PipeChat Digest #2973 - Thursday, July 18, 2002
 
Faculty recitals at Rochester POE
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
summer recitals at Epiphany
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: Faculty recitals at Rochester POE
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Wedding music I don't have
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: A loverly Greek wedding
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: A loverly Greek wedding
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Faculty recitals at Rochester POE From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 08:11:28 EDT     --part1_de.2a2d5486.2a680a70_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi, Y'all!   Greetings from the Pipe Organ Encounter 2002 from Rochester, NY. It's a wonderful thing, this POE. It's fun, full of good information, good = faculty, great fellowship and lotsa good music making.   Just for your info, here's the list of pieces played for both faculty recitals here. The first was Monday night and the second was last night. Every faculty member has performed in public during the week. David Higgs played the Liszt BACH before his masterclass, and Cherry Rhodes play the Guillou piece she played (can you tell I've forgotten the name) before her =   masterclass. Todd Wilson and Tom Trenney shared the organ during the = "Phantom of the Opera" movie. The rest of us performed on two concerts.   At Asbury UMC (big ol' Austin) Widor: Allegro Vivace (from Symphonie V) played by Huw Lewis Vierne: Adagio (from Symphonie III) played by Allison Evans Henry Bolcom: Free Fantasia on "O Zion Haste and "How Firm" played by Martin = Jean Dupont: Meditation played by Duane Prill Bach: Toccata and Fugue in F played by Jonathan Biggers Thalben-Ball: Elegy played by Darryl Miller Litaize: Scherzo, Variations sur un noel angevin played by Jeremy Tarrant   At Church of the Ascension (big ol' EM Skinner) Langlais: Te Deum played by Ann Labounsky Franck: Choral 2 in b minor played by Peter Dubois Fileuse, Final (sept pieces) played by Christopher Markis Albright: Jig for the Feet (Totentanz) played by Dianne Christensen Searle Wright: Lyric Rhapsody played by Andy Kotylo Guilmant: Final (Sonata I) played by Neil Cockburn   It's hot up here in NY state . . . and . . . most of the churches are = without air conditioning. That's no fun!   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea   --part1_de.2a2d5486.2a680a70_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hi, Y'all! <BR> <BR>Greetings from the Pipe Organ Encounter 2002 from Rochester, NY. It's = a wonderful thing, this POE. It's fun, full of good information, good = faculty, great fellowship and lotsa good music making. <BR> <BR>Just for your info, here's the list of pieces played for both faculty = recitals here. The first was Monday night and the second was last night. = Every faculty member has performed in public during the week. David Higgs = played the Liszt BACH before his masterclass, and Cherry Rhodes play the = Guillou piece she played (can you tell I've forgotten the name) before her = masterclass. Todd Wilson and Tom Trenney shared the organ during the = "Phantom of the Opera" movie. The rest of us performed on two concerts. <BR> <BR>At Asbury UMC (big ol' Austin) <BR>Widor: Allegro Vivace (from Symphonie V) played by Huw Lewis <BR>Vierne: Adagio (from Symphonie III) played by Allison Evans Henry <BR>Bolcom: Free Fantasia on "O Zion Haste and "How Firm" played by Martin = Jean <BR>Dupont: Meditation played by Duane Prill <BR>Bach: Toccata and Fugue in F played by Jonathan Biggers <BR>Thalben-Ball: Elegy played by Darryl Miller <BR>Litaize: Scherzo, Variations sur un noel angevin played by Jeremy = Tarrant <BR> <BR>At Church of the Ascension (big ol' EM Skinner) <BR>Langlais: Te Deum played by Ann Labounsky <BR>Franck: Choral 2 in b minor played by Peter Dubois <BR>Fileuse, Final (sept pieces) played by Christopher Markis <BR>Albright: Jig for the Feet (Totentanz) played by Dianne Christensen <BR>Searle Wright: Lyric Rhapsody played by Andy Kotylo <BR>Guilmant: Final (Sonata I) played by Neil Cockburn <BR> <BR>It's hot up here in NY state . . . and . . . most of the churches are = without air conditioning. That's no fun! <BR> <BR>Yours, <BR> <BR>Darryl by the Sea</FONT></HTML>   --part1_de.2a2d5486.2a680a70_boundary--  
