PipeChat Digest #2976 - Sunday, July 21, 2002
 
Rochester P.O.E.(X-post)
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
RE: A loverly wedding
  by "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net>
Re: A loverly wedding
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Rochester P.O.E.(X-post) From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 08:43:32 -0400   I found myself in Rochester on business on last Wednesday and was able to "drop in" on the POE.   I was warmly greeted by the members of the AGO and especially Dr. Darryl Miller. As luck would have it, my timing allowed me to attend the Faculty Concert held Wednesday evening. Although Dr. Miller ( and others) have given an account of the event. There is one thing that struck me a bit odd.   Ann Labounsky mentioned in her comments that she had been the organist in this church many years before, but not with such a fine instrument. However, as soon as she started playing I was immediately aware that this could be nothing less than an original E.M. Skinner.   I spoke with her after the concert and she explained that the church had the foresight to purchase an original E.M. Skinner and install it UNALTERED, in 1968 ! Kudos to Church of the Ascension !   The organ (as well as the organists) were wonderful !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: RE: A loverly wedding From: "Jonathan" <jhumbert@ptd.net> Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 15:17:04 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C23000.81465A80 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I played for a Greek Orthodox wedding in Lancaster, PA, Greek Orthodox =3D church (imagine that!). Being uninformed, I anticipated a magnificent =3D organ in the balcony as I arrived for my meeting with the bride. =3D Imagine my surprise, when, up in the corner of the balcony, sat a small, = =3D unimposing Baldwin organ. Of course, I couldn't change my mind (as far = =3D as playing for the wedding) at this point. I put on a game face and =3D bravely helped the bride pick out music. The good thing was that the =3D whole service was done in both Greek and English (in other words, each =3D part was done essentially twice). The bad thing was, this made the =3D wedding almost twice as long. I guess next time I'll have a better idea = =3D of what to expect.   Jonathan Humbert   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C23000.81465A80 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2716.2200" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">I played for a Greek Orthodox =3D wedding in=3D20 Lancaster, PA, Greek Orthodox church (imagine that!).&nbsp; Being =3D uninformed, I=3D20 anticipated a magnificent organ in the balcony as I arrived for my =3D meeting with=3D20 the bride.&nbsp; Imagine my surprise, when, up in the corner of the =3D balcony, sat=3D20 a small, unimposing Baldwin organ.&nbsp; Of course, I couldn't change my = =3D mind=3D20 (as far as playing for the wedding) at this point.&nbsp; I put on a game = =3D face=3D20 and bravely helped the bride pick out music.&nbsp; The&nbsp;good thing =3D was that=3D20 the whole service was done in both Greek and English (in other words, =3D each part=3D20 was done essentially twice).&nbsp; The bad thing was, this made the =3D wedding=3D20 almost twice as long.&nbsp; I guess next time I'll have a better idea of = =3D what to=3D20 expect.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3D"Bookman Old Style">Jonathan =3D Humbert</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000B_01C23000.81465A80--    
(back) Subject: Re: A loverly wedding From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 17:52:25 EDT   Dear Jonathan:   Look at the bright side, even though the learning curve was acute, it is a great experience. You were lucky to have an organ at all, as most Eastern Churches don't use them. The same held true for the Occidental Church until the Benedictines convinced one and all that the organ wasn't a secular instrument. That happened sort of during the 100 years from 1371 and the Halberstadt Cathedral job. Winchester Cathedral was a trial balloon in about 870. It caught on Blockwerke and all. About 1450 keys got narrower and stops were invented and the rest was history. Organs became an ecleasiastical instrument, and for a long time priests built them, or taught others to build them. Dom Bedos was a French priest, and probably Benedictine. Organs were shunned by the Oriental Church until about 65 years ago as being too Western and decadant. :) Some Eastern priests still frown on organs. Now here's a challenge for some good pipe organ and electronic digital salesmen. The field is wide open. Organs up to the change of mind were considered naughty, secular and evil. Whoaaaa! :)   Ron Severin