PipeChat Digest #2914 - Monday, June 17, 2002
 
RE: music list
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETEIF	NOT INTE
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Correction to My Narrative!
  by <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF NOT  IN
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Will O. Headlee, in concert (x-post)
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT  I
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: Correction to My Narrative!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: Anglican Service Music -- DELETE IF NOT  INTERESTED
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Correction to My Narrative!
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: The Douglas St. Dunstan Kyriale in English, and others
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Frey in Chicago during OHS
  by <AFberlin3@aol.com>
Re: Correction to My Narrative!
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
RE: Frey in Chicago during OHS
  by "Harry Martenas" <hmartena@columbiapa.org>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --  DELETE IF NOT  
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --  DELETE	IF NOT  
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Correction to My Narrative!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK
  by <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk>
Re: Correction to My Narrative!
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: music list From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:46:18 -0400   I do not have a copy handy and have not yet needed to use the book professionally. Basically, this collection caters to African-Americans. = I have an older edition at home and will try to give some examples. = Perhaps I just need more experience, but it seems strange when white folks have = such a burning desire to imagine that they can sing like black folks that they invest thousands of dollars putting for these copies in the pews and spend every Sunday morning making the attempt.   A few minutes ago, I was having a senior moment trying to remember the = title of the other supplement. It's "Wonder, love and praise." I have some experience with this book. It contains much to which I can't particularly object from the standpoint of traditional tastes, but would just hope that it were used judiciously.        
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETEIF NOT INTERESTED From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:44:49 -0400   o but there's frankly not THAT > much that I WANT to introduce > Cheers, > > Bud   There are a significant number of classic hymns in the Lutheran Book of Worship that my congregation has yet to learn, or may have known in some past golden age but have forgotten, such as Gonfalon Royal, = Seelenbrautigam, Iste Confessor, Salva Festa Dies, Geneva, and St. Dunstan's. And then = there are all the fine new ones in With One Voice. I suspect your folks already know the classic ones. But we're in a cultural backwater here, with some catching up to do.   When I started here last year, the pastor would veto any "new" (new to the congregation that is) hymn I chose. But subsequently I got the Worship = and Music Committee to approve the idea of introducing one new hymn a Sunday = (I had been choosing more than one some Sundays, so they were arriving at a compromise position!); thus I have official backing, whatever the pastor = may think.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Correction to My Narrative! From: <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 13:07:13 -0500   At 06:28 AM 6/17/2002 -0700, Dr. Hall writes:   >On my next trip I have been promised another Scottish culinary treat: >a Mars bar, dipped in batter and deep-fried. Not even the >fried-green-tomatoes cuisine of the American South has heard of that >one, i'll bet...or has it??     Well, I'm but a transplanted American Southerner (albeit for nearly a decade now)...and I certainly haven't yet...!   Depending on the consistency of the batter, though, I daresay the Mars bar =   sounds like a tastier recipe....! <LOLOL>   Uhhboy... I hope this doesn't turn into another thread of recipes for ok*a... ;-)   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR (who still often likes to eat like a Midwesterner - gimme a STEAK!)   PS -- Thanks, Jonathan, for sharing your experiences!!      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition --DELETE IF NOT INTERE... From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 14:53:26 EDT     --part1_81.1d212bcf.2a3f8a26_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 6/17/02 1:27:41 PM Atlantic Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > My pet peeve at the moment is some of the service music ... the Willan > Mass in particular (the Second Communion Service in the 1940) ... I find > the Merbecke (the First Communion Service) MUCH less wearying. The > Willan isn't BAD; it's just worn OUT, having been sung in this country > since 1928 (!).     May I humbly suggest the Powell service in the 1982 book. That will send =   you screaming back to Willan in no time!!     Bruce in the Muttestery   with the Baskerbeagles at <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A> = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502 .... need extra money??? visit http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053 enjoy shopping?? visit www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg   --part1_81.1d212bcf.2a3f8a26_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">In a message dated 6/17/02 1:27:41 PM Atlantic = Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">My pet peeve at = the moment is some of the service music ... the Willan<BR> Mass in particular (the Second Communion Service in the 1940) ... I = find<BR> the Merbecke (the First Communion Service) MUCH less wearying. The<BR> Willan isn't BAD; it's just worn OUT, having been sung in this country<BR> since 1928 (!).</BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> <BR> May I humbly suggest the Powell service in the 1982 book.&nbsp;&nbsp; That = will send you screaming back to Willan in no time!!<BR> <BR> <BR> Bruce in the Muttestery <BR> <BR> with the Baskerbeagles at&nbsp; <A = HREF=3D"http://members.tripod.com/brucon502">HowlingAcres</A>&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://members.tripod.com/brucon502<BR> ....&nbsp; need extra money???&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp;&nbsp; = http://www.visionsuccess.com/BC2053<BR> enjoy shopping??&nbsp;&nbsp; visit&nbsp; www.freestoreclub.com/go/BDawg = <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_81.1d212bcf.2a3f8a26_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Will O. Headlee, in concert (x-post) From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 14:16:27 -0400   Dear listers,   Syracuans were treated yesterday to the program Will O. Headlee is playing for the OHS Convention in Chicago !   And, what a treat it was ! The organ Will is playing in Chicago is quite unusual ( A WurliTzer classical) and his Syracuse concert was performed on the new Quimby at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral in Syracuse.   I call a the St. Paul's organ a Quimby even though it is a rebuild of a 1968 Moller, because it is so drastically a "different" instrument ! There were many things I liked about the original Moller installation, the new instrument is an improvement of monumental proportions.   Will's program follows:   Fantasy: Torah Song - Craig Phillips (b. 1961)   Fantaisie (in E-flat) (1857) - Saint-Saens   Prelude and Fugue in G Major, BWV 541 - Bach   Grand Choeur Triomphal, Op.47, No. 2 - Guilmant   Landscape in Mist, Op 96, No. 2 - Karg-Elert   Naiades (Water Sprites), Op.55, No. 4 - Vierne