PipeChat Digest #2899 - Wednesday, June 12, 2002
 
Re: Service of the Word
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Back Home Again in NYC
  by "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Covenant Church
  by "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
Re: Back Home Again in NYC
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Covenant Church
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
DENNIS JAMES - 2002 SUMMER SILENTS AT THE STANFORD
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
DENNIS JAMES - 2002 SUMMER SILENTS AT THE STANFORD
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: More  thoughts on organ tone
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Service of the Word From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 12:25:23 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3106729523_2691510 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 6/12/02 11:59 AM, "DrB88@aol.com" <DrB88@aol.com> wrote:   > Alan........ > Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I'm not sure if I can totally answer = y=3D our > question. I would prefer, as would our pastor, that both of our Sunday > morning services be Eucharistic. However, there are many factors, both > practical and liturgical, that have kept us alternating. Our current = sch=3D edule > offers Eucharist for one of the two services each Sunday...and we = alterna=3D te > Communion with Morning Prayer or the Service of the Word. In an effort = t=3D o > come closer to all Eucharistic services, we schedule Holy Communion in = bo=3D th > services on all Festival Sundays, and also when there is a fifth Sunday = i=3D n the > month. >=3D20 > That=3DB9s pretty much exactly the way I did things when I made the same > improvements in parish schedules. It dawns on me that one of the = Pfattei=3D cher > books will surely discuss the =3DB3rationale=3DB2 of developing the = Service of th=3D e > Word. I=3DB9ll take a look. >=3D20 > This schedule was put in place before I came to the church, and my > understanding was/is that the use of Service of the Word as an alternate = =3D to > Holy Communion was somewhat of a means of answering the "contemporary" > issue...which is not big in our congregation, thankfully. >=3D20 > Ah, yes; of course. That hadn=3DB9t even dawned on me, but you=3DB9re = right. An=3D d our > taste seems to be quite similar, if not identical. >=3D20 > We do other types of services at other times...Taize, Jazz Vespers, etc. = =3D to > bring variety to our expressions of worship as well. >=3D20 > One fear in banishing the non-communion liturgies (Morning Prayer in > particular) is that our people would lose touch with those worship = struct=3D ures > also, and their corresponding canticles, etc. >=3D20 > You=3DB9re quite right, and I share your concern with that TOO. >=3D20 > We have a monthly Evening Prayer service at which we perform a Bach = Canta=3D ta > with orchestra--a series that has been alive and well in our parish for = o=3D ver > 31 years now. =3D20 >=3D20 > Oh, my goodness! That=3DB9s astonishing! How wonderful! May I ask = which pa=3D rish > this IS? >=3D20 > So the interest in continuing Morning Prayer as an alternate to Holy = Comm=3D union > is at least partly liturgical. >=3D20 > Primarily, I value With One Voice as a hymn supplement. Having spent = sev=3D eral > years in the Episcopal Church prior to this post, I miss the 1982 Hymnal > greatly...and can identify with the individuals who wrote recently = decryi=3D ng > the sometimes odd and outlandish harmonizations in the LBW. But I have = a=3D lso > come to love the German Chorales which I didn't really know or = understand=3D all > that well previously. >=3D20 > Oh, well! I=3DB9m certainly glad that we had THAT to offer you. = It=3DB9s the be=3D st > gift we can share, with ANYone. >=3D20 > And, last but not least, we are blessed with an 81-rank Berghaus organ = in=3D a > beautiful space with excellent acoustics. >=3D20 > Oh, my LAND! Eighty-one ranks in a parish church? THIS is a KNOCK-OUT. = =3D I=3DB9m > in awe. Is there a website where I can look at this wonderful thing? = (O=3D urs > is www.stlukesnyc.org I invite you to visit! >=3D20 > Alan (friend of your fellow-Chicagoan John Scherer, organist, Fourth > Presbyterian, who USED to be OUR organist) >=3D20     --B_3106729523_2691510 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Service of the Word</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 6/12/02 11:59 AM, = &quot;DrB88@aol.com&quot;=3D &lt;DrB88@aol.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Alan........<BR> Thanks for your thoughtful reply. &nbsp;I'm not sure if I can totally = answe=3D r your question. &nbsp;I would prefer, as would our pastor, that both of our=3D Sunday morning services be Eucharistic. &nbsp;However, there are many = facto=3D rs, both practical and liturgical, that have kept us alternating. = &nbsp;Our =3D current schedule offers Eucharist for one of the two services each = Sunday...=3D and we alternate Communion with Morning Prayer or the Service of the Word. = &=3D nbsp;In an effort to come closer to all Eucharistic services, we schedule = Ho=3D ly Communion in both services on all Festival Sundays, and also when there = i=3D s a fifth Sunday in the month.<BR> <BR> <I>That&#8217;s pretty much exactly the way I did things when I made the = sa=3D me improvements in parish schedules. &nbsp;It dawns on me that one of the = Pf=3D atteicher books will surely discuss the &#8220;rationale&#8221; of = developin=3D g the Service of the Word. &nbsp;I&#8217;ll take a look.<BR> </I><BR> This schedule was put in place before I came to the church, and my = understa=3D nding was/is that the use of Service of the Word as an alternate to Holy = Com=3D munion was somewhat of a means of answering the &quot;contemporary&quot; = iss=3D ue...which is not big in our congregation, thankfully. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> <I>Ah, yes; of course. &nbsp;That hadn&#8217;t even dawned on me, but = you&#=3D 8217;re right. &nbsp;And our taste seems to be quite similar, if not = identic=3D al.<BR> </I><BR> We do other types of services at other times...Taize, Jazz Vespers, etc. = to=3D bring variety to our expressions of worship as well. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> One fear in banishing the non-communion liturgies (Morning Prayer in = partic=3D ular) is that our people would lose touch with those worship structures = also=3D , and their corresponding canticles, etc. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> <I>You&#8217;re quite right, and I share your concern with that TOO.<BR> </I><BR> We have a monthly Evening Prayer service at which we perform a Bach = Cantata=3D with orchestra--a series that has been alive and well in our parish for = ove=3D r 31 years now. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> <I>Oh, my goodness! &nbsp;That&#8217;s astonishing! &nbsp;How wonderful! = &n=3D bsp;May I ask which parish this IS?<BR> </I><BR> So the interest in continuing Morning Prayer as an alternate to Holy = Commun=3D ion is at least partly liturgical. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Primarily, I value With One Voice as a hymn supplement. &nbsp;Having spent = =3D several years in the Episcopal Church prior to this post, I miss the 1982 = Hy=3D mnal greatly...and can identify with the individuals who wrote recently = decr=3D ying the sometimes odd and outlandish harmonizations in the LBW. &nbsp;But = I=3D have also come to love the German Chorales which I didn't really know or = un=3D derstand all that well previously.<BR> <BR> <I>Oh, well! &nbsp;I&#8217;m certainly glad that we had THAT to offer you. = =3D &nbsp;It&#8217;s the best gift we can share, with ANYone. &nbsp;<BR> </I><BR> And, last but not least, we are blessed with an 81-rank Berghaus organ in = a=3D beautiful space with excellent acoustics. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> <I>Oh, my LAND! &nbsp;Eighty-one ranks in a parish church? &nbsp;THIS is a = =3D KNOCK-OUT. &nbsp;I&#8217;m in awe. &nbsp;Is there a website where I can = look=3D at this wonderful thing? &nbsp;(Ours is www.stlukesnyc.org = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs=3D p;I invite you to visit!<BR> <BR> Alan (friend of your fellow-Chicagoan John Scherer, organist, Fourth = Presby=3D terian, who USED to be OUR organist)<BR> </I><BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3106729523_2691510--    
(back) Subject: Back Home Again in NYC From: "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 09:57:22 -0700 (PDT)   Hi, List!   I returned late last evening to New York City from my sojourn to the British Isles. I was back at my desk at 8:30 this morning, and have been working to catch up on everything I've missed.   I am working on a 'travelogue' of sorts that I will post in installments as I have time, assuming anyone is interested! Suffice it to say that the organs I was able to play on were as wonderful as they were different from each other; and my hosts and hostesses were fantastic. And yes, I did eat a haggis in Scotland, and drank something called a Purple Nasty. The rest is commentary.   Ta ta for now--   Jon NYC   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Covenant Church From: "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 12:22:27 -0500   I was brought up as a preacher's kid in this denomination (see discussion below). My parents were downplaying the = Swedish heritage by the 1950s. Somewhere along the line it became The Mission Covenant Church and finally The Evangelical Covenant Church. Chicago is = its headquarters, North Park is now a University, and the hospital is still known as Swedish Covenant Hospital (prominently mentioned as a sponsor during traffic and weather updates on Chicago's local NPR station, WBEZ).   To bring this closer to our "mission" as organists on this list, I commend their new hymnal that came out c. 1996: The Covenant Hymnal: A Worship Book. They really did an exemplary job of including great hymns from the past and present. I'm impressed. It = certainly should have a usefulness far beyond the denomination itself. As a student at North Park, I hated the gospel hymnody that was so prevalent in those days some decades back and was very outspoken about it. More recently, I = get the feeling that as the happy-clappy folks were invading music programs in mainline churches big time, the Covenanters were gradually upgrading = their music and have been slow to swallow "contemporary" hook, line, and sinker. The denomination and I are probably closer together in our musical tastes = at this point than we have been for over 40 years.   Back when I was 20 years old and was Leo Sowerby's assistant, I played Sunday evening services at Edgewater = Covenant Church (I think) in Chicago to bring in a bit more cash. Therein lies a musical anomaly! Anyway, one well-known Covenanter attended that church = and drove me home occasionally: Warner Sallman, painter of Sallman's head of Christ.   Bob Lind reminiscing in the Chicago burbs         Noel Stoutenburg <mjolnir@ticnet.com> 06/11/2002 08:09 PM Please respond to PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Re: Lutheran Hymnals (was New Missouri Synod Hymnal)         I think the group to which Alan referred,   > Except in Sweden, where they formed the Swedish Mission Covenant Church.   has a counterpart in the organization I know to have been once styled in the U.S., as the "Swedish Covenant Church", the operator of North Park College, in Chicago. Though I'm not certain, the name of the organization may have been restyled in the interest of greater inclusiveness.   ns      
(back) Subject: Re: Back Home Again in NYC From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 13:18:20 -0400   On 6/12/02 12:57 PM, "Dr. Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> wrote:   > Hi, List! > > I returned late last evening to New York City from my sojourn to the > British Isles. I was back at my desk at 8:30 this morning, and have > been working to catch up on everything I've missed. > Welcome home, Jon. I look forward to your reports.   Alan        
(back) Subject: Re: Covenant Church From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 14:30:32 -0400   On 6/12/02 1:22 PM, "Robert Lind" <Robert_Lind@cch.com> wrote:   > I was brought up as a preacher's kid in this > denomination (see discussion below).   My goodness. The Warner Sallman punchline sure caught me off guard! = Don't like his work, but nevertheLESS!   You wouldn't happen to have known Wayne Johnson at North Park, I suppose? Year of birth perhaps 1930. He eventually became a Lutheran and then an Anglican; I knew in him NYC in the 70s and 80s.     Alan    
(back) Subject: DENNIS JAMES - 2002 SUMMER SILENTS AT THE STANFORD From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 14:30:46 EDT     --part1_9e.27b475b2.2a38ed56_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   It's that time again - 2002 Summer Silents on Wednesday evenings at the beautifully restored Stanford Theatre in downtown Palo Alto, California, = each accompanied by Dennis James at the Mighty WurliTzer.   June 26: INTOLERANCE (1916) D. W. Griffith's grand epic depicting intolerance through the ages is probably the most original and influential =   movie ever made. The film's structure, with four parallel stories, has = been compared to a Bach fugue. "It is charged with the visionary excitement = about the power of movies to combine music, dance, narrative, drama, painting, = and photography -- to do alone what all the other arts together had done." Pauline Kael   July 3: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE Safety Last (1923) Harold scales a skyscraper (and winds up dangling from a clock) to win = $1000. Safety Last has proven to be by far the most popular silent film at the Stanford Theatre. Thousands have seen it!   Why Worry (1923) Hypochondriac Harold seeks a rest cure in South America and ends up in a revolution.   July 10: THE SEA HAWK (1924) A young baronet is shanghaied and eventually becomes the feared pirate = known as the Sea Hawk.   July 24: LOVE (1927) Anna Karenina (Garbo) falls in love with Vronsky (Gilbert) and gives up = her husband and child. Based on Leo Tolstoy's novel.   July 31: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE The Kid Brother (1927) Cinderella story of the weakling kid brother in a boisterous all-male = family.   The Freshman (1925) Harold does anything to be popular at college and accidentally becomes a football hero.   August 7: THE PRISONER OF ZENDA (1922) Ramon Novarro became a star with his portrayal of charming villain Rupert = of Hentzau in Rex Ingram's (Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse) silent version = of Anthony Hope's novel.   August 21: WAY DOWN EAST (1920) An innocent country girl is seduced then abandoned by a scoundrel in the city. After she loses her baby, she seeks refuge at a farm and falls in = love, but all seems lost when the scoundrel returns to reveal her past. Lillian Gish's performance and D.W. Griffith's cinematic genius turn this = Victorian melodrama into one of the most durable and entertaining films of the = entire silent period. The film ends with the famous rescues of Lillian Gish from = the icy river.   August 28- HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE Speedy (1928) Harold tries to save NYC's last horse-drawn trolley, run by his = girlfriend's grandfather.   Hot Water (1924) Young husband Harold struggles with a turkey, a new car, and his obnoxious =   in-laws.   September 4: THE BELOVED ROGUE (1927) Barrymore plays roguish poet Francois Villon in this rousing silent film. This was Conrad Veidt's first American film (he went on to play Major Strasser in Casablanca).   First opened in June of 1925, nearly every important Hollywood picture = played the 1175 seat Stanford Theatre on its first release. In 1987 the Packard Foundation bought the theatre and restored it to its original condition. = It quickly became America's most popular classic movie house. More people saw =   Casablanca there on its 50th anniversary in 1992 than at any other theatre = in America. The non-profit Stanford Theatre Foundation is dedicated to the preservation and public exhibition of films from the golden age of = Hollywood. Dennis James has been performing silent films at the Stanford Theatre = since 1993.   221 University Ave, Palo Alto, California, Showtime 7:30 p.m. For information, call (650) 324-3700. Tickets for the double feature are $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors (65 =   and over), and $3.00 for young people under 18.   --part1_9e.27b475b2.2a38ed56_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">It's that time again - 2002 Summer Silents on = Wednesday evenings at the beautifully restored Stanford Theatre in downtown Palo Alto, California, each accompanied by Dennis James at = the Mighty WurliTzer.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> June 26:&nbsp; INTOLERANCE (1916) D. W. Griffith's grand epic depicting = intolerance through the ages is probably the most original and influential = movie ever made. The film's structure, with four parallel stories, has = been compared to a Bach fugue.&nbsp; "It is charged with the visionary = excitement about the power of movies to combine music, dance, narrative, = drama, painting, and photography -- to do alone what all the other arts = together had done." Pauline Kael <BR> <BR> July 3:&nbsp; HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> Safety Last (1923)<BR> Harold scales a skyscraper (and winds up dangling from a clock) to win = $1000. Safety Last has proven to be by far the most popular silent film at = the Stanford Theatre. Thousands have seen it!<BR> <BR> Why Worry (1923)<BR> Hypochondriac Harold seeks a rest cure in South America and ends up in a = revolution.<BR> <BR> July 10: THE SEA HAWK (1924)<BR> A young baronet is shanghaied and eventually becomes the feared pirate = known as the Sea Hawk.<BR> <BR> July 24: LOVE (1927)<BR> Anna Karenina (Garbo) falls in love with Vronsky (Gilbert) and gives up = her husband and child. <BR> Based on Leo Tolstoy's novel.<BR> <BR> July 31: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> The Kid Brother (1927)<BR> Cinderella story of the weakling kid brother in a boisterous all-male = family.<BR> <BR> The Freshman (1925)<BR> Harold does anything to be popular at college and accidentally becomes a = football hero.<BR> <BR> August 7: THE PRISONER OF ZENDA (1922)<BR> Ramon Novarro became a star with his portrayal of charming villain Rupert = of Hentzau in Rex Ingram's (Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse) silent = version of Anthony Hope's novel.<BR> <BR> August 21: WAY DOWN EAST (1920)<BR> An innocent country girl is seduced then abandoned by a scoundrel in the = city. After she loses her baby, she seeks refuge at a farm and falls in = love, but all seems lost when the scoundrel returns to reveal her past. = Lillian Gish's performance and D.W. Griffith's cinematic genius turn this = Victorian melodrama into one of the most durable and entertaining films of = the entire silent period. The film ends with the famous rescues of Lillian = Gish from the icy river.<BR> <BR> August 28- HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> Speedy (1928)<BR> Harold tries to save NYC's last horse-drawn trolley, run by his = girlfriend's grandfather.<BR> <BR> Hot Water (1924)<BR> Young husband Harold struggles with a turkey, a new car, and his obnoxious = in-laws.<BR> <BR> September 4: THE BELOVED ROGUE (1927)<BR> Barrymore plays roguish poet Francois Villon in this rousing silent film. = This was Conrad Veidt's first American film (he went on to play Major = Strasser in Casablanca).<BR> <BR> First opened in June of 1925, nearly every important Hollywood picture = played the 1175 seat Stanford Theatre on its first release. In 1987 the = Packard Foundation bought the theatre and restored it to its original = condition. It quickly became America's most popular classic movie house. = More people saw Casablanca there on its 50th anniversary in 1992 than at = any other theatre in America. The non-profit Stanford Theatre Foundation = is dedicated to the preservation and public exhibition of films from the = golden age of Hollywood.&nbsp; Dennis James has been performing silent = films at the Stanford Theatre since 1993.<BR> <BR> 221 University Ave, Palo Alto, California, Showtime 7:30 p.m.<BR> For information, call (650) 324-3700. <BR> Tickets for the double feature are $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors (65 = and over), and $3.00 for young people under 18.<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_9e.27b475b2.2a38ed56_boundary--  
(back) Subject: DENNIS JAMES - 2002 SUMMER SILENTS AT THE STANFORD From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 14:54:14 EDT     --part1_f7.1c917bfa.2a38f2d6_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   It's that time again - Summer Silents on Wednesday evenings at the beautifully restored Stanford Theatre in downtown Palo Alto, California = with each accompanied by Dennis James at the Mighty WurliTzer.   June 26: INTOLERANCE (1916) D. W. Griffith's grand epic depicting intolerance through the ages is probably the most original and influential =   movie ever made. The film's structure, with four parallel stories, has = been compared to a Bach fugue. "It is charged with the visionary excitement = about the power of movies to combine music, dance, narrative, drama, painting, = and photography -- to do alone what all the other arts together had done." Pauline Kael   July 3: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE Safety Last (1923) Harold scales a skyscraper (and winds up dangling from a clock) to win = $1000. Safety Last has proven to be by far the most popular silent film at the Stanford Theatre. Thousands have seen it!   Why Worry (1923) Hypochondriac Harold seeks a rest cure in South America and ends up in a revolution.   July 10: THE SEA HAWK (1924) A young baronet is shanghaied and eventually becomes the feared pirate = known as the Sea Hawk.   July 24: LOVE (1927) Anna Karenina (Garbo) falls in love with Vronsky (Gilbert) and gives up = her husband and child. Based on Leo Tolstoy's novel.   July 31: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE The Kid Brother (1927) Cinderella story of the weakling kid brother in a boisterous all-male = family.   The Freshman (1925) Harold does anything to be popular at college and accidentally becomes a football hero.   August 7: THE PRISONER OF ZENDA (1922) Ramon Novarro became a star with his portrayal of charming villain Rupert = of Hentzau in Rex Ingram's (Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse) silent version = of Anthony Hope's novel.   August 21: WAY DOWN EAST (1920) An innocent country girl is seduced then abandoned by a scoundrel in the city. After she loses her baby, she seeks refuge at a farm and falls in = love, but all seems lost when the scoundrel returns to reveal her past. Lillian Gish's performance and D.W. Griffith's cinematic genius turn this = Victorian melodrama into one of the most durable and entertaining films of the = entire silent period. The film ends with the famous rescues of Lillian Gish from = the icy river.   August 28- HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE Speedy (1928) Harold tries to save NYC's last horse-drawn trolley, run by his = girlfriend's grandfather.   Hot Water (1924) Young husband Harold struggles with a turkey, a new car, and his obnoxious =   in-laws.   September 4: THE BELOVED ROGUE (1927) Barrymore plays roguish poet Francois Villon in this rousing silent film. This was Conrad Veidt's first American film (he went on to play Major Strasser in Casablanca).   First opened in June of 1925, nearly every important Hollywood picture = played the 1175 seat Stanford Theatre on its first release. In 1987 the Packard Foundation bought the theatre and restored it to its original condition. = It quickly became America's most popular classic movie house. More people saw =   Casablanca there on its 50th anniversary in 1992 than at any other theatre = in America. The non-profit Stanford Theatre Foundation is dedicated to the preservation and public exhibition of films from the golden age of = Hollywood. Dennis James has been performing silent films at the theatre since 1993.   221 University Ave, Palo Alto, California, Showtime 7:30 p.m. For information, call (650) 324-3700. Tickets for the double feature are $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors (65 =   and over), and $3.00 for young people under 18.     --part1_f7.1c917bfa.2a38f2d6_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">It's that time again - Summer Silents on = Wednesday evenings at the beautifully restored Stanford Theatre in = downtown Palo Alto, California with each accompanied by Dennis James at the Mighty = WurliTzer.<BR> <BR> June 26:&nbsp; INTOLERANCE (1916) D. W. Griffith's grand epic depicting = intolerance through the ages is probably the most original and influential = movie ever made. The film's structure, with four parallel stories, has = been compared to a Bach fugue.&nbsp; "It is charged with the visionary = excitement about the power of movies to combine music, dance, narrative, = drama, painting, and photography -- to do alone what all the other arts = together had done." Pauline Kael <BR> <BR> July 3:&nbsp; HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> Safety Last (1923)<BR> Harold scales a skyscraper (and winds up dangling from a clock) to win = $1000. Safety Last has proven to be by far the most popular silent film at = the Stanford Theatre. Thousands have seen it!<BR> <BR> Why Worry (1923)<BR> Hypochondriac Harold seeks a rest cure in South America and ends up in a = revolution.<BR> <BR> July 10: THE SEA HAWK (1924)<BR> A young baronet is shanghaied and eventually becomes the feared pirate = known as the Sea Hawk.<BR> <BR> July 24: LOVE (1927)<BR> Anna Karenina (Garbo) falls in love with Vronsky (Gilbert) and gives up = her husband and child. Based on Leo Tolstoy's novel.<BR> <BR> July 31: HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> The Kid Brother (1927)<BR> Cinderella story of the weakling kid brother in a boisterous all-male = family.<BR> <BR> The Freshman (1925)<BR> Harold does anything to be popular at college and accidentally becomes a = football hero.<BR> <BR> August 7: THE PRISONER OF ZENDA (1922)<BR> Ramon Novarro became a star with his portrayal of charming villain Rupert = of Hentzau in Rex Ingram's (Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse) silent = version of Anthony Hope's novel.<BR> <BR> August 21: WAY DOWN EAST (1920)<BR> An innocent country girl is seduced then abandoned by a scoundrel in the = city. After she loses her baby, she seeks refuge at a farm and falls in = love, but all seems lost when the scoundrel returns to reveal her past. = Lillian Gish's performance and D.W. Griffith's cinematic genius turn this = Victorian melodrama into one of the most durable and entertaining films of = the entire silent period. The film ends with the famous rescues of Lillian = Gish from the icy river.<BR> <BR> August 28- HAROLD LLOYD DOUBLE FEATURE<BR> Speedy (1928)<BR> Harold tries to save NYC's last horse-drawn trolley, run by his = girlfriend's grandfather.<BR> <BR> Hot Water (1924)<BR> Young husband Harold struggles with a turkey, a new car, and his obnoxious = in-laws.<BR> <BR> September 4: THE BELOVED ROGUE (1927)<BR> Barrymore plays roguish poet Francois Villon in this rousing silent film. = This was Conrad Veidt's first American film (he went on to play Major = Strasser in Casablanca).<BR> <BR> First opened in June of 1925, nearly every important Hollywood picture = played the 1175 seat Stanford Theatre on its first release. In 1987 the = Packard Foundation bought the theatre and restored it to its original = condition. It quickly became America's most popular classic movie house. = More people saw Casablanca there on its 50th anniversary in 1992 than at = any other theatre in America. The non-profit Stanford Theatre Foundation = is dedicated to the preservation and public exhibition of films from the = golden age of Hollywood.&nbsp; Dennis James has been performing silent = films at the theatre since 1993.<BR> <BR> 221 University Ave, Palo Alto, California, Showtime 7:30 p.m.<BR> For information, call (650) 324-3700. <BR> Tickets for the double feature are $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors (65 = and over), and $3.00 for young people under 18.<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_f7.1c917bfa.2a38f2d6_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: More thoughts on organ tone From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@qwest.net> Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 12:19:27 -0700   >The one speaker per note idea was tried already by I believe AOB. >The cones were various lengths. Conn also. The best way to use >speakers is to put them behind swell shades if adding digital to >pipes. The swell box does a very nice job of mixing pipes and >digital together and they express at the same rate.   Actually, AOB's claim to fame was running several notes through speakers, = no more than 18 notes, usually only 12, and usually no more than 6 from the same stop. I have an AOB organ. It has about 10 ranks of generators = going off to 48 amplifiers and speakers.   The speakers are 8" diameter on 20" "sonotubes". Bass notes come through 12" diameter on 20" tubes, and one 15" for the 32' flue stop, mounted in a box the size of a small refrigerator.   It does give a very lifelike sound, as the sound of the organ comes from many sources -- just like pipes on the chect.   Dennis Goward