PipeChat Digest #2983 - Thursday, July 25, 2002
 
RE: Organs/ church scenes in movies
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Saint-Saens and Dukas
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: Saint-Saens and Dukas
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
RE: Saint-Saens and Dukas
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Re: A New Album
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Organs/ church scenes in movies
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: A New Album
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: trashy organ music?
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Felix Hell in Saddle Brook, NJ - 7/22/02
  by "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net>
Re: Organs/ church scenes in movies
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
RE: Felix Hell in Saddle Brook, NJ - 7/22/02
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: trashy organ music?
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Organs/ church scenes in movies From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:43:07 -0400   Well, there was "The Nine Tailors," (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0071024) starring Ian Carmichael, as broadcast by the PBS Mystery program. This mini-series (four episodes, very well done yet too short IMHO to do full justice to the novel) has recently become available on DVD and I heartily recommend it. The book, dating from the 1930s with a story perhaps taking place in the late 20s, has been a personal favorite since my teens.   Many scenes are in the church or the churchyard, and a magnificent church = it is-- an unusually stunning one for a small village, as all the characters appreciate. I recall the organ being heard in only two scenes, where it = was presented rather condescendingly. It did not sound either impressive or well played. I was about to say that this is unfortunate, because an English church of that physical stature would just as likely have had an organ to match, as well as a really competent organist. However, if we = bear in mind that this church happened to be situated in a village with "no = more than 250 souls in all," as the vicar explained, I can see that the portrayal was probably authentic.   Another really wonderful and moving video from, I think, Masterpiece Theatre, is "Good Night, Mister Tom." (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0175680) This takes place in an English village during World War II. Mister Tom = is an old carpenter whose wife and child had died of scarlet fever while he = was at sea in the navy during or before World War I. He never got over his grief and became a crusty, reclusive curmudgeon. But he reputedly knew how to play the organ, so when the parish organist joined the army early in = the war, the vicar begged him to take over. He snarled and demurred at first, but being really a soft touch underneath, eventually consented. We get an amusing scene during a rehearsal, where he is playing the organ and = gruffly exhorting the choir.   Shortly thereafter, children evacuated from London are arriving in the village. When there prove to be more children than volunteers to house them, the woman in charge of placing them is too determined to take no for an answer even from Mr. Tom. Soon a notably shy and awkward ten-year-old, William, timorously ventures up to the door. Before long Mr. Tom deduces that this boy's mother in London is a religious nut and mental case who = has abused him severely, and his heart melts. Although quite intelligent, William is illiterate. Mr. Tom teaches him to read and write so that he = can join the others his age in the school as soon as possible rather than = being "put with the babies." While doing so he discovers that William has a = great talent for drawing and encourages him to develop this gift-- something his mother would never have done.   There is a pump-organ in Mr. Tom's house. He used to play it, or perhaps both he and his wife did, but he closed it up and never touched its keys after her death. One day William sits down and starts picking out notes = on it. Mr. Tom strides over, slaps the cover back down, and brusquely orders the lad never to touch the instrument again without his permission. Soon he and his friends would give William a surprise birthday party, the first time in his life that his birthday was celebrated in any way. During this party a neighbor woman begs Mr. Tom to accompany everyone on the = pump-organ so they can sing a few songs. He can't bring himself to spoil such a joyous occasion in the least by refusing, so he opens it and plays it for the first time in over twenty years. His playing the organ again is a symbol of the black clouds' lifting from his life.      
(back) Subject: Re: Saint-Saens and Dukas From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:29:32 -0400   At the hands of an organist who "doesn't get it," such "filler" becomes a conductor's nightmare. It's not like playing brilliant parts in Jongen or Poulenc, but it does take skill with registration and of note-playing to make it come off "just right." I know of one "well-known organist" who = made a mess of tghis work, much to his embarrassment.   Karl E. Moyer Lazncaster PA   > From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 14:55:35 -0400 > To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: RE: Saint-Saens and Dukas > > Whenever I listen to it I just think of the organ as "filler" or > "fullnesser" it seems only to serve to add fullness to the = orchestration. I > can't imagine anyone even having to practice the part very much. My = mental > image when I hear it is that they called in "some" organist to play this > part s/he's never seen before and s/he reads it right then and there!! = No > big whoop, you know what I mean. Although I think it's a lovely piece. = I > mean so Berj Zamcojian[sp?] is the organist on my album cover, but does = he > really want to be affilitated! Does this piece "make" the organist? > What? > Robert Colasacco > > -----Original Message----- > From: Karl Moyer [mailto:kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu] > Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 2:29 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Saint-Saens and Dukas > > >>> (1) I know that the organ actually participates in the symphony in > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Saint-Saens and Dukas From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:58:10 -0400   Robert Colasacco writes:   >Whenever I listen to it I just think of the organ as "filler" or "fullnesser" it seems only to serve to add fullness to the orchestration.   I agree. It is a symphony with an organ part, not a concerto for organ = and orchestra. I, too, like it very much, but it is rather strange that so = many recordings feature a big-name guest organist playing the part. We can be flattered by the producers' gesture: it indicates that in their opinion, this trouble and expense is worthwhile by causing more copies to be sold. In other words, they think that the organ is respected and loved and that there are a few organists with name recognition among non-organists.   The part itself, however, will disappoint anyone looking for pyrotechnics = or independent solo passages.      
(back) Subject: RE: Saint-Saens and Dukas From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:00:00 -0400   Well any piece not played well would sound bad. I'm sure there have been many non-"perfect" playings of the Saint Saens. But as far as it being a piece with many difficult hurdles to get over, I have to say I doubt that where the organ part is concerned. I don't say that , in fact, an organist is called in at the last minute to play I just think the piece sounds like it doesn't take much...MUCH, work to arrive at "perfection". It's a small part that seems not all that difficult to learn well.   -----Original Message----- From: Karl Moyer [mailto:kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu] Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 3:30 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Saint-Saens and Dukas     At the hands of an organist who "doesn't get it," such "filler" becomes a conductor's nightmare. It's not like playing brilliant parts in Jongen or Poulenc, but it does take skill with registration and of note-playing to make it come off "just right." I know of one "well-known organist" who = made a mess of tghis work, much to his embarrassment.   Karl E. Moyer Lazncaster PA   >  
(back) Subject: Re: A New Album From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:30:21 -0400   > Hope you enjoy it. > Larry Wheelock   Hi Larry, I got this and did indeed enjoy it, but double check the email address = that you have for me. The only one that I saw that was remotely close to one = of mine was "rs@www.alfar.com". I do have an address at www.alfar.com, but that's not it.   However it got to me, no matter. Thanks again!!!!   Cheers, TommyLee Whitlock Reston, VA      
(back) Subject: Re: Organs/ church scenes in movies From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:21:50 -0400   On 7/24/02 3:43 PM, "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > Well, there was "The Nine Tailors," > snip > Another really wonderful and moving video from, I think, Masterpiece > Theatre, is "Good Night, Mister Tom."   Paul: Thank you for excellent summaries/reviews. I remember reading and seeing Nine Tailors, but Mister Tom is a new one for me. Thanks again.   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: A New Album From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:33:47 -0400   > > Hope you enjoy it. > > Larry Wheelock   Apologies to the list.   The fact that my private reply to Larry went out to the list solves my mystery. (note: always check reply-to address in future!) My filters = didn't fire on Larry's message and it turned up in my inbox instead of my = pipechat box, which caused me minor confusion.   I did enjoy the pictures of the installation, though. Always fun to see = an new organ being installed! Thanks again, Larry!   Somewhat red-faced, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: trashy organ music? From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 10:14:47 +1200       >>Greg Homza writes: >> >> >I'm looking for GOOD TRASH, and especially humorous GOOD TRASH.   "Good trash" is not an oxymoron, I believe. There are times, to change the metaphor, when I don't want to read a "good" book. I want to read trash instead, and good trash. I used to read James Bond as it was good trash, = not bad trash, and it was also a giggle as it seemed to parody itself in the midst of the humour.   Look at food, similarly. Sometimes we want trash. And we know what we mean by good trash - certain takeaway outfits, for example.   Yes, Ives' "America" may be trash, but (even to an NZer) it's really wonderful trash. I still treasure my lp of it that E.Power Biggs sent me = so many years ago. Dubois is trash, but as some people discovered for the = first time at our Organists' Congress 7wks ago, it's often wonderful trash.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Saddle Brook, NJ - 7/22/02 From: "Marika E. Buchberger, LRPS" <marika57@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 18:15:10 -0400   As a matter of information, Felix will be back in New Jersey, at the Cathedral-Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark on Sunday, November 17 at = 4:00 p.m.   I understand the great Schantz is looking forward to seeing him again!!! = :o)   "COLASACCO, ROBERT" wrote:   > Gee Malcolm. If you keep writing them like this, and you always do, I = won't > have to actually ever go hear Felix play. I feel so exuberant just = reading > your writing about his playing. I feel as tough I'm hearing him play. = Why > you just make me twinkle. And my headache just disappeared too!!! > Robert Colasacco    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs/ church scenes in movies From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:19:57 -0500   On 7/24/02 10:20 AM, Hugh Drogemuller wrote:   > A month or so ago there was reference to an English movie with a > significant number of scenes shot in and around churches .Do any on the > list recollect the name of the movie?   Don't know this movie Hugh. But I just spent a morning playing the organ = at the relatively new Immanuel Pentacostal Church in Winnipeg for "The Mary = Kay Story" starring Shirley Maclaine. It was a blast. Working with a thrown together 40 voice choir (would you believe most choir members have other jobs during the day?!), we must have done "Onward Christian Soldiers" a hundred times today counting rehearsals and actual filming. And Miss Maclaine sat patiently through it all!   The instrument - a rather dreadful Baldwin with lighted drawknobs and an "ASP" MIDI extension unit which barely served the purpose at all. I certainly don't envy this congregation their instrument. But the choir worked out surprisingly well.   So if you happen to catch this movie sometime next year, think of me = kindly. It isn't my best work but it's the best work they would let me do!   Cheers, Russ Greene    
(back) Subject: RE: Felix Hell in Saddle Brook, NJ - 7/22/02 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 18:14:05 -0500   No, Robert, you must go hear Felix for yourself. As glowingly and wonderfully as Malcolm writes about him, hearing and seeing him are a "must" experience, quite unlike anything else (even drinking Yuengling beer!).   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of COLASACCO, ROBERT   Gee Malcolm. If you keep writing them like this, and you always do, I won't have to actually ever go hear Felix play. I feel so exuberant just reading your writing about his playing. I feel as tough I'm hearing him play. Why you just make me twinkle. And my headache just disappeared too!!! Robert Colasacco          
(back) Subject: Re: trashy organ music? From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 23:27:31 EDT     --part1_7f.2993a5ed.2a70ca23_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   For "good trash" that the congregation loves, go to the old Lorenz Gospel arrangement books from the 40's and 50's. Also Schuller had several. = Then there were the Mickelson arrangements of old hymn tunes. I find much of = the "regular" organ repertoire to be too "trashy" to use for church, = especially if it is so dissonant that all the notes sound like wrong notes. (At = least that is how our congregation would look at it). I have worked long and = hard on some music that I finally decided was inappropriate for a church = service. I play for an "audience of One," and want to give my best, even if it = seems like trash to some organists. Lee   --part1_7f.2993a5ed.2a70ca23_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>For "good trash" that = the congregation loves, go to the old Lorenz Gospel arrangement books from = the 40's and 50's. &nbsp;Also Schuller had several. &nbsp;Then there were = the Mickelson arrangements of old hymn tunes. &nbsp;I find much of the = "regular" organ repertoire to be too "trashy" to use for church, = especially if it is so dissonant that all the notes sound like wrong = notes. &nbsp;(At least that is how our congregation would look at it). = &nbsp;I have worked long and hard on some music that I finally decided was = inappropriate for a church service. &nbsp;I play for an "audience of One," = and want to give my best, even if it seems like trash to some organists. = &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7f.2993a5ed.2a70ca23_boundary--