PipeChat Digest #2972 - Thursday, July 18, 2002
 
Freight Train Music
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: Freight Train Music
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Bach Wedding Cantata
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: Bach Wedding Cantata
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  the end, at last (LONG)
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music
  by "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com>
Fwd: Dona Nobis Read -Through and Performance
  by "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Freight Train Music From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 06:52:53 -0500   I'm glad this came up (see Glenda's remarks, below). Early this year I wrote a toccata for organ in C Major. I've already written two others in this key over many years, and I need to give this a distinctive name. It's on the short side, so I thought of = Toccatina. But the opening, repeating 16th-note motif for the two hands reminded me = of a steam locomotive (CHUGG-a-chugg-a, CHUGG-a-chugg-a) and I was tempted to give it a subtitle of "choo-choo". I suppose one could even start slower = and accelerate into the suggested tempo to imitate the steam locomotive's attempts to get itself going after sitting idle. But the piece is not an attempt to be silly or goofy and it goes on to other manual figurations as the pedal repeats "the big tune" and the work evolves to a full-organ ending.   Any suggestions for a title? "Toccatina" is a bit boring and perhaps trifling; it's a serious, yet fun, piece that deserves a better name.   Your help is appreciated. Many thanks, Bob Lind             Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> 07/16/2002 09:59 PM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music     Regarding "freight train music", it is a term invented by myself after the 1996 AGO National Convention and my exposure to the works commissioned for that occasion. I came back and told my organ teacher that I heard a lot of freight train music. He asked me what that was, and I replied that it was music generally of twentieth century composition which sounds like a freight train coming, the freight train's arrival, and the freight train's departure. This from one who has lived within a baseball's throw of the train tracks all her life except for the 3 years of law school and the last 5 years.   If you use my term, it is copyrighted, and you must properly attribute it to Glenda, the Good Witch of the South.      
(back) Subject: Re: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 08:03:15 -0500   Glenda wrote: > > Regarding "freight train music", it is a term invented by myself after > the 1996 AGO National Convention and my exposure to the works > commissioned for that occasion. I came back and told my organ teacher > that I heard a lot of freight train music. He asked me what that was, > and I replied that it was music generally of twentieth century > composition which sounds like a freight train coming, the freight > train's arrival, and the freight train's departure. This from one who > has lived within a baseball's throw of the train tracks all her life > except for the 3 years of law school and the last 5 years.   Talking of freight trains, I have always been fascinated by the middle section of Franck's Pastorale. The piece starts off as a normal-sounding pastorale, but then comes this animated section in the middle -- and I do not mean to be disparaging by saying this -- that sounds like a freight train going right through the middle of the meadow. I somehow wonder if this might have been what was in Franck's mind, some kind of comment on nineteenth-century industrialization.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: RE: Freight Train Music From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 09:10:17 -0400   Also if it has a big ending no matter how short it is the -ina is = deceptive and just sounds incorrect to and Italian speaking ear. -ina, as I'm sure = you all know, is, of course, a diminutive but carries and connotation of cuteness and small stature. If this is a "heavy" or somewhat "heavy" = piece, i.e., big and full, Toccatina would be too "light" a word. The "CHUGG-a-chugg-a" itself as described below, to ME, at least, leans toward big and weighty and grand. Is it published? I'd love to hear it. Just the brief description you give has me wanting to hear it. If you keep Toccata I'd make it Toccata breve. How about calling it Grande Vitesse [sp?] Fast and insinuates the idea of the fast train. RBC     -- It's on the short side, so I thought of Toccatina.    
(back) Subject: Bach Wedding Cantata From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 08:54:34 -0700   I have an urgent, immediate need for a vocal score copy of the Bach Wedding Cantata, BWV 202. Does anyone out there have one? If so, please email me off-list. Thank you.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Wedding Cantata From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 13:06:38 -0400   Kalmus publishes this work, catalog No. 6638, with German and English = text.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   > From: Del Case <dcase@puc.edu> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 08:54:34 -0700 > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Bach Wedding Cantata > > > > I have an urgent, immediate need for a vocal score copy > of the Bach Wedding Cantata, BWV 202. Does anyone out > there have one? If so, please email me off-list. > Thank you. > > Del W. Case > Pacific Union College > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: the end, at last (LONG) From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 12:27:01 -0700 (PDT)   Dr. Hall's Tour of the UK in the Year of Grace 2002.   Part Five: I Am Sent Down     Robert Frost says:   Nature=92s first green is gold, her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf=92s a flower, but only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf; so Eden came to grief, so dawn subsides to day. Nothing gold can stay.   Alas, nothing gold can stay...I had to leave Oxford on the afternoon of the 8th, after my recital and a splendid lunch with Clive at another local pub. Clive Driskill-Smith=92s graciousness is as world-class as his musical abilities.   I got on the train at the last second=97the conductor shouting =93=92Urry = up, then!=94 as I bounded on board. The whole world looked gray and dull to me=97not only because it was raining again.   I had the hotel address wrong. I thought I was at Leicester Square, and duly decamped from the Tube right near this swinging and youth-full area=97it reminded me of a slightly more genteel Washington Square, with more greenery and fewer crack dealers.   Alas, I was all wrong. My hotel was not in this utterly invigorating part of London, but in the similar-sounding Leinster Gardens=97and I shudder at any and all place names tha tcontain the word =93gardens.=94 Oh, well, I got back on the Tube and out to Queensway. Immediately I was face to face with mean little Times Square- like shops selling awful tourist knickknacks.   I mean panties with =93MIND THE GAP=94 printed across the crotch. That kind of awful stuff. The kind of place that I would call, in perfect French, a =93shitterie.=94   Currency exchanges.   =93Authentick=94 fish and chips restaurants.   All complete with Singapore-style =91touts=92 harrassing the passersby...=94Hey, Mistah Young Guy, you coming in right now to Engrish Chippy, cheap, cheap--ten quid!!!=94 and all that. I didn=92t want to = eat in, or meet, an English chippy!   I was in the ninth circle of TOURIST HELL.   What did I do to deserve this? I have an English name with the DNA to go with it, I speak the language, share much of the culture, practice the official state religion, eat a lot of lamb, and have always put milk in my tea; and for this, I am sent to The Island of Misfit Toys?   I felt a little better as I passed the royal park of Kensington and realized that there were some interesting things to do and see here. But still, I was tense the whole time I was in the hotel. When someone spoke to me in the elevator, I was sorely tempted to reply in Esperanto.   My room had a ghastly view of the underground tracks, which are exposed between Queensway and Bayswater. The telly had no sound. I felt like I was in a not-very-funny British sitcom somewhere between the end of =93Benny Hill=94 and the beginning of =93Are You Being Served?=94 (I mean = in terms of American programing.)   Absolutely Fabulous it was not.   It was especially painful as I recalled the previous night in Oxford! As Dante says in the =93Inferno,=94 the double grief of a lost bliss is to recall its happy hour in pain. (Ciardi=92s translation.)   But I made the best of it. I tubed it to Soho and had curry in the midst of a weird conglomeration of curry houses and strip joints. What do these two have in common besides spiciness? (It=92s not a = riddle=97I=92d really like to know!)   Then I came back, got a snack at Kentucky Fried Chicken and a beer in a grocery store for 99 pence and went to bed.   And the next morning I went downstairs for a bit of breakfast. I got there early...and a good thing, because breakfast consisted of great plastic tubs full of generic cereals. In ten minutes, a little boy would sneeze abundantly into one of them. I ate, drank coffee, and fled.   London on a Sunday! This would make up for mine hostelry. Today, June 9, would be one of the happiest days of my life. I spent it all in church.   I began with Mass at my sister parish, All Hallows by the Tower. I was kindly mentioned during Mass, and was invited to bring up the elements. The organist, Prof. Melling, played very, very beautifully. Afterwards, he and I went out for lunch. We went to a touristy-esque place on the Thames near the Tower. The English Sunday Dinner (or what I would call a =93typical=94 Sunday dinner) was available for about seven pounds....roast beef, roast potatoes, and so forth.   After this, Prof. Melling insisted on accompanying me part way on my journey on the Tube. We eventually parted to many expressions of friendship.   I got to Westminster Abbey, and after wandering the cloister for a while (and finding Muzio Clementi=92s grave, and honoring my five-greats-grandteacher with a silent prayer) I went in to Evensong. (The genealogy goes Grace Kromer=97Kate Chittenden, AGO=97Albert Ross Parsons=97Theodor Kullak=97Franz Liszt=97Karl Czerny, also a pupil of Beethoven=97Clementi.)   The ushers were very, very gracious and showed me a seat in the Choir. the coat of arms over my head at Stall number 20 read =93Archididascalus,=94 which is Latinized Greek for =93Head Teacher.=94 = Since I could translate it, I felt justified sitting there! :)   James O=92 Donnell conducted the men in a wonderful service. There was a baritone aria by Stanford, ending with a quiet chorale=97I can=92t recall the name, but will post it eventually=97a great anthem! The psalmody was remarkably sensitive, too. This was the only service in my whole time in the UK where I could sing lustily; because it was the only time the tunes were made available! For all the other services, there were texts only=97a lamentable practice, worsened by the customarily truncated organ introductions.   Evensong over, I went on, in the rain, to Saint Bartholomew the Great in the Old City, hard by the site where Ben Franklin apprenticed as a printer. I went there on Simon Nieminski=92s recommendation, as he=92d also served that church. It is the oldest church structure in London, having neither burned nor been bombed. Evensong there was very Anglo-Catholic, and quite excellent, and concluded with Latin to the delight of my little papist heart.   I then met the American verger, John Caster, who I found to be delightful. I ended up drinking near the Smithfield market with the lay-clerks. One drinks a lot in Britain.   The next day, Monday, I wandered about the city, largely with John, with whom I rendezvoused (rendezvood?) outside the British Museum. Drank at a succession of famous pubs, including Gilbert and Sullivan=92s favorite Coal Hole, and Dr. Johnson=92s favorite, the Cheshire Cheese, and the Cittie of York, founded in 14-aught. Also attended Evensong at Saint Paul=92s. There was a visiting college choir there, which did a very fine job. This time I sat in the nave, which made me feel a little distant from the action, but the acoustics were dazzling.   That night, my last in England, I attended a theatre organ recital given by Donald McKenzie. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and I also had an interesting, fleeting encounter. While waiting with my host, a Person of imposing bearing came up and addressed him in American English! They exchanged pleasantries, and then Colin said, =93And do you know Dr. Jonathan Hall from America?=94 The Person said a remarkably quick hello and excused himself just as quickly!   It was assumed I would know this Person=92s name, because though I was presented to Him, He was not presented to me! Still, we shook hands.   Well:   I was subsequently treated to a lovely Italian dinner, and enjoyed meeting Mr. McKenzie, who really played beautifully and knew how to talk to an audience as well.   The next day, I managed to sneak in a visit to Eton on my way to the airport. There is an excellent pharmacy there, where I bought some lovely rosewater; and an antique shop, where I got some antique English silver; and the standard was flying over Windsor Castle, which signified the presence of Majesty.   I had plenty of time to browse the airport=92s duty-free mega-mall, and then got home to NYC after a very pleasant ride on British Airways. (One of my parishioners was two rows in front of me!) I highly recommend British Airways=97they did a very fine job, the food and wine were excellent, and I will be using them again.   That=92s it.   ----------fin de l=92histoire--------------     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Autos - Get free new car price quotes http://autos.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music From: "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 20:37:14 +0000   Glenda and List - Thanks for the response - I too used to live right next to the tracks, and = I see what you mean about some (not all!) modern organ music being like the passage of a large freight train. Especially when the train stops for a short time, and then starts with the crash of all the hitches between each =   car being strained to their limits.   As for the Alain Litanies, they are quite nice. I have them on an LP by = John Fenstermaker on the S.F. Grace Cathedral organ.   David Carter in sunny Sacramento, where we still don't have a budget!   P.S. I hope you won the battle with the scumbag lawyers!   Glenda wrote: >Regarding "freight train music", ...   _________________________________________________________________ Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Fwd: Dona Nobis Read -Through and Performance From: "Rev. Ed" <edwardorgan@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 00:09:45 +0000         >From: "Mr Ed" <choraled@hotmail.com> >To: choralist@lists.colorado.edu, church-music@yahoogroups.com, >ed-d@excite.com, edwardorgan@hotmail.com >CC: AccompaList@yahoogroups.com, choraltalk@lists.colorado.edu >Subject: Fwd: Dona Nobis Read -Through and Performance >Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 00:05:40 +0000 > >THis is a message from one of the best choral directors in the United >States; Richard Mathey- Retired Professor of Choral Activities at Bowling =   >Green State University. I thought the those who might be in the Ohio = area >might want to take advantage of this opportunity. >E. Dawson, D.Min > > >>Subject: FW: Dona Nobis Read -Through and Performance > >On Wed 07/17, Richard D. Mathey (rdmathey@dacor.net) wrote: > > Hello Friends: > > Just wanted to drop a quick note to let you know that on Tuesday >evening,July 23, I will be directing a reading of Ralph Vaughan Williams >"Dona Nobis Pacem". The event will take place at the University of Toledo =   >in the music building. We will rehearse work, take a break and come back >and perform itfrom beginning to end. A very informal setting.This major >choral work is one of Ralph Vaughan Williams's finest choral = compositions. >The cantata takes about 40 minutes to perform and is scoredfor chorus, >orchestra, and soloists (soprano and baritone). > We will use piano for the process. Tracy Wolstoncroft is the soprano =   >and John Glannthe baritone who will assist.Scores have been rented from = the >New York Choral Society. To assist in the expense of this read through, >there is a $5 registration fee.I encourage you to attend and participate = by >singing in the chorus. > If you are not familiar with this particular cantata, you will want = to >experiencea score with powerful texts. >I Agnus Dei >II Beat! Beat! Drums! (Walt Whitman) >III Reconciliation (Walt Whitman) >IV Dirge for Two Veterans (Walt Whitman) >V The Angel of Death (John Bright) >Is there not balm in Gilead? (Jeremiah VIII. 15-22) >A man greatly beloved (Daniel X. 9) >Nation shall not lift up a sword against nation (adapted from Micah >iv.3,Leviticus xxxvi. 6, Psalms 1xxxv. 10, cxviii. 19, Isaiah xliii, 9, >andlxvi. 18-22, and Luke ii. 14) >Would love to have you with us. > >It begins at 7:00 p.m. > >R.D. Mathey >         _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx