PipeChat Digest #2884 - Wednesday, June 5, 2002
 
The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music
  by "Bruce R. Schutrum" <bschutrum@neo.rr.com>
Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music
  by "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com>
Re: NZAO Congress
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: NZAO Congress
  by <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov>
RE: Solemnity of Corpus Christi (X-posted)
  by "bruce dersch" <bedersch@earthlink.net>
Re: NZAO Congress - Temperament
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Burning Organists
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
RE: Burning Organists
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Dennis James' FILMHARMONIA at LACMA June 22 / Los Angeles Debut
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jun 2002 07:34:45 -0500   I have been sorting and arranging my CDs, forced into this duty by the burgeoning collection with nowhere to put them. I have found a neat little hiding spot that holds about 200-250 CDs perfectly, and now have almost all my organ, choral, opera and other classical music together. The hard rock, jazz and miscellaneous are in other areas of the house. This saves several hundred dollars for the CD cabinet I was going to buy.   I woke up this morning thinking about asking Rick to help me learn to burn a CD of my favorite pop/rock music. I instantly, without thinking, came up with three "must have" selections thereon from my collection downstairs: "What I like about you" by the Romantics, "Moondance" by Van Morrison, and "Rocky Mountain Way" by Joe Walsh (Stevie Ray Vaughan fits in there somewhere, but it would be so hard to choose just one). Then I started thinking - what about organ music?   I have not thought this through, so have no idea what would go on mine except for the first track - instantly Vierne's Finale from Symphony 1 came to mind. But I have to rummage to see how many recorded versions I have and choose one.   So, your mission, should you choose to accept it: if you could burn or buy a CD with your favorite organ music (already recorded) totaling 70 minutes or less, what would you choose? This helps me in deciding what new CDs I must own if you rhapsodize over one or more.     Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music From: "Bruce R. Schutrum" <bschutrum@neo.rr.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jun 2002 09:23:26 -0400   on 6/4/02 8:34 AM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote:   > I have been sorting and arranging my CDs, forced into this duty by the > burgeoning collection with nowhere to put them. I have found a neat > little hiding spot that holds about 200-250 CDs perfectly, and now have > almost all my organ, choral, opera and other classical music together. > The hard rock, jazz and miscellaneous are in other areas of the house. > This saves several hundred dollars for the CD cabinet I was going to > buy. > > I woke up this morning thinking about asking Rick to help me learn to > burn a CD of my favorite pop/rock music. I instantly, without thinking, > came up with three "must have" selections thereon from my collection > downstairs: "What I like about you" by the Romantics, "Moondance" by > Van Morrison, and "Rocky Mountain Way" by Joe Walsh (Stevie Ray Vaughan > fits in there somewhere, but it would be so hard to choose just one). > Then I started thinking - what about organ music? > > I have not thought this through, so have no idea what would go on mine > except for the first track - instantly Vierne's Finale from Symphony 1 > came to mind. But I have to rummage to see how many recorded versions I > have and choose one. > > So, your mission, should you choose to accept it: if you could burn or > buy a CD with your favorite organ music (already recorded) totaling 70 > minutes or less, what would you choose? This helps me in deciding what > new CDs I must own if you rhapsodize over one or more. > > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music From: "David Carter" <david_n_carter@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jun 2002 15:50:47 +0000   My list would include: Bach: "Little" fugue in g Passacaglia & Fugue in c In dir ist freude Organ arr. of Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring Wachet auf Bach-Vivaldi concerto in a Gigout: Grand choeur dialogue Almost any organ & trumpet piece to fill out the disc   David Carter In sunny & quite warm (well OK, HOT) Sacramento           _________________________________________________________________ Join the world=92s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail. http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: NZAO Congress From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Tue, 04 Jun 2002 10:24:53 -0700       Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > >. > John Wells, by the way, has been recording Bach's entire 48 on the organ = and > his lecture about this was, as always with him, both very instructive, = easy > to listen to, and of great musical interest.   I have John Wells first CD of the Well-Tempered done on the Letourneau at St. Paul's Collegiate School in Hamilton, New Zealand. I am quite puzzled by a statement in the Program Notes. A quotation follows:   "Secondly, as a proponent of equal temperament, Bach was keen . . . ."   Since in is now widely understood and accepted that equal temperament and well-tempered are NOT the same thing and that Bach was using the term in = the sense of well-tempered, why would a scholar write this?   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Re: NZAO Congress From: <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov> Date: Tue, 4 Jun 2002 11:03:35 -0700     Of course, it is true that Well Temperament and Equal Temperament are not the same BUT it is conceivable that Bach did indeed craft these works for Equal Temperament as we know it today (NOT tuned by a machine, however!!). It has never been entirely proven that he meant Well Temperament (other than in the title).   Now, having said that, I personally believe he did intend these to utilize a form of Well Temperament system but that is my belief based on what I know of the tuning practices of that time period and region. Of course, Equal Temperament was known at that time, although widely seen as an unnecessary extreme. It must also be remembered that one generation = later, Georg Andreas Sorge advocated Equal Temperament and was widely criticized for it. But remember: Bach was into the scientific aspect of music and belonged to "The Mizler Society" as the 14th member and Sorge was admitted as the 15th member.     = Del Case = <dcase@puc.edu To: PipeChat = <pipechat@pipechat.org> > cc: = Sent by: Subject: Re: NZAO Congress = <pipechat@pipe = chat.org> = = = 06/04/2002 = 10:24 AM = Please respond = to "PipeChat" = = =             Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > >. > John Wells, by the way, has been recording Bach's entire 48 on the organ and > his lecture about this was, as always with him, both very instructive, easy > to listen to, and of great musical interest.   I have John Wells first CD of the Well-Tempered done on the Letourneau at St. Paul's Collegiate School in Hamilton, New Zealand. I am quite puzzled by a statement in the Program Notes. A quotation follows:   "Secondly, as a proponent of equal temperament, Bach was keen . . . = ."   Since in is now widely understood and accepted that equal temperament and well-tempered are NOT the same thing and that Bach was using the term in the sense of well-tempered, why would a scholar write this?   Del W. Case Pacific Union College   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: RE: Solemnity of Corpus Christi (X-posted) From: "bruce dersch" <bedersch@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jun 2002 11:39:39 -0700     Subject: RE: Solemnity of Corpus Christi (X-posted) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 3 Jun 2002 11:47:41 -0400   Dear Bud:   Have you ever heard of a hymn (in the loose sense of the term) called = "Clear vault of heaven"?   I managed to snag a copy of the music and would be glad to send a = photocopy to you if you are interested (or even curious).   Paul Emmons     Sorry to respond to the whole list on this, but the digest I get does not = have Paul's email.   I would love to see a copy of this if you could send it to me at = bedersch@yahoo.com. Thanks in advance   Bruce E. Dersch    
(back) Subject: Re: NZAO Congress - Temperament From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Tue, 04 Jun 2002 14:17:25 -0700   T   Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov wrote: > > Of course, it is true that Well Temperament and Equal Temperament are = not > the same BUT it is conceivable that Bach did indeed craft these works = for > Equal Temperament as we know it today (NOT tuned by a machine, = however!!). > It has never been entirely proven that he meant Well Temperament (other > than in the title). > > Now, having said that, I personally believe he did intend these to = utilize > a form of Well Temperament system but that is my belief based on what I > know of the tuning practices of that time period and region. Of course, > Equal Temperament was known at that time, although widely seen as an > unnecessary extreme. It must also be remembered that one generation = later, > Georg Andreas Sorge advocated Equal Temperament and was widely = criticized > for it. But remember: Bach was into the scientific aspect of music and > belonged to "The Mizler Society" as the 14th member and Sorge was = admitted > as the 15th member. >   Thanks for your response, particularly your use of the word "conceivable." I was reporting what is now widely believed based on a preponderance of the available information, though absolute proof may not be in hand.   Having said that, there is information about some use of equal tuning as early as the 1600s. And there was considerable debate about equal vs unequal lasting into the 1800s. Apparently there were organs in the UK that were not put into equal temperament until the last half of the 1800s.   My main concern is that there are still some, perhaps many, who are not aware that well-tempered and equally tempered are not synonyms. It has been interesting, as a teacher of music history, to see the changes in textbooks on this item over the last few years.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Burning Organists From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Wed, 5 Jun 2002 02:57:48 +0100   Hello,   I think that 70 mins just about constitutes a recital programme plus an = encore.....so let me select a suitable programme for a satisfying disc = which I could drag around with me in the auto.   Of course, burning your own CD opens up all sorts of = possibilities......old LP's could be included; so here goes.   1. Introduction & Passacaglia Reger/Hurford at Regensberger Dom (A startling opening item to grab my attention)   2. Trio Sonata in C minor - Bach/M.Claire-Alain (Something to bounce along with)   3. Scherzo (Giga) - Bossi/Fox/Riverside (Those nimble fingers just rattle along)   4. Fugue no.2 on BACH Schumann/Finotti/Zurich Metzler (Just utterly mind-blowing)   5. Chorale "O mensch bewein" Bach/DAT tape of myself (I know how to weep to this one!)   6. Bach before the mast. George Malcolm. Has anyone ever recorded this.....if not, why not?)   7. A Trumpet Menuet - Hollins/Liddle/Hull City Hall (Played on the organ it was written for)   8. Prelude & Fugue in E minor (Wedge) Ton Koopman anywhere   9. Preludium Kodaly/Piet Kee/Haarlem (So little know, but what a superb short piece and the best = organ in the world)   10. Toccata Suite Opus 5 - Durufle/Jane Parker-Smith/Blackburn = Cathedral (The best NEW organ in the UK)   Encore   11. Perpetuem Mobile Middelschulte/Fox/Riverside (Just when you thought you had a pedal technique!)   If there was just a tad of disc left, I would ask my friend Philip = Tordoff (Halifax Parish Church) to play his own Trumpet Tune into my DAT = recorder.....one of the finest Trumpet Tunes ever written, but not = published.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK -----Original Message----- Glenda wrote:-     I have been sorting and arranging my CDs etc........  
(back) Subject: RE: Burning Organists From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jun 2002 21:02:29 -0500   Thanks, Colin - that's the kind of reply post I had in mind!   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk     I think that 70 mins just about constitutes a recital programme plus an encore.....so let me select a suitable programme for a satisfying disc which I could drag around with me in the auto.   1. Introduction & Passacaglia Reger/Hurford at Regensberger Dom (A startling opening item to grab my attention)   2. Trio Sonata in C minor - Bach/M.Claire-Alain (Something to bounce along with)   3. Scherzo (Giga) - Bossi/Fox/Riverside (Those nimble fingers just rattle along)   4. Fugue no.2 on BACH Schumann/Finotti/Zurich Metzler (Just utterly mind-blowing)   5. Chorale "O mensch bewein" Bach/DAT tape of myself (I know how to weep to this one!)   6. Bach before the mast. George Malcolm. Has anyone ever recorded this.....if not, why not?)   7. A Trumpet Menuet - Hollins/Liddle/Hull City Hall (Played on the organ it was written for)   8. Prelude & Fugue in E minor (Wedge) Ton Koopman anywhere   9. Preludium Kodaly/Piet Kee/Haarlem (So little know, but what a superb short piece and the best organ in the world)   10. Toccata Suite Opus 5 - Durufle/Jane Parker-Smith/Blackburn Cathedral (The best NEW organ in the UK)   Encore   11. Perpetuem Mobile Middelschulte/Fox/Riverside (Just when you thought you had a pedal technique!)          
(back) Subject: Re: The burning of a CD of your favorite organ music From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jun 2002 09:36:34 -0400     On Tue, 4 Jun 2002 07:34:45 -0500 "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> writes: <snip> I have not thought this through, so have no idea what would go on mine except for the first track - instantly Vierne's Finale from Symphony 1 came to mind. But I have to rummage to see how many recorded versions I have and choose one. <snip>     Felix's "Railroad" version gets my vote !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   ________________________________________________________________ GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO! Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less! Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.  
(back) Subject: Dennis James' FILMHARMONIA at LACMA June 22 / Los Angeles Debut From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jun 2002 23:30:05 EDT     --part1_175.94c37cc.2a2edfbd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I would like to invite you all to attend the Los Angeles area debut of my internationally touring silent film ensemble Filmharmonia at our = performance to "Man With a Movie Camera" at Los Angeles County Museum of Art on = Saturday, June 22 starting at 7:30 p.m. The program is part of Film Department director Ian Birnie's "Double Exposure: Photography + Film" series (http://lacma.org).   Below are some introductory notes about FILMHARMONIA. At the June performance we will perform our critically acclaimed score to the classic 1928 Russian film that was derived from the original accompaniment notes = left by director Dziga Vertov himself. The discovery of these notes was a = major achievement in film scholarship, first written about by University of = Chicago Professor Yuri Tsivian. I was one of a handful of worldwide musicians commissioned to realize this intended score when the notes were uncovered = in the mid-1990s. The Filmharmonia quartet rendition, commissioned by Berkeley's Pacific Film Archive, is the only one realized in the = traditional historical recreation manner utilizing the authentic period-music as stipulated by its director. The source music was selected from published sets of Soviet film cue music obtained from Moscow enabling Filmharmonia's =   modern-day screenings of the film in its authentic episodic presentation manner unseen since its initial exhibitions.   FILMHARMONIA's Man With a Movie Camera - University of Chicago - 1999 " . . one of the must-see events of the Chicago movie year" Roger Ebert in the Chicago Sun-Times   Filmharmonia performs historically based traditional musical = accompaniments to classic silent films. The ensemble was founded by Dennis James to showcase unusual musical instruments in musical scoring recapturing the silent film era's sounds and musical styles in performances that are both culturally authentic and entertaining. Participating instrumentalists are =   selected for each performance from an association of professional = freelance musicians based in Southern California.   Featured instruments together with the traditional acoustic piano (or = theatre organ) and cello, are the theremin, Stroh phonoviolin, Marxophone, = autoharp, flexatone and various acoustic sound effects in use during the 1920's. = The ensemble collaborates with archives from around the world to present exquisitely beautiful prints of some of the century's greatest films to create multimedia experiences that revive silent films' extraordinary vitality and excitement.   ----------   FILMHARMONIA Silent Film Performance Sites   Louvre Museum, Paris, France National Film Theatre, London, England Palazzo Delle Espisozioni, Rome, Italy Uptown Theatre, Calgary, Canada Esplanade Concert Hall, Singapore National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Copley Symphony Hall, San Diego, California Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, California Castro Theatre, San Francisco, California Stanford Theatre, Palo Alto, California Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, Washington Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota Rockefeller Chapel, University of Chicago, Illinois Max Palevsky Cinema, University of Chicago, Illinois Madison Civic Center, Madison, Wisconsin Wexner Center for the Contemporary Arts, Columbus, Ohio Cleveland Art Museum, Cleveland, Ohio High Museum, Atlanta, Georgia Festival of World Cinema, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania     MEMBERS INCLUDE: Dennis James (Founder): Piano, organ, theremin, cristal = d' Baschet and sound effects Amy Crocker: Cello, cristal d' Baschet and sound effects Robert Korda: Stroh phonoviolin and sound effects Robert Stevenson: Percussion and sound effects Polly A. Sveda: Electronic instruments and sound effects   Production cotact: Silent Film Concerts 3707 Fifth Avenue, #412 San Diego, California 92103 619-234-1396 / muscur@aol.com   --part1_175.94c37cc.2a2edfbd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">I would like to invite you all to attend the Los = Angeles area debut of my internationally touring silent film ensemble = Filmharmonia at our performance to "Man With a Movie Camera" at Los = Angeles County Museum of Art on Saturday, June 22 starting at 7:30 = p.m.&nbsp; The program is part of Film Department director Ian Birnie's = "Double Exposure: Photography + Film" series (http://lacma.org).&nbsp; = <BR> <BR> Below are some introductory notes about FILMHARMONIA.&nbsp; At the June = performance we will perform our critically acclaimed score to the classic = 1928 Russian film that was derived from the original accompaniment notes = left by director Dziga Vertov himself.&nbsp; The discovery of these notes = was a major achievement in film scholarship, first written about by = University of Chicago Professor Yuri Tsivian.&nbsp; I was one of a handful = of worldwide musicians commissioned to realize this intended score when = the notes were uncovered in the mid-1990s.&nbsp; The Filmharmonia quartet = rendition, commissioned by Berkeley's Pacific Film Archive, is the only = one realized in the traditional historical recreation manner utilizing the = authentic period-music as stipulated by its director.&nbsp; The source = music was selected from published sets of Soviet film cue music obtained = from Moscow enabling Filmharmonia's modern-day screenings of the film in = its authentic episodic presentation manner unseen sinc <BR> FILMHARMONIA's Man With a Movie Camera - University of Chicago - 1999<BR> " .&nbsp; . one of the must-see events of the Chicago movie year"<BR> Roger Ebert in the Chicago Sun-Times<BR> <BR> Filmharmonia performs historically based traditional musical = accompaniments to classic silent films.&nbsp; The ensemble was founded by = Dennis James to showcase unusual musical instruments in musical scoring = recapturing the silent film era's sounds and musical styles in = performances that are both culturally authentic and entertaining.&nbsp; = Participating instrumentalists are selected for each performance from an = association of professional freelance musicians based in Southern = California.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> Featured instruments together with the traditional acoustic piano (or = theatre organ) and cello, are the theremin, Stroh phonoviolin, Marxophone, = autoharp, flexatone and various acoustic sound effects in use during the = 1920's.&nbsp; The ensemble collaborates with archives from around the = world to present exquisitely beautiful prints of some of the century's = greatest films to create multimedia experiences that revive silent films' = extraordinary vitality and excitement.<BR> <BR> ----------<BR> <BR> FILMHARMONIA<BR> Silent Film Performance Sites<BR> <BR> Louvre Museum, Paris, France<BR> National Film Theatre, London, England<BR> Palazzo Delle Espisozioni, Rome, Italy<BR> Uptown Theatre, Calgary, Canada<BR> Esplanade Concert Hall, Singapore<BR> National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.<BR> Copley Symphony Hall, San Diego, California<BR> Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, California<BR> Castro Theatre, San Francisco, California<BR> Stanford Theatre, Palo Alto, California<BR> Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, Washington<BR> Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington<BR> Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR> Rockefeller Chapel, University of Chicago, Illinois<BR> Max Palevsky Cinema, University of Chicago, Illinois<BR> Madison Civic Center, Madison, Wisconsin<BR> Wexner Center for the Contemporary Arts, Columbus, Ohio<BR> Cleveland Art Museum, Cleveland, Ohio<BR> High Museum, Atlanta, Georgia<BR> Festival of World Cinema, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania<BR> <BR> <BR> MEMBERS INCLUDE: Dennis James (Founder): Piano, organ, theremin, cristal = d' Baschet and sound effects<BR> Amy Crocker: Cello, cristal d' Baschet and sound effects<BR> Robert Korda: Stroh phonoviolin and sound effects<BR> Robert Stevenson: Percussion and sound effects<BR> Polly A. Sveda: Electronic instruments and sound effects<BR> <BR> Production cotact:<BR> Silent Film Concerts<BR> 3707 Fifth Avenue, #412<BR> San Diego, California&nbsp; 92103<BR> 619-234-1396 / muscur@aol.com</FONT></HTML>   --part1_175.94c37cc.2a2edfbd_boundary--