(back) Subject: summer recitals at Epiphany From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 06:21:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hi, all--   Well, silly me! I've been busy talking about the UK and bagpipes and whatnot, and haven't mentioned my summer organ recital series at Epiphany. Every Thursday now thru August 29, 12:15 to 12:45. It's free, you can bring your lunch in if you like, and while we don't have AC, the room is still a bit cooler than the street, and there is also a garden.   Plus, today, I intend to set out ice water on account of the expected triple-digit heat in Manhattan. Hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk, as we say. Today's program is French Classic music. The full series is available via my church website, www.epiphanynyc.org, or my personal website, www.jonathanbhall.com.   Cheers to one and all--stay cool!     Jon   NYC   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Autos - Get free new car price quotes http://autos.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Faculty recitals at Rochester POE From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 15:26:49 +0200 (CEST)   DarrylbytheSea@aol.com wrote: > ...and Cherry > Rhodes played the > Guillou piece she played (can you tell I've forgotten the > name) before her masterclass.   Wasn't it "The Turn of the Screw"??   Felix  
(back) Subject: RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 10:33:45 -0400   John Speller writes:   >I have always been fascinated by >the middle section of Franck's Pastorale. The piece starts >off as a normal-sounding pastorale, but then comes this >animated section in the middle -- and I do not mean to be >disparaging by saying this -- that sounds like a freight >train going right through the middle of the meadow. I >somehow wonder if this might have been what was in Franck's >mind, some kind of comment on nineteenth-century >industrialization.   This is a very interesting idea. I have postulated that this section, containing what could be described as symbolic cross figurations if they appeared in Bach, evokes Christ's Crucifixion and Atonement, after which = the two themes (man and God?) that appeared separately in the opening section are heard together in the third. This is pure conjecture, of course. = I've seen no evidence that Franck thought symbolically like Bach, but if you think of such a scheme as pictorialism instead, it might be more = plausible.   Your suggestion becomes credible when we bear in mind that the entire romantic movement began as a reaction to industrialization. I don't = recall from biographies what opinions Franck held or expressed about this environment, but Tournemire (all his life one of Franck's most ardent students and admirers) was definitely ill at ease with it. Could this be = a trait that both men had in common?   Either interpretation or both would be worth sharing with an audience for = an informal, non-academic performance (as possibilities rather than gospel-truth).    
(back) Subject: RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 10:40:26 -0400   >I too used to live right next to the tracks, and I see what you mean = about some (not all!) modern organ music being like the passage of a large freight train.   A certain Clementine parishioner who reminds me of Oscar Wilde refers to Dupre's "Chemin de la Croix" as "Chemin de Fer." (He is not an admirer of Dupre, at least not of that work.)      
(back) Subject: RE: Shchedrin, Bach, Alain, and Freight Train Music From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 11:04:12 -0400   Glenda wrote:   > I should hear Marie-Claire Alain's rendering of the Alain Litanies. = This morning I grabbed a handful of CDs on the way out the door. This = afternoon while having to detour out of my way home I listened to one, which = happened to be Marie-Claire's CD of toccatas, including the - you guessed it. It came to me that some things just sound better at a faster tempo, the Litanies being one.   Perhaps a couple months ago, a list member mentioned that (according to Marie-Claire) Jehan Alain wrote Litanies during a train trip and = humorously incorporated this experience into the music. What I heard from = Marie-Claire in my student days was that he wrote it in shock and grief over the death = of their sister Marie-Odile in an Alpine mountain-climbing accident. It doesn't seem to me that the two ideas are very compatible with each other. On the other hand, Jehan was apparently an unusual personality, and the French sensibility does seem particularly adept at the surreal and at absorbing, or at least juxtaposing, unlikely ingredients.      
(back) Subject: RE: Wedding music I don't have From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 11:59:40 -0400   >4. Wachet Auf : I have it, but would you veto it for a wedding in the beginning of November?   "Wake, awake, for night is flying" --rather a source of amusement at a wedding, don't ya think? Remind the "groom" of the incipit, and he might reconsider the idea on his own ;-)      
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 13:16:24 -0400   Malcolm writes:   > But, you know, there ain't no "negative connotations" anymore, and, most of the time, there never were. A couple that would = either know or care about the operatic significance of the Wagner and Mendelssohn pieces would be a rare thing indeed - possibly one in a million. The = Wagner is much loved by many for the perceived reality of its message which is, like it or not, "Here Comes the Bride." The Mendelssohn makes for a great and joyous ending, and since few know or care about its place in the Shakespeare play, for what earthly reason would one deny this music to = those who have loved it at their friends' weddings, and crave it for their own? This all sounds like ponderous Misery Synod thinking.   The fact that ignorance abounds is an argument *for* rather than *against* enlightening a couple as to the *truth* of the matter. I think that it is our duty to provide advice. If I discuss a planned or desired course of action with my lawyer, for example, and he doesn't think that it's a good idea, I would certainly want him to tell me so, and = explain why, before I go out and do something foolish.   If the *fact* is-- however obscure that *fact* might be-- that a piece of music has potentially embarrassing associations, isn't it professional malpractice blithely to go ahead and give it to a client without informing her of the risk? Dozens or hundreds of people will be attending the wedding, and it is hardly safe to assume that every one of them will be = just as heedless and subjective as herself. I could even add that I have played for dozens of weddings in Philadelphia main-line Episcopal churches in the past fifteen years, and although in most cases the couple could have the Wagner and Mendelssohn if they insisted, very few of these folk want them! I hear "please DON'T play here-comes-the-bride" much more often than = "please do." In other words, these wedding pieces are simply declasse now, so a couple using them are hardly putting their best feet forward socially and they should be aware of this. Maybe it doesn't matter to them, but often = it does.   If, knowing all that, they still have their hearts set on this music, o.k. When church policy doesn't prohibit these pieces, I wouldn't flat-out = refuse on my own to play them (as I might have done thirty years ago, when I was too worried about an imagined slur on *my* reputation by playing them); = but it's their funeral as the saying goes....   Paul      
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 13:47:45 -0400   Oh really. Relax, man. These people are getting married and at least one = of them is excited about and probably thought about how it would be for = his/her entire life. Let them have what they want. What does this have to do about you and YOUR reputation, for goodness sake. You are not--sorry--the = center of the universe...eppur si muove, goodness, Galileo among others told us that it's the sun around which it all moves! Advice? Fine. = Recommendations? Fine. A little music education? Fine. But if it's going to put a damper on the big "do", man, relax and let them enjoy their day. THEIR day. Geeze.       ++++ The fact that ignorance abounds is an argument *for* rather than *against* enlightening a couple as to the *truth* of the matter. I think that it is our duty to provide advice. If I discuss a planned or desired course of action with my lawyer, for example, and he doesn't think that it's a good idea, I would certainly want him to tell me so, and = explain why, before I go out and do something foolish.   If the *fact* is-- however obscure that *fact* might be-- that a piece of music has potentially embarrassing associations, isn't it professional malpractice blithely to go ahead and give it to a client without informing her of the risk? Dozens or hundreds of people will be attending the wedding, and it is hardly safe to assume that every one of them will be = just as heedless and subjective as herself. I could even add that I have played for dozens of weddings in Philadelphia main-line Episcopal churches in the past fifteen years, and although in most cases the couple could have the Wagner and Mendelssohn if they insisted, very few of these folk want them! I hear "please DON'T play here-comes-the-bride" much more often than = "please do." In other words, these wedding pieces are simply declasse now, so a couple using them are hardly putting their best feet forward socially and they should be aware of this. Maybe it doesn't matter to them, but often = it does.    
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 12:59:51 -0500   Is it part of the parody in the current film "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" = that these two pieces bracket the ceremony in a Chicago Greek Orthodox church when presumably such a church would not even have an organ?   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Emmons, Paul [mailto:pemmons@wcupa.edu] Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 12:16 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: A loverly wedding     Malcolm writes:   > But, you know, there ain't no "negative connotations" anymore, and, most of the time, there never were. A couple that would = either know or care about the operatic significance of the Wagner and Mendelssohn pieces would be a rare thing indeed - possibly one in a million. If, = knowing all that, they still have their hearts set on this music, o.k. When church policy doesn't prohibit these pieces, I wouldn't flat-out = refuse on my own to play them (as I might have done thirty years ago, when I was too worried about an imagined slur on *my* reputation by playing them); = but it's their funeral as the saying goes....   Paul       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: A loverly Greek wedding From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 14:09:08 -0400   In a message dated Thu, 18 Jul 2002 12:59:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, = pstorandt@okcu.edu writes:   > presumably such a church would not even have an organ?   There are indeed organs in at least some Greek Orthodox churches. I = attended the wedding of a friend at one out in the Maryland suburbs a few = years ago, and they periodically advertise for an organist with the AGO = placement service here.      
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 14:10:35 -0400   Robert Colasacco wrote:   >Oh really. Relax, man. These people are getting married and at least one = of them is excited about and probably thought about how it would be for = his/her entire life. Let them have what they want. What does this have to do about you and YOUR reputation, for goodness sake. You are not--sorry--the = center of the universe...eppur si muove, goodness, Galileo among others told us that it's the sun around which it all moves! Advice? Fine. = Recommendations? Fine. A little music education? Fine. But if it's going to put a damper on the big "do", man, relax and let them enjoy their day.   Isn't this what I already said?      
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly Greek wedding From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 13:21:57 -0500   David:   Thanks for the correction. I've not encountered organ music in a Greek Orthodox church myself.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: DudelK@aol.com [mailto:DudelK@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 1:09 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: A loverly Greek wedding     In a message dated Thu, 18 Jul 2002 12:59:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, pstorandt@okcu.edu writes:   > presumably such a church would not even have an organ?   There are indeed organs in at least some Greek Orthodox churches. I = attended the wedding of a friend at one out in the Maryland suburbs a few years = ago, and they periodically advertise for an organist with the AGO placement service here.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 11:40:15 -0700   I can find how to put a cautionary accidental in brackets, but I can't find how to put a NOTE in brackets ... as in the case of voices crossing with a note in common, and only one of the notes needs to be played.   Anybody know?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 15:00:33 -0400   Gee Paul, you're right, I guess it is. Sorry. Let's just say I wanted to reinforce what you said. RBC =3D=3D=3D.   Isn't this what I already said?        
(back) Subject: Re: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted) From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 20:01:43 +0100   Bud,   Use the Accidental keypad (press F12) and then the brackets are at the bottom to go round the accidental.   Hope this does what you want!   Steve Canterbury UK   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com>; "pipechat" = <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 7:40 PM Subject: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted)     > I can find how to put a cautionary accidental in brackets, but I can't > find how to put a NOTE in brackets ... as in the case of voices crossing > with a note in common, and only one of the notes needs to be played. > > Anybody know? > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted) From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 20:06:05 +0100   Doh! How stupid am I! Didn't read your post properly! ignore that then everyone!   Embarrassed Steve   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "organchat" <organchat@egroups.com>; "pipechat" = <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 7:40 PM Subject: SLIGHTLY OFF-TOPIC: Sibelius 1.4 help (X-posted)     > I can find how to put a cautionary accidental in brackets, but I can't > find how to put a NOTE in brackets ... as in the case of voices crossing > with a note in common, and only one of the notes needs to be played. > > Anybody know? > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >