the lower right.   Jeremy   --part1_69.29ed8306.2a607622_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 7/12/02 12:10:54 AM Eastern = Daylight Time, bob@peak.org writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Hi again -<BR> <BR> Work continues on our touring desert classical organ. :-)<BR> <BR> We are constructing a new front panel for the console which will hold = both<BR> the stop tabs and the Alhborn Archive modules which will provide the = tone<BR> generation.<BR> <BR> There are more stops available than will fit in one row of stop = tabs.&nbsp; The<BR> size and configuration of the console prohibits using drawknobs to the<BR> sides or tilting tablets, and we have plenty of spare tab actions and = cost<BR> is a factor.<BR> <BR> So, we need to arrange the stop tabs in two straight horizontal rows.<BR> (Not horseshoe like a theatre console). I've seen a few photos of<BR> classical consoles with two rows of stop tabs, but wonder how they are<BR> arranged.<BR> <BR> The best fit for us seems to be pedal, then swell on the top row, and<BR> great as one large bottom row.&nbsp; Is there a "standard" = configuration?&nbsp; I<BR> have a copy of the AGO console specifications and it is mainly = concerned<BR> with the shape of the pedalboard, distance of keys to pedals, etc, = wihtout<BR> mentioning stop layout suggestions.<BR> <BR> Any advice would be appreciated.<BR> <BR> Thanks!<BR> <BR> Bob Richardson</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> The standard layout would be Swell on the top row, Pedal on the lower = left, and Great on the lower right.<BR> <BR> Jeremy</FONT></HTML>   --part1_69.29ed8306.2a607622_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:22:22 -0700   I think it doesn't much matter, as long as the Pedal is to the left. Putting the Pedal on the bottom row is probably more CONVENIENT.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Mixtures vs. Harmonics From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:06:02 -0400   on 7/11/02 8:44 PM, John L. Speller at jlspeller@mindspring.com wrote:   > "Mixture" is a generic name for any compound stop with more than one = rank > for each note on the keyboard. "Harmonics" refers to a particular kind = of > mixture that was popular in the first third of the twentieth century. = It > generally comprised four ranks -- seventeenth 1.3/5', nineteenth 1.1/3', > flat twenty-first 1.1/7' and twenty-second 1'. Occasionally a fifteenth = 2' > was added to make it five ranks. The pipes were normally scaled and = voiced > as Dulcianas, and the mixture was usually carried pretty much up to the = top > of the keyboard without any breaks. It was designed to supply = additional > harmonics to the chorus, as the name suggests. The flat twenty-first > (septieme), however, stands out and gives the chorus something of an > unpleasant acidic, reedy edge. It has accordingly often been stopped = off in > surviving Harmonics mixtures. The stop was used by Arthur Harrison and > Henry Willis III in England and in late Ernest M. Skinner and early G. > Donald Harrison organs in the U.S. > > John Speller   I am glad to be enlightened on this, as I seem to have something akin to = it on my organ, a 1934 Moller that because of its date is likely to be a Whitelegg creation and puts it on the cusp of "the first third of the twentieth century" of which you write. On the choir it has Dulciana 16', 8', 4', 2 2/3', and 2'. I'm missing the seventeenth and the flat twenty-first, but with the Choir to Choir 4' coupler I have the nineteenth and twenty-second. The 8' Dulciana by itself is extremely soft, almost inaudible. How might I best use these harmonics? To "supply additional harmonics to the chorus", as you say? Is there any literature for which = it is especially appropriate?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: Fur clad rooms From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 21:19:02 +0100   Hello,   You must understand that I come from a country where anything over 10"wg = flue pressure is virtually unknown....thankfully!   I also live a country which has an awesome Schulze organ working on very = modest wind-pressures but with huge scales.....five chorus stops = ricochet from every corner of the building with devastating power. A = replication of the Schulze sound, by Senator Emerson Richartds, was = described as "shattering".   However, I would be the first to recognise that the latter could never, = ever, in a million years, sound good in a totally dead and absorbent = building....this is a peculiarly American problem.   I mentioned the organ of Cambridge Wesley Church for a special reason. = This is not a loud organ. In its original home at Eastbrook Methodist = Hall, Bradford in the UK, the seating capacity in an octagonal building = was something in the order of 3,000 or so. Hill actually underscaled = quite regularly, as he did at York Minster, which had a VAST = specification on the Great Organ which included no less than TEN four = foot Principals!!!!! This was the problem at Bradford.   When that instrument was moved to a quite small building, at Cambridge, = the effect was immediately quite wonderful and more than adequate.   My quote about the 7"wg pressure came from the kips of Frank Fowler, the = former MD of Hill. Norman & Beard Ltd., and an ex-Christie man himself = who knew the head voicer Lamb. I am not sure of the history, but I = "think" Lamb was associated with Norman & Beard as voicer during the = time that Hope Jones started his experiments on Tibia Clausae for his = Orchestral Organs which eventually became Wurlitzer.   The full quote went, "It doesn't matter what the pipe foot pressure is = at the soundboard. Closing the foot and regulating the flueway usually = means that the lip pressure is about 6 - 7""   Now, I would be delighted to be contradicted and corrected.....life is = one long learning curve, though to what purpose or use such excessive = knowledge may result is, I suspect, purely academic!!   Over to the experts across the pond! Do we have any physicists aboard?   I would just pout a small correction of intent to my previous post re: = digitals sounding better in highly absorbent rooms. I MEANT to say that, = apart from the effect of organ pipe sampling, it is a simple matter to = also sample the sound of the pipes within a specific acoustic.......I = think that this makes more sense. In other words, it is a replication of = both organ pipes AND the "sound" of a building. Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK               -----Original Message----- From: "pipechat@pipechat.org" <pipechat@pipechat.org> on behalf of "John = L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Sent: 12 July 2002 01:16 To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Fur clad rooms   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >If a room is covered in carpet, soft toys, cushions, >acoustic tiles = and the clergy wear mohair cassocks, the >amount of energy absorbed is = enormous.   >Malcolm Wechsler rightly referred to 19th century organ >building, but = in a room which resembles an anachoic >chamber, the chances of this suceeding = are quite small. >Light to medium pressure would result in a power level = >which wouldn't overcome the absorbency of the >building.   This rather depends on the size of the room. The church with the worst acoustics I have ever come across in my entire life -- being in it is disconcerting to the point of being surrealistic -- is nevertheless = quite small. It has a well- designed pipe organ built about fifteen years ago that sounds remarkably well. The instrument speaks on 3.1/2" wind, and carries throughout the building very well -- but it is nevertheless = quite a small building, so it doesn't have far to carry.   In a larger room, as you suggest, you would need to use higher wind pressures. In most cases six or seven inches would suffice, but = suggesting that 7" would be the maximum for flues is, however, something of an oversimplification, and under certain circumstances one might voice the diapasons on a pressure as high as ten or twelve inches. A lot depends = on the mouth width. It is generally assumed that the wider the mouth the louder the pipe, and this in a sense is true. What this overlooks, = however, is the fact that a narrower mouth can be forced a lot further without = the pipe speech becoming unstable. This also means that lower cut-ups are necessary with narrower mouths, and by forcing the pipe to the max you = do not lose so much of the harmonic development.   This is something that Ernest M. Skinner well understood, which is why = his No. 1 Open Diapasons are frequently voiced to the max with 2/9 or even = 1/5 mouths, while the No. 2 and No. 3, which does not need to be so loud, = often have a 1/4 mouth. Or perhaps in some instances there might be a 2/9 = mouth only in the lowest octave or so, where the power is most needed, and = then changing to 1/4 in the treble.   And then there are double-languid diapasons, sometimes used on pressures = of 20" or more. I'm afraid I don't know much about these, but Skinner, who seems to have known what he was doing, took a dim view of them.   John Speller             "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Pedals, Pipes and Pizza From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:45:51 -0400   Well, actually Robert is right.   They'll eat free pizza at any temperature. It's good hot, but it also disappears as it cools off.   However you need to take a few more things into account.   Room temp. Is it 90? Got A/C? When it's real warm and humid, and especially with lots of people around, food is apt to spoil on you a whole lot faster, although plain Pizza is a pretty safe choice, one of the best.   