PipeChat Digest #2986 - Saturday, July 27, 2002
 
Bilhorn folding organs
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
RE: Organs in Films
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Flutes are us
  by "lab" <labeaty@panix.com>
Re: trashy organ music?
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: trashy organ music?
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Flutes are us
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Flutes are us
  by "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com>
Re: trashy organ music?
  by "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Bilhorn folding organs From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 14:13:55 -0500   > THIS MESSAGE IS IN MIME FORMAT. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3110537635_21436660_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   These instruments were manufactured in Chicago IL between 1885 and the = early 1940's. Bilhorn instruments were also sold to Sears & Roebuck.   The folding instruments came in three basic styles: single reed, 3 1/2 octaves; double reed, 3 1/2 octaves; and double reed, 4 octaves. I = believe the double reed instruments usually had a divided keyboard and stops at 8' and 4'.   The cases were usually made of plywood and were quite durable. The reeds were voiced rather loudly for use outdoors.   The instruments are easy to restore IF a previous repair person has not = made repairs with duct tape and white glue!   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory   p.s. If you wish additional information, go to the Reed Organ Society website or the second edition of Robert Gellerman's "Reed Organ Atlas" Vestal Press, 1998. -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569   --MS_Mac_OE_3110537635_21436660_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Bilhorn folding organs</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY BGCOLOR=3D3D"#FFFFFF"> These instruments were manufactured in Chicago IL between 1885 and the = earl=3D y 1940's. &nbsp;Bilhorn instruments were also sold to Sears &amp; = Roebuck.<B=3D R> <BR> The folding instruments came in three basic styles: single reed, 3 1/2 = octa=3D ves; double reed, 3 1/2 octaves; and double reed, 4 octaves. &nbsp;I = believe=3D the double reed instruments usually had a divided keyboard and stops at = 8' =3D and 4'. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> The cases were usually made of plywood and were quite durable. &nbsp;The = re=3D eds were voiced rather loudly for use outdoors.<BR> <BR> The instruments are easy to restore <B><U>IF</U></B> a previous repair = pers=3D on has not made repairs with duct tape and white glue!<BR> <BR> Best wishes, &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Tom Gregory<BR> <BR> p.s. &nbsp;If you wish additional information, go to the Reed Organ = Society=3D website or the second edition of Robert Gellerman's &quot;Reed Organ = Atlas&=3D quot; Vestal Press, 1998.<BR> -- <BR> Thomas and Patricia Gregory<BR> 716 West College Avenue<BR> Waukesha WI &nbsp;USA<BR> 53186-4569<BR> </BODY> </HTML>   --MS_Mac_OE_3110537635_21436660_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: RE: Organs in Films From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 13:38:38 -0400   I don't know how many today have seen "Arthur" (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0082031). It is a comedy fun to watch from time to time. Arthur is a fabulously wealthy and 100% irresponsible, but lovable, young New Yorker who drinks far too much. By the end of the = movie, he has grown a little and is only 90% irresponsible.   Arthur's blue-blooded family has arranged a marriage for him with Susan, = the daughter of a nouveau-riche industrialist, which will make them even wealthier. They threaten to cut him off without a cent if he doesn't = marry Susan, and her father threatens him with bodily harm if he doesn't make = her happy. Susan is really a very nice girl, but Arthur doesn't want to marry her, especially when he suddenly falls in love with someone else. He = deals with this problem by just failing to show up for the wedding.   The wedding is at Saint Bartholomew's Church, and there are a few brief authentic (I think) exterior and interior scenes, including a two or three showing the organist forlornly playing away at his great console, trying = to pacify the congregation long after the ceremony should have started. How many of us haven't found ourselves in that position?   It's a rather silly story redeemed by the acting and occasional flashes of brilliance in the script. Sir John Gielgud did not disdain to produce a endearing and memorable character in Arthur's long-suffering valet/companion/father figure. And Arthur himself was the late Dudley Moore, quite a fine pianist (organist too?) who said he *loved* English cathedral music. This would be an unusual taste for a movie star, and = even more unusual for one to proclaim it enthusiastically. I've always liked = him because of that.   ---------------------------------------------------------   On a different plane entirely: "Les Amities Particulieres", a poignant tragedy filmed in black-and-white with haunting atmosphere. This French film from the 60s is now rare because it was so = controversial-- the censors may have lost the first battle, but they seem to have won the war once fickle audiences turned to later diversions. However, it is tremendously well done. Good luck finding it.   It is set in a large, strict Catholic boys' boarding school in 1920s = France. In the stark beginning, under opening credits, a young student is leading = a very aged blind priest along stone-vaulted cloisters and up to the = chapel's organ loft. As the priest sits down at the keys, the boy begins walking, = as it were, on two pedals against the case to pump the bellows. We have = heard nothing thus far, for a minute or two, but the echoing clack of footsteps = on stone pavements. Then the organ starts playing, and this sudden outburst = of music comes as a shock: startling and dramatic, even violent.   Later, the organist provides one of the few moments of comic relief. He = has just given a piano lesson to a boy struggling with Bach's A minor = invention and is getting up to leave. The student asks whether he can stay to practice, and the priest replies that he may, but it's a waste of time because he is a hopeless piano student. Unbeknownst to him, a friend of the student has sneaked into the room who is a much better pianist, and = sits down at the keyboard. As the priest starts down the hallway outside, he = is very puzzled at the fine playing he hears behind him.   The film's score is austere and sparse, making the organ even more = effective when it appears, as it usually does, behind many of the the most important and affecting scenes throughout.                
(back) Subject: Flutes are us From: "lab" <labeaty@panix.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 19:37:57 -0400 (EDT)   Hi.   Anyone know exactly what is a Flute a Fuseau? Is it a Koppelflute? How is it constructed?   And what about a Flauto Mirabilis? Is it similar to a Doppel Flute?   Thanks.        
(back) Subject: Re: trashy organ music? From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 20:21:27 EDT     --part1_30.2a62f4d3.2a734187_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   How's this for "trash."   TRUE CONFESSIONS OF A CHURCH ORGANIST by Leora E. Holcomb (c)   At a wedding I confess, as the soloist was not the best. To teach him to sing, Heavenly bells would have to ring; So he read as I did the rest.   I confess I tortured a baritone; The trouble he caused was uncondoned; A third higher I played; As he became plagued; As the high notes were more of a groan.   Much more I could write of my journey; A church organist is out of the ordinary; The pay's very poor; the dedication must be Pure; And our music is all to HIS Glory.   (2002)   Lee   --part1_30.2a62f4d3.2a734187_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>How's this for "trash." <BR> <BR>TRUE CONFESSIONS OF A CHURCH ORGANIST <BR>by Leora E. Holcomb (c) <BR> <BR>At a wedding I confess, <BR>as the soloist was not the best. <BR>To teach him to sing, <BR>Heavenly bells would have to ring; <BR>So he read as I did the rest. <BR> <BR>I confess I tortured a baritone; <BR>The trouble he caused was uncondoned; <BR>A third higher I played; <BR>As he became plagued; <BR>As the high notes <BR>were more of a groan. <BR> <BR>Much more I could write of my journey; <BR>A church organist is out of the ordinary; <BR>The pay's very poor; <BR>the dedication must be Pure; <BR>And our music is all to HIS Glory. <BR> <BR>(2002) <BR> <BR>Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_30.2a62f4d3.2a734187_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: trashy organ music? From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 20:22:01 EDT     --part1_1bf.8d628fe.2a7341a9_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/25/02 10:59:01 PM Central Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:     > I remember the old story about a young woman meeting Ellen Jane at a = party. > When they were introduced the young woman said, "Oh, Miss Lorenz, I've = used > your music for years." > EJ replied: "Well dear, I hope you won't hold it against me." > >   As she laughed all the way to the bank. lol. Lee   --part1_1bf.8d628fe.2a7341a9_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 7/25/02 10:59:01 PM Central Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">I remember the old = story about a young woman meeting Ellen Jane at a party. &nbsp; <BR>When they were introduced the young woman said, "Oh, Miss Lorenz, I've = used <BR>your music for years." <BR>EJ replied: &nbsp;"Well dear, I hope you won't hold it against me." <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>As she laughed all the way to the bank. &nbsp;lol. = &nbsp;Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1bf.8d628fe.2a7341a9_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Flutes are us From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 20:01:24 -0500   lab wrote: > > Hi. > > Anyone know exactly what is a Flute a Fuseau? Is it a Koppelflute? > How is it constructed?   A Flute a Fuseau is basically the same as the Spillflote or Spindle Flute. This is generally a slightly narrower scaled version of the Koppelflote. It consists, like the Koppelflute, of a parallel body surmounted by a tapered cap, open at the top. > > And what about a Flauto Mirabilis? Is it similar to a Doppel Flute?   The Flauto Mirabilis was developed by Ernest M. Skinner in the 1920's as a very strong orchestral flute. Unlike the Doppelflote it only has a single mouth. They are generally placed on the Solo division on fairly high pressure wind.   John Speller > > Thanks. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Flutes are us From: "jon bertschinger" <jonberts@magiccablepc.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 20:31:15 -0500   to add a little more about Koppalfl=F6te...the cap is usually only about 1/5 to 1/4 the body length, whereas a Spillfl=F6te usually has a cap about 1/3 the body length. =20   just my two cents on the issue.   jon bertschinger  
(back) Subject: Re: trashy organ music? From: "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 27 Jul 2002 02:36:05 +0000   <html><div style=3D'background-color:'><DIV> <P>One man's&nbsp; trash&nbsp; is&nbsp; another man's&nbsp; = treasure.<BR><BR></P></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>----Original Message Follows---- <DIV></DIV>From: straight <STRAIGHT@INFOBLVD.NET> <DIV></DIV>Reply-To: "PipeChat" <PIPECHAT@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>To: PipeChat <PIPECHAT@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>Subject: Re: trashy organ music? <DIV></DIV>Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 00:31:29 -0400 <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>That sounds more like light conversation than a <DIV></DIV>serious statement. <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>Diane S. <DIV></DIV>&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;= &lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt= ;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&l= t;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt; <DIV></DIV>I remember the old story about a young woman <DIV></DIV>meeting Ellen Jane at a <DIV></DIV>party. <DIV></DIV>When they were introduced the young woman said, <DIV></DIV>"Oh, Miss Lorenz, <DIV></DIV>I've used <DIV></DIV>your music for years." <DIV></DIV>EJ replied: "Well dear, I hope you won't hold it <DIV></DIV>against me." <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" <DIV></DIV>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs &amp; = related topics <DIV></DIV>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV></div><br clear=3Dall><hr>Chat with friends online, try MSN = Messenger: <a href=3D'http://g.msn.com/1HM1ENUS/c144??PS=3D47575'>Click = Here</a><br></html>