PipeChat Digest #2965 - Sunday, July 14, 2002
 
wedding marches -- WHO CARES?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Krumhorn
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Krumhorn
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Thanks Felix (cross posted)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
RE: Krumhorn
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
double-tongued tuba
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Well, yes, who DOES care?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Bagpipes and organs
  by "alan spence" <alan.spence@xtra.co.nz>
Re: A loverly wedding
  by <MFoxy9795@aol.com>
Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: loverly wedding
  by "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: Thanks Felix (cross posted)
  by <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com>
Re: Krumhorn
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: Traditional wedding marches
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: wedding marches -- WHO CARES? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 13:04:27 -0700   I think if you look in the archives, we've been there / done this at LEAST twice.   I've played 'em / not played 'em for forty plus years, depending on the priest and the parish.   I could care less, other than I DID bother to learn a rather good transcription of the COMPLETE Mendelssohn so that I could play it as both the recessional march AND the postlude for the congregation.   One place I played had a rather decent bongatron that played from the organ console ... I used to play the Mendelssohn on the organ till the bride got to the back door, and then switch to the tower bells ... melody on the Flemish bells, accompaniment on the harp bells. Tacky, but effective (grin).   Alan's suggestion about singing a hymn going in or going out simply wouldn't fly in these parts ... for one thing, nobody will put down their little flash cameras to pick up a hymnal or a service-booklet (grin); for another, it's like nobody ever saw a gal in a white dress before ... they all gotta "oooh" and "ahhhh" through the whole processional.   And I'm talkin' about a HIGH Anglican church here, folks. The Good Lord only KNOWS what goes on ELSEWHERE.   Oh well, that's California.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 16:19:44 EDT   Dear Ross:   The modern bagpipe in the UK and Ireland, evolved from Roman use, BC into AD. The origin of bagpipes goes back much farther to a conquered country, that the Romans fought with. It might be interesting to trace it back to the inventors of the instrument.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: Krumhorn From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 16:44:33 -0400       Tim wrote: [snipped a bit]   > Real (mouth blown) oboe reeds are different, I believe, in that there = are > essentially *two* reeds beating against each other (someone please = correct > me if I'm wrong!) and I'd imagine the Krumhorn you saw being constructed > would have that sort of reed arrangement. (I'd bet it would be a good = deal > of a challenge to get that sort of reed to work in an organ pipe...!) > > Cheers, all -- > > Tim   Hi Tim, Thanks for you very informative reply. It is interesting to note that Roy actually made the reed, which was held together by a couple of brass ring bands. The upper one was adjustable, and by sliding it up or down, the = reeds were made to speak clearly. He had great trouble arriving at the correct adjustment indeed. Mike      
(back) Subject: Re: Krumhorn From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 16:49:31 -0400   Hi Andrew, Thanks for your instruction. It's interesting you mentioned the Cor' = Anglais because I know that Rich Schneider has recently installed such a rank on = the organ at First Mennonite in Berne Indiana. I wonder if he could tell us if = it's a free reed?. Mike   Andrew Mead wrote:   > The free reed stops I've seen on Casavants (almost always Cor' Anglais) = have > an arrangement where the reed is fixed to a shallot and instead of the = reed > contacting the shallot face it passes through the opening and then = returns > without striking the shallot. > There is an Aeoline/Casavant hybrid in Toronto with a Clarinet = presumably > built by Aeolian. It consists of a resonator with boot but no block. = Inside > the boot is a regular dime-a-dozen melodeon reed soldered onto a tilted > plate-- upside down of course. > The tuning is accomplished by adjusting the height of the resonator cap. = I > have no explanation for why the plate is tilted. > The sound is quite good to my ears and I wonder why I've seen only one > example of it. It's very reliable and stays in tune longer than the > fricative reeds in the organ. > The only reason I've had to open one was to account for the fact that = the > clarinet rank I was trying to tune had no tuning wires!! > > AjM >    
(back) Subject: Thanks Felix (cross posted) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 17:03:45 -0400   Having just returned from a splendid 2 day organ adventure in Hamilton Ontario, which featured Felix performing on 4 vintage Casavants in 2 days, I was moved to express my appreciation to Felix with a thank you note. As it happens, that note has seen some further circulation, and it has been suggested that I share it with you all. Despite all the hype on the lists, I was truly unprepared for the striking impression this young man gives you, both musically, and as a human being. The hype was simply inadequate.   Mike     Hi Felix, To put you on right away to which one I was, you graciously signed my stopped flute pipe Wednesday night, and I will treasure it forever. Thanks very much. In my short experience as an organ enthusiast, I have been lucky enough to hear some world class performers (Gillian Weir, Thomas Murray, Simon Preston,   and yes, John Weaver, perform on a world class instrument (Severance Hall), but I cannot remember feeling any where near the excitement as with you creating a magical musical experience on 4 rather elderly Casavants. You have already attained greatness,   and my imagination is staggered at the potential for your future. I shall make every effort to hear you again in Buffalo, and the next week in Columbus this coming November. I just wanted you to know your hard work is bringing great happiness to organ lovers like me, and offer my best wishes for your future. Thank you so much   for being who you are, and bringing your wonderful Father along for the ride. Meeting him was nearly as great a treat as hearing you (well, maybe not quite, but right up there anyway :-)   Yours Forever Mike Gettelman        
(back) Subject: RE: Krumhorn From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 17:23:52 -0400             A "free-reed" organ pipe works exactly as Andrew describes it -- the reed vibrates back and forth thru an opening, without physically contacting its frame (not really a "shallot"), aside from its point of attachment at one end, of course). Pump organ and harmonium reeds operate in the same way.   The location of the reed within the pipe itself and the method of tuning depends on its maker and usage, and varies accordingly. As Andrew         I don't wish to nit-pick but for the record Casavant free reed = arrangements did have shallots in form, but not in normal function. I spelt Aeoleon wrong didn't I? (aeoline) AjM              
(back) Subject: double-tongued tuba From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 17:33:30 -0400   Now that I'm thinking a lot about reeds, has anyone ever seen a double tongued Tuba stop? I'd heard rumours of its' existence in an ancient Casavant (1905) in an abandoned church in Toronto. About 10 years ago I had a chance to look at the 4m organ with its' original terraced console and sure enough the solo Tuba 8' had a two faced shallot with separate tongues. I cannot remember = the arrangement for the tuning wires although I think they were connected into one wire from the tuning end. The organ was shut down and I never heard the stop. Seven years ago the church evaporated in a fire. AjM      
(back) Subject: Well, yes, who DOES care? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 17:36:28 -0400   On 7/14/02 4:04 PM, "quilisma@socal.rr.com" <quilisma@socal.rr.com> wrote:   > I think if you look in the archives, we've been there / done this at > LEAST twice.   Unquestionably. Square-- no, CUBE--that number. > [snip]   > One place I played had a rather decent bongatron that played from the > organ console ... I used to play the Mendelssohn on the organ till the > bride got to the back door, and then switch to the tower bells ... > melody on the Flemish bells, accompaniment on the harp bells. Tacky, but > effective (grin).   Agreed on both adjectives. There's a time and place for everything. Even that. Kudos for doing it. Imagination has its place. > > Alan's suggestion about singing a hymn going in or going out simply > wouldn't fly in these parts ...   I have no doubt. But there still ARE a FEW weddings (we're about to have one--a brilliant young German nobleman [accountant, ushers once a month] = and his [sedate and LOVELY] ballet dancer bride from Brazil) where, while the whole world is welcome, so long as they fit, the congregation will be = devout folks with no winkylights, and if there are oohs and aahs, they will be SILENT. The folks on THEIR invitation list will join wonderfully in the processional hymn. Oh, there'll be elaborate interludes between (among?) stanzas, so people can enjoy LOOKING at the processional as well (and = that's OK); but they'll SING too. In the atmosphere of American egalitarianism, should not the peasant couple be able to have as tasteful a wedding as the aristos? (I know they probably don't want it; but can't it be offered to them?)   > for one thing, nobody will put down > their little flash cameras to pick up a hymnal or a service-booklet > (grin); for another, it's like nobody ever saw a gal in a white dress > before ... they all gotta "oooh" and "ahhhh" through the whole > processional. > > And I'm talkin' about a HIGH Anglican church here, folks. The Good Lord > only KNOWS what goes on ELSEWHERE.   I dig it, Bud. I've been to Anglican masses in San Diego. (I was VERY impressed--Jan.-Mar. 1956; don't recall the parish, but I was in big awe.) > > Oh well, that's California. > That's one of the considerations, of course. HOW HIGH, or FOR WHOM, = would a wedding have to be to guarantee total devout attention to the mass and = the nuptials, with NO NO NO silly considerations even existent? Advent, = Boston? Advent, San Fran? Nashotah House? (Ooops; they don't have same-sex marriages in Wisconsin yet.)   Tee hee. Please; nobody: No offense intended. Bud's a DEAR friend of mine. Just relax, OK?   Alan, getting too sassy for his britches      
(back) Subject: Re: Bagpipes and organs From: "alan spence" <alan.spence@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 10:09:12 +1200   Having heard the Rieger organ in St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh several times, I still dislike its harshness and shrieking. Seeing the discussion on bagpipes has finally given me the answer. It is meant to sound like bagpipes! How obviously appropriate. Alan alan.spence@xtra.co.nz      
(back) Subject: Re: A loverly wedding From: <MFoxy9795@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 18:22:26 -0400   what a great story about fenner. merry   In a message dated Sun, 14 Jul 2002 6:21:44 AM Eastern Standard Time, = manderusa@earthlink.net writes:   > > At Oberlin, my teacher was Fenner Douglass, a truly wonderful teacher, = but > ah so musically and liturgically pure. The wedding of the century was > scheduled for Finney Chapel toward the end of term time one year, that = of > the daughter of the president of the college. The family pleaded for the > Mendelssohn, and also would consider no other organist but Fenner. I can > still hear him saying to us in organ class: "OK, if they want the > Mendelssohn, they will get the Mendelssohn, all of it." Many of us = students > occupied places in the balcony, high over the console, and, by God, they = got > their Mendelssohn in full measure, and it was magnificent. The bride and > groom went out to what they had wanted to hear, and most of the rest of = us > stayed to hear the rest of the transcription, to its happy > ending, this > followed by great cheers. What joy and fun. Why in hell not!      
(back) Subject: Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 12:58:19 +1200   > It might be interesting to trace it >back to the inventors of the instrument.   Thanks, Ron. I have several books on the history of the pipes. = Fascinating. They certainly are very ancient in origin. The present Highland pipes only became what they are now about 200 years ago, or maybe a little earlier. = Not very long at all, really. I've even been just a few inches away from the historic pipes in Dunvegan Castle, Skye, where I spent a most pleasant couple of hours with the head of the MacLeod clan.   In case anyone's wondering: I wouldn't even attempt to make any organ = pipes sound like the bagpipes, even if I had the skill! Entirely the wrong tone, and most certainly not blend with organ pipes. Yuk. Having said that, though, bagpipes and organ work wonderfully well together.   When I was in Carlisle, a young busker was playing, most skilfully, a set = of Northumbrian pipes. I'd love to see these become more common. Of course = many European countries still have the bagpipes in one form or another, like = the cornemeuse and the zampogna. There is a double CD with at least a dozen varieties of bagpipes on it.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 13:08:17 +1200   Now, hearing >all this talk of bagpipes, I wouldn't mind seeing if there were any = chance I >could master it, at least to some degree. > >Are there any self-help booklets available on learning the bagpipes? If so, >can you point me in the right direction?   Hi, Dave,   Yes, there are diy books on learning the pipes, but you must avoid them. = The only way to learn is from a competent pipes, otherwise you'll be in all kinds of trouble. Seriously, all you'd do is make fiendishly difficult problems to unlearn later, if you tried to teach yourself.   The pipes, like most instruments, are fairly easy to play appallingly, difficult to play well, and exceptionally difficult to play exceptionally well. They used to say in Scotland many years ago that they'd take on a pupil for seven years and then decide at that time if the fellow was worth teaching. Something in that.   My organ teacher, Maxwell Fernie, never played the pipes but was proud of his Highland ancestry and loved the pipes next to the organ and the human voice, though he was a fine cellist and pianist as well as organist.   For playing music, I prefer sustained tone. That's the only thing I have = in common in the instruments I really enjoy - woodwind of all orchestral = kinds, the recorder family, organ, pipes. No, that can't really be true, either, because (like most pipers) I regard brass bands as a collection of tuned washing-machines.   Ross    
(back) Subject: RE: loverly wedding From: "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 21:55:39 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C22B81.3137A0E0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I must chime in with a frustrated posting. Again, today at church, =3D "special music" was a female duet with CD accompaniment. And yes, it =3D was followed by applause. Make sure you are all sitting down for this: = =3D our choir (I have no control over the choir--there is a separate "choir = =3D director") has not used the organ for accompaniment for an anthem in =3D more than 4 years. <pick yourselves up off the floor now> This =3D includes Christmas, Easter (we have no Good Friday service) and all =3D other services you could come up with. I have offered numerous times to = =3D accompany the choir (even with a typical Tom Fettke, Fred Bock type of =3D anthem) only to fall on deaf ears (perhaps it could be all the =3D over-amplified CD music). My two biggest frustrations are the fact =3D that, one, they have an organist that desires to accompany the choir (or = =3D anyone else) and has made that desire known, and two, the people of the = =3D congregation are not being allowed to hear different (and better) kinds = =3D of worship/sacred music. I struggle weekly with how to help our =3D congregation to worship with artfully crafted music. If I desire to =3D play any of the "classics" of organ music, it tends to have to be on my = =3D own time; and even then, the pastor generally wishes I wouldn't play so = =3D loud as the pedal division's speaker cabinets are directly above his =3D study. I wonder if anyone else struggles with the same difficulties.   Regards, Jonathan Humbert Word of Life Chapel Elizabethtown, PA jhumbert@ptd.net   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C22B81.3137A0E0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2716.2200" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">I must chime in with a = frustrated=3D20 posting.&nbsp; Again, today at church, "special music" was a female duet = =3D with CD=3D20 accompaniment.&nbsp; And yes, it was followed by applause.&nbsp; Make =3D sure you=3D20 are all sitting down for this:&nbsp; our choir (I have no control over =3D the=3D20 choir--there is a separate "choir director") has not used the organ = for=3D20 accompaniment for an anthem in more than 4 years.&nbsp; &lt;pick =3D yourselves up=3D20 off the floor now&gt;&nbsp; This includes Christmas, Easter (we have no = =3D Good=3D20 Friday service) and all other services you could come up with.&nbsp; I =3D have=3D20 offered numerous times to accompany the choir (even with a =3D typical&nbsp;Tom=3D20 Fettke, Fred Bock type of anthem) only to fall on deaf ears (perhaps it = =3D could be=3D20 all the over-amplified CD music).&nbsp; My&nbsp;two biggest frustrations = =3D are the=3D20 fact that, one, they have an organist that desires to accompany the =3D choir (or=3D20 anyone else) and has made that desire known, and two, the people of = the=3D20 congregation are not being allowed to hear different (and better) kinds = =3D of=3D20 worship/sacred music.&nbsp; I struggle weekly with how to help our =3D congregation=3D20 to worship with artfully crafted music.&nbsp; If I desire to play any of = =3D the=3D20 "classics" of organ music, it tends to have to be on my own time; and =3D even then,=3D20 the pastor generally wishes I wouldn't play so loud as the pedal =3D division's=3D20 speaker cabinets are directly above his study.&nbsp; I wonder if=3D20 anyone&nbsp;else struggles with the same difficulties.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">Regards,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">Jonathan Humbert</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">Word of Life Chapel</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">Elizabethtown, PA</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style"><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:jhumbert@ptd.net">jhumbert@ptd.net</A></FONT></DIV></BODY>= =3D </HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_002B_01C22B81.3137A0E0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks Felix (cross posted) From: <MyrtleBeachMusic@aol.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 22:00:33 EDT     --part1_1bf.775d571.2a6386c1_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/14/02 7:04:22 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:     > He doesn't need > gimiky shoes or clothing, he's got his head screwed on straight, and = just > carries you along and blows you away, breath and all. >   Diane Bish doesn't need fancy shoes or clothing either, but it's an added bonus when watching her play for most people....deal with it. Many = concert organists (especially ladies) actually "dress up".....what's wrong with = it? Also, you (if applicable) and all the other elitists in the organist community should be doing anything BUT snubbing your nose at or speaking = ill of Ms. Bish as she has done more to promote the organ to the masses than = ANY of you EVER will. Perhaps that's it....you're all jealous that she can = pack in an audience no matter where she goes while your AGO events (generally a =   safe example), meant to attract "crowds", have pitiful attendance which questions the necessity of even turning on the A/C come concert time. As = I recall, Virgil Fox was an object of the same indignant = snubbing....probably for much the same jealous reason.   So, who's next.....Felix? Once he gets to the point in life (not far off) =   where his age isn't such a contributing factor to his fame, will he then = also be relegated to this select list of "novelty organists"? After all, "I've =   been workin' on the railroad" in Vierne and frequent use of "organ en chamade" simply CAN'T be allowed, for it would make the organ in concert a =   joke. HA!....yeah right. The reason these people can/do/did pack in the masses is because the people knew they would be ENTERTAINED and not need = to load up on coffee beforehand to stay awake!   I offer apology in advance to the countless people on this list that I = have likely offended in this post. However, it really BURNS me up when people continue to criticize one of the great proponents of the organ for petty reasons. I for one attribute my choice to become a professional organist = to seeing those very hands flying about the 5 manuals of the Coral Ridge = organ on TV. I have no doubt that I am in good company in that respect.   Felix, keep doing exactly what you're doing....promoting the organ while entertaining the pants off your audiences. We need more of you and less = of "them".   Jeremy   --part1_1bf.775d571.2a6386c1_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 7/14/02 7:04:22 PM Eastern = Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">He doesn't = need<BR> gimiky shoes or clothing, he's got his head screwed on straight, and = just<BR> carries you along and blows you away, breath and all.<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Diane Bish doesn't need fancy shoes or clothing either, but it's an added = bonus when watching her play for most people....deal with it.&nbsp; Many = concert organists (especially ladies) actually "dress up".....what's wrong = with it?&nbsp; Also, you (if applicable) and all the other elitists in the = organist community should be doing anything BUT snubbing your nose at or = speaking ill of Ms. Bish as she has done more to promote the organ to the = masses than ANY of you EVER will.&nbsp; Perhaps that's it....you're all = jealous that she can pack in an audience no matter where she goes while = your AGO events (generally a safe example), meant to attract "crowds", = have pitiful attendance which questions the necessity of even turning on = the A/C come concert time.&nbsp; As I recall, Virgil Fox was an object of = the same indignant snubbing....probably for much the same jealous = reason.<BR> <BR> So, who's next.....Felix?&nbsp; Once he gets to the point in life (not far = off) where his age isn't such a contributing factor to his fame, will he then also be relegated to this select list = of "novelty organists"?&nbsp; After all, "I've been workin' on the = railroad" in Vierne and frequent use of "organ en chamade" simply CAN'T be = allowed, for it would make the organ in concert a joke. HA!....yeah = right.&nbsp; The reason these people can/do/did pack in the masses is = because the people knew they would be ENTERTAINED and not need to load up = on coffee beforehand to stay awake!<BR> <BR> I offer apology in advance to the countless people on this list that I = have likely offended in this post.&nbsp; However, it really BURNS me up = when people continue to criticize one of the great proponents of the organ = for petty reasons.&nbsp; I for one attribute my choice to become a = professional organist to seeing those very hands flying about the 5 = manuals of the Coral Ridge organ on TV.&nbsp; I have no doubt that I am in = good company in that respect.<BR> <BR> Felix, keep doing exactly what you're doing....promoting the organ while = entertaining the pants off your audiences.&nbsp; We need more of you and = less of "them".<BR> <BR> Jeremy</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1bf.775d571.2a6386c1_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Krumhorn From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 21:36:35 -0500   Free reeds are just that....like the reed in a harmonium, harmonica, etc. There is a "shallot"...but the reed does not beat against a surface, but passes back and forth in the opening.   Jon Bertschinger Tonal Director Temple Organs Saint Joseph, MO (North Kansas City area)  
(back) Subject: Re: Traditional wedding marches From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 21:42:12 -0500   Alan Freed wrote:   > Does "clich=E9" take an acute accent or grave?   Well, normally an acute, but doesn't that make it into something of a clich=E9 in itself. Using an acute accent is so hackneyed. Perhaps we should break the mold and use a grave accent instead <g>   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: Bagpipes, formerly lots of topics From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 21:56:36 -0500   Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > > > It might be interesting to trace it > >back to the inventors of the instrument. > > Thanks, Ron. I have several books on the history of the pipes. = Fascinating. > They certainly are very ancient in origin. The present Highland pipes = only > became what they are now about 200 years ago,   Highland pipes -- 200 years? I thought Wicks had only been in business 96 years.   John.