Get a couple big sheet pizzas to start, order another one to be delivered in about half an hour, then keep an eye on the table and see how it's going. They'll probably deliver in about 20 min. or so, won't they? Get one plain and one pepperoni, at least.   It depends a lot on how many people come, and when. Make your best guess to start, and find a pizza place that delivers on Sunday afternoon without taking too long.   You will also need napkins, those small paper plates work really well, and a place to wash hands. Probably are rest rooms there anyway.   And you'll need something to drink. Couple of coffeemakers, one regular, one decaf------cups. 2 lb. can of each kind (they say Folgers holds the best, without getting bitter). Sugar, sugar substitute, creamer, stir sticks. Where can you fill the pot for the coffeemaker? Bathroom? Drinking fountain?   Lemonade goes real well also---and water. If you can get a 3rd coffee machine, make plain hot water and provide teabags.   Anybody feels ambitious, chips and other junk food always goes well, and so do cookies, homemade or bought, either one. Also those little after dinner mints, the little pillow shaped candy ones ------settles the pizza you ate too much of.   The Rochester Theatre Organ Society has Open Console every month, from 9 to 4, and this is exactly what they do. I don't know who owns the coffeemakers, one lady mostly takes care of the stuff, using tote bags, but other people always help. Somebody shows up with the pizza sometime around noon or 1, before we get there, and it just sits on the table. People don't eat as much of it as you think they might.   Which reminds me, you also need a table, a plastic tablecloth, a wastebasket, and check the outlets to see if you can plug in those coffee makers. Might need a heavy duty extension cord. We just use the 10 cup Mr. Coffee thingies and foam cups, nothing really fancy.   The first time is the hardest. Write it down!! After that you'll have something to go on.   And check what else is going on that day, too. If there's a big parade or festival or something, you'll only get a few diehards.   Good luck, It will be fine! Diane S.          
(back) Subject: Re: Stop Tab Arrangement Question From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:44:30 EDT   Dear Bob:   When we set up our Ahlborn Modules, we had "just" enough room to place the boxes to the left and right of the pipe organ stop tabs. We made an exact cut out on the stop rail to accomodate both. We did fudge the stop tabs a bit closer together in the middle to do this. There were 27 tabs and they all fit. Our console combination action afforded us 15 generals out of 16 pistons. We just respliced the diodes to give 15 generals. This alleviates the necessity for a kit to transfer the stops to tabs.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: IRC From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 18:11:26 -0700   Chat is now ... 9 p.m. East Coast time. See you there!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Whitelegg's Harmonics From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 22:24:15 EDT   Richard Oliver Whitelegg, briefly with Moller, DID include a Harmonics =   with flat 21st on at least one of his instruments, the large four-manual = at Church of the Holy Name of Jesus in Manhattan, now unplayable. The Great sported a Mixture (quints and unisons), a Cornet (with seventeenth), and Harmonics (with flat twenty-first). These latter two = were off sufficient reediness as to have no chorus Trumpet on the Great, = although there was a full Trumpet chorus on the Swell and Trumpets in the Solo and Pedal. Also of interest in this remarkably Willis-inspired 1938 masterpiece = are the two spotted metal Pedal mixtures, one a Gross Sesquialtera (5-1/3' + 3-1/5').   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Christ Church, Oxon, Rieger From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 13 Jul 2002 20:39:39 +1200   Am I meant to reply? Here goes: I've been in massed bands with 200 pipers present - that equals 600 drone reeds and 200 chanter reeds. Bliss............ Ross -----Original Message----- From: Douglas A. Campbell <dougcampbell@juno.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, July 13, 2002 4:00 AM Subject: Re: Christ Church, Oxon, Rieger     > >On Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:05:14 +1200 "Ross & Lynda Wards" ><TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> writes: >> Just as a matter of interest, I'll ask why any Presbyterian Church >> in >> Scotland would want to have an organ quintessentially English, >> implying >> Anglican? >> Ross > > >Possibly because 45 ranks of bagpipe reeds tend to be a bit of "overkill" >?????? > > >Douglas A. Campbell >Skaneateles, NY > >________________________________________________________________ >GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! >Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! >Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: >http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >