PipeChat Digest #2913 - Monday, June 17, 2002
 
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Correction to My Narrative!
  by "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com>
Re: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "r" <basset3@citlink.net>
No problem.... (dissing digital)
  by "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT  INTER
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE	IF NOT IN
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF NOT  IN
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
RE: Dr. Hall Tours the UK:  part one
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF	NOT INT
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: music list
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: music list
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETEIF	NOT  INT
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:37:41 +0100   At 10:16 16/06/02 +0100, you wrote:   >There is a whole new musical universe waiting to be discovered. We could >even give them colourful names such as "Starburst Mixture", "Cosmic = Flute" >"Phase Shift Shuffleflote", "Wow Wow Celeste", "Banshee Trompette" or >"Freak Shriek".....the latter for the Baroque enthusiasts! > >Send your ideas in an e-mail to Cheryl Hart!!   Gee, Colin, what have I done to deserve that? :-D   Cheryl with filters set to repel all onslaughts :-)      
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 09:01:03 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3107149263_43701_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   on 6/17/02 1:46 AM, Chicaleee@aol.com at Chicaleee@aol.com wrote:   "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new hymns in our church, and is even in our hymn book (the one with 666 hymns). We are = going to change to the Celebration Hymnal soon. Lee   Which hymnal has the magic number 666? Just curious. "Shine, Jesus, = Shine" is in the Lutheran hymnal supplement "With One Voice" and is a hit with = our congregation.   I like the Celebration Hymnal. We use it in a local tradition called "Sunday School Opening" held every Sunday in the church gym.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       --MS_Mac_OE_3107149263_43701_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Digital creativity</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> on 6/17/02 1:46 AM, Chicaleee@aol.com at Chicaleee@aol.com wrote:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2">&quot;Shine, Jesus, Shine&quot; is one of = the fa=3D vorites of the new hymns &nbsp;in our church, and is even in our hymn book = (=3D the one with 666 hymns). &nbsp;We are going to change to the Celebration = Hym=3D nal soon. &nbsp;Lee</FONT> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> Which hymnal has the magic number 666? &nbsp;Just curious. = &nbsp;&quot;Shin=3D e, Jesus, Shine&quot; is in the Lutheran hymnal supplement &quot;With One = Vo=3D ice&quot; and is a hit with our congregation. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> I like the Celebration Hymnal. &nbsp;We use it in a local tradition called = =3D &quot;Sunday School Opening&quot; held every Sunday in the church gym. = &nbsp=3D ;<BR> <BR> <BR> Randy Runyon<BR> Music Director<BR> Zion Lutheran Church<BR> Hamilton, Ohio<BR> runyonr@muohio.edu<BR> <BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3107149263_43701_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Correction to My Narrative! From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonathan@jonathanbhall.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 06:28:11 -0700 (PDT)   I must correct one small but vital detail. It was no mere lay-clerk who served me my first Purple Nasty; it was Simon himself! And he points out that, the enthusiastic endorsement I heard notwithstanding, it is not entirely illegal in England. There are just many pubs too sensible to sell it.   On my next trip I have been promised another Scottish culinary treat: a Mars bar, dipped in batter and deep-fried. Not even the fried-green-tomatoes cuisine of the American South has heard of that one, i'll bet...or has it??   :)   J   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:28:21 EDT   Dear Mr. Mitchell:   I like the Saint Mary Redcliffe instrument, as do many on this list. I = have no argument that for its type, it produces some remarkable effects. In light of the continuous and ongoing two thousand year history of = pipe organ building as a component of a multiplicity of cultures, could you = please clarify the following statement you made to the list: "For build quality, Harrison & Harrison have never been surpassed in = the UK or anywhere else in the world." That is quite an endorsement. Another interesting statement is the one before it, in which you state =   that the pipe organ in question is "admittedly dated in the same way that = a Skinner organ is now 'old fashioned'". A brief perusal of the past two decades of journals in the field would indicate that the pendulum has = swung, and Skinner instruments are fashionable enough again that several builders =   are claiming to be "the next Skinner."   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "r" <basset3@citlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:36:43 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0074_01C215EA.DF6405C0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new hymns in our =3D church   Now sing it 100 times over and over to please everyone -- then review =3D your opinion.   Robert Clooney   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0074_01C215EA.DF6405C0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4207.2601" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>"Shine, Jesus, Shine" = =3D is one of the=3D20 favorites of the new hymns &nbsp;in our church</FONT></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Now sing it 100 times over and over = to =3D please=3D20 everyone -- then review your opinion.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Robert =3D Clooney</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0074_01C215EA.DF6405C0--    
(back) Subject: No problem.... (dissing digital) From: "Wayne Grauel" <wayne@eminent-usa.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:55:23 -0400   Daniel, no problem... it is so easy to have one thought or conversation carry down through several emails like this.   I hope you aren't offended that I tend to shy away from "do-all organs" or took the post as a "dig" for organ style.   I think that this is a luxury that digital can easily provide, and heavens knows, the big "American Classic" pipe builders have always tried to pull this off. For many, the available spectrum of sound is an acceptable trade-off for true tonal accuracy. More often than not, these instruments tend to "lean" more away from the true sound of a large Germanic ensemble which is a sound all of it's own.   Without question, there is a definite appreciation when one hears a specific instrument based on a tonal concept, such as a big North German/Dutch organ or a large French Organ.   Each has it's own distinct character, they will both play the notes of all organ literature... but hearing as the music in the proper context of the "era" and as the composer envisioned is where each would fall short. There is no question that new organ at Oberlin is like a trip to France!   I just wanted to further clarify my reaction to the rest of your post, as I had come home late and was falling asleep at the keyboard, so I just wanted to make sure I was coherent in the intention of my response to that part.... (and the true point of why I even brought it up!) Wayne    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 11:24:03 -0400   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3107157843_559771_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   on 6/17/02 10:36 AM, r at basset3@citlink.net wrote:   "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new hymns in our church Now sing it 100 times over and over to please everyone -- then review your opinion. Robert Clooney     That is a test no hymn would pass.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       --MS_Mac_OE_3107157843_559771_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Digital creativity</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> on 6/17/02 10:36 AM, r at basset3@citlink.net wrote:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2">&quot;Shine, Jesus, Shine&quot; is one of = the fa=3D vorites of the new hymns &nbsp;in our church<BR> </FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Now sing it 100 times over and = over to pl=3D ease everyone -- then review your opinion.<BR> </FONT></FONT> <BR> <FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">Robert Clooney<BR> </FONT></FONT><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> That is a test no hymn would pass.<BR> <BR> <BR> Randy Runyon<BR> Music Director<BR> Zion Lutheran Church<BR> Hamilton, Ohio<BR> runyonr@muohio.edu<BR> <BR> </BODY> </HTML>     --MS_Mac_OE_3107157843_559771_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 08:43:31 -0700   Oh, I disagree, Randy ... we sing "Day By Day" to the tune "Sumner" in the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 as the Kneeling Hymn at the end of EVERY service, Mass OR Evensong, and have done so ever since I came to St. Matthew's five years ago ... and older Episcopalians remember singing it since 1940, at LEAST! (grin).   The Rector has tried to get rid of it on three different occasions, and run into a solid WALL of resistance from the congregation each time (chuckle).   There are others ... the Office Hymn for Trinitytide repeats from the first Sunday after Trinity until Advent (usually about six months), unless a Feast Day intervenes. It DOES have a "summer" and a "winter" TUNE, but that's still about three months of each, with the same TEXT throughout.   We sing most of the L.M. Office Hymns throughout the year to the Mechlin "Verbum supernum" tune from The English Hymnal, since until recently there was no CHOIR at Evensong.   I find in general that Gregorian hymn-tunes wear better than modern tunes.   Cheers,   Bud       Randolph Runyon wrote: > > on 6/17/02 10:36 AM, r at basset3@citlink.net wrote: > > "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new > hymns in our church > > Now sing it 100 times over and over to please everyone -- > then review your opinion. > > Robert Clooney > > That is a test no hymn would pass. > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 11:54:03 -0400   At 10:37 AM 6/17/2002 +0100, you wrote: >At 10:16 16/06/02 +0100, you wrote: > >>There is a whole new musical universe waiting to be discovered. We could =   >>even give them colourful names such as "Starburst Mixture", "Cosmic = Flute" >>"Phase Shift Shuffleflote", "Wow Wow Celeste", "Banshee Trompette" or >>"Freak Shriek".....the latter for the Baroque enthusiasts! >> >>Send your ideas in an e-mail to Cheryl Hart!! Hi list,   Heres one for stop-list creativity..   There was a pipe organ, somewhere in Canada, that had a prepared for stop, =   that was turned into a practical joke. It was stuck right at the bottom = of the jamb. It was engraved "Phart-a-phone". A year later the old organist =   called the builder up and asked what this stop sounded like. Poor old guy =   didn't realise that one could make a realistic version of this sound just by eating a load of beans, cabbage and onions, and waiting a little while.   As for creative sounds, I am not sure what more is needed. Any MIDI equipped organ can play the GS-MIDI library, with all the wierd sounds = that are in it. I have found that once the novelty wears off, most of these sounds are pretty much useless.   Regards,   Arie V.    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 11:51:31 -0400   I see the makings of a new thread here. I'll have to take a look at the tunes you mention. I cannot imagine singing the same hymn every service. That would drive me utterly bonkers. I would agree that Gregorian ones = wear better. They start out sounding eternal and tend to remain that way. One of the things I am happiest about in switching to a Lutheran church is not having to play the @#$%&*!!! Doxology every @#$%&*!!! Sunday.     on 6/17/02 11:43 AM, quilisma@socal.rr.com at quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Oh, I disagree, Randy ... we sing "Day By Day" to the tune "Sumner" in > the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 as the Kneeling Hymn at the end of EVERY > service, Mass OR Evensong, and have done so ever since I came to St. > Matthew's five years ago ... and older Episcopalians remember singing it > since 1940, at LEAST! (grin). > > The Rector has tried to get rid of it on three different occasions, and > run into a solid WALL of resistance from the congregation each time > (chuckle). > > There are others ... the Office Hymn for Trinitytide repeats from the > first Sunday after Trinity until Advent (usually about six months), > unless a Feast Day intervenes. It DOES have a "summer" and a "winter" > TUNE, but that's still about three months of each, with the same TEXT > throughout. > > We sing most of the L.M. Office Hymns throughout the year to the Mechlin > "Verbum supernum" tune from The English Hymnal, since until recently > there was no CHOIR at Evensong. > > I find in general that Gregorian hymn-tunes wear better than modern > tunes. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > Randolph Runyon wrote: >> >> on 6/17/02 10:36 AM, r at basset3@citlink.net wrote: >> >> "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new >> hymns in our church >> >> Now sing it 100 times over and over to please everyone -- >> then review your opinion. >> >> Robert Clooney >> >> That is a test no hymn would pass. >> >> Randy Runyon >> Music Director >> Zion Lutheran Church >> Hamilton, Ohio >> runyonr@muohio.edu    
(back) Subject: Re: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 19:09:45 +0300   Whilst not suggesting that Harrison and Harrison are better than all other builders over the history of the organ - "Father Willis" was in the same class, and others come to mind such as early J W Walker & sons, "Father Smith" , Cavaille Coll and some other North European builders - for = quality of construction and use of first class materials they may be equalled, but = I do not believe they have ever been bettered. Tonal quality is more subjective - they are the Rolls Royce to the Wurlitzer Cadillac and North European Porsche. John Foss  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 09:31:15 -0700       Randolph Runyon wrote: > > I see the makings of a new thread here. I'll have to take a look at the > tunes you mention. I cannot imagine singing the same hymn every = service. > That would drive me utterly bonkers. I would agree that Gregorian ones = wear > better. They start out sounding eternal and tend to remain that way. = One > of the things I am happiest about in switching to a Lutheran church is = not > having to play the @#$%&*!!! Doxology every @#$%&*!!! Sunday. >   My pet peeve at the moment is some of the service music ... the Willan Mass in particular (the Second Communion Service in the 1940) ... I find the Merbecke (the First Communion Service) MUCH less wearying. The Willan isn't BAD; it's just worn OUT, having been sung in this country since 1928 (!).   I have proposed that we switch to Missa Marialis (the Fourth Communion Service) for a year so they can LEARN it. We do it occasionally; they know the Kyrie.   OTOH, I am perfectly happy with the Scottish Chant Gloria in excelsis (#739), because they can sing it over the din of the bells on Christmas and Easter.   We DO change the Doxology seasonally:   Advent - All Things Come of Thee Christmas-Epiphanytide - Old 100th Septuagesima-Lent IV - All Things Come of Thee Passion Sunday-Maundy Thursday - nothing Easter Vigil-Pentecost - Vigiles et Sancti, with the alleluias Trinity Sunday-Advent - Old 100th   I WONDER just how necessary it is to keep the Doxology at all ... nobody complains when we don't sing ANYTHING in Passiontide. Most anglo-catholic churches don't do it at all.   We sing three hymns per Mass -- Processional, Communion, Recessional -- and one or two hymns per Evensong -- the Office Hymn, and a recessional on Feast Days ... that's a rota of about 200 hymns per year, since we use the old one-year Lectionary. We seldom sing a hymn more than once a year, except for "Day By Day" and the Office Hymns. Depending on which Feast Days fall on which Sundays, a few get left out and a few get added. We probably learn one or two totally new hymns a year. That's a fairly decent repertoire for a small congregation.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 11:38:57 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --Boundary_(ID_2ZZ4WLOb3jfQgXWPU1AKYg) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   On 6/17/02 8:01 AM, Randolph Runyon wrote:   > Which hymnal has the magic number 666? Just curious. "Shine, Jesus, = Shi=3D ne" > is in the Lutheran hymnal supplement "With One Voice" and is a hit with = o=3D ur > congregation. =3D20   In the new Canadian Anglican hymnal, Common Praise, hymn 666 is the = doxolog=3D y =3DAD so you can sing it every week!   Cheers, Russ   --Boundary_(ID_2ZZ4WLOb3jfQgXWPU1AKYg) Content-type: text/html; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Digital creativity</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">On 6/17/02 8:01 AM, Randolph Runyon wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica">Which hymnal has the magic = number 666? &nbsp;Just curious. &nbsp;&quot;Shine, Jesus, Shine&quot; is = in the Lutheran hymnal supplement &quot;With One Voice&quot; and is a hit = with our congregation. &nbsp;<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"Helvetica"><BR> In the new Canadian Anglican hymnal, Common Praise, hymn 666 is the = doxology &#8211; so you can sing it every week!<BR> <BR> Cheers,<BR> Russ</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --Boundary_(ID_2ZZ4WLOb3jfQgXWPU1AKYg)--  
(back) Subject: RE: Dr. Hall Tours the UK: part one From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 12:49:00 -0400   >sung by the boys only   Are you sure?   Last I heard, S. Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh took great pride in being one the (very few, IMHO) successful examples of combining boys and girls into = a single treble section. Has the cathedral abandoned the idea? Were the girls just off for the day? Or maybe they all wear short haircuts now.   Perhaps second thoughts have suggested themselves from experience. Even with Barry Rose, ca. 1995 he said that any differences in tone between = boys and girls were not detectable by cathedral organists, but only by their wives. But this year he says that girls have great difficulty pronouncing = a pure "oo" vowel-- it comes out as a kind of vague dipthong, and the reason is unknown but apparently physiological.      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 12:52:33 -0400   We probably learn one or two totally new hymns a year. That's a > fairly decent repertoire for a small congregation. > > Cheers, > > Bud   I count myself extremely fortunate: I'm permitted to introduce one new = hymn per Sunday!     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: music list From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:01:14 -0400   >It is interesting to me that the music of various denominations are so similar   In the Episcopal church, aggressive syncretism and eclecticism are practically official policy, doncha know. The priestess for whom one of = my friends works is determined to implement the express instructions of the bishop to use praise music from "Lift every voice and sing" and other supplements so that we can sing along with "the larger church." My friend has consequently renounced his prerogrative to choose the hymns, at least when these books are used. He explained to her and her new lady assistant that his training is in the cathedral tradition and he has no idea as to when any of this material would be appropriate or why. She suggested that he was guilty of insubordination for not having used any thus far, after = she had told him "on three occasions" that he "free" to choose music from = these books. He says now that he has become "just a minstrel" and prefers this to being blamed for forcing this stuff on unwilling congregants. If it's the rectorina's idea, she will just have to take the heat herself.   The longer I watch ECUSA, the more firmly convinced I become that the = people at the top wish its death.      
(back) Subject: Re: music list From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:02:52 -0400     Can you give me some examples of the praise music from "Lift every voice = and sing"?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 6/17/02 1:01 PM, Emmons, Paul at pemmons@wcupa.edu wrote:   >> It is interesting to me that the music of various denominations are so > similar > > In the Episcopal church, aggressive syncretism and eclecticism are > practically official policy, doncha know. The priestess for whom one of = my > friends works is determined to implement the express instructions of the > bishop to use praise music from "Lift every voice and sing" and other > supplements so that we can sing along with "the larger church." My = friend > has consequently renounced his prerogrative to choose the hymns, at = least > when these books are used. He explained to her and her new lady = assistant > that his training is in the cathedral tradition and he has no idea as to > when any of this material would be appropriate or why. She suggested = that > he was guilty of insubordination for not having used any thus far, after = she > had told him "on three occasions" that he "free" to choose music from = these > books. He says now that he has become "just a minstrel" and prefers = this > to being blamed for forcing this stuff on unwilling congregants. If = it's > the rectorina's idea, she will just have to take the heat herself. > > The longer I watch ECUSA, the more firmly convinced I become that the = people > at the top wish its death. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETEIF NOT INTERESTED From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:36:07 -0700   It's not a matter of PERMITTED, for the most part ... if I WANTED to, I could introduce TWELVE new hymns a year, since my practice is to repeat a new hymn for four Sundays running ... but there's frankly not THAT much that I WANT to introduce ... if I need a particular TEXT for a Feast-Day, for instance, and the tune isn't familiar and/or singable, we simply sing it to a familiar tune. THOSE I don't count as "new" hymns.   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote: > > We probably learn one or two totally new hymns a year. That's a > > fairly decent repertoire for a small congregation. > > > > Cheers, > > > > Bud > > I count myself extremely fortunate: I'm permitted to introduce one new = hymn > per Sunday! > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:33:03 -0400   >A brief perusal of the past two decades of journals in the field would indicate that the pendulum has swung, and Skinner instruments are fashionable enough again that several builders =   are claiming to be "the next Skinner."   May I suggest that, if this popularity is due to a swinging pendulum, it = is not the pendulum we think it is (tastes in organ tone or in musical = styles) but one or more much larger pendulums having to do with modernism/postmodernism, historical consciousness, and perhaps even a camp sensibility.   In historical consciousness, intelligent and knowledgeable people = appreciate artifacts of a bygone age as distinct from their contemporary successors. From what I gather, such distinctions just weren't usually operative = before the romantic era. If a building, for example, had to be rebuilt or enlarged, it would automatically be done in the style of the current time; no one would have thought to respect the style of the original work or to regret a mishmash of styles. Viollet-le-Duc in his work on Notre-Dame de Paris was quite innovative in seeing the Gothic style as something not-modern that was to be preserved or restored. The Gothic revival occurring at the same time was also a new development by deliberately designing new buildings in an antique style.   The modernism that characterized most of the twentieth century was based = on a faith in the enlightenment view that reason and science would lead to developments that all mankind would recognize as progress. = Post-modernism involves the evaporation of that faith. There are gains and losses in = both mind-sets, but perhaps among the gains of post-modernism is a curiosity = and respect for variety, and a greater receptiveness to the idea that past generations might have something to offer that we should not lose. Therefore, not just E.M. Skinner organs are valued more than before, but those of all previous generations.   I am not an art historian. Perhaps a list member who is could confirm, dispute, or enlarge upon these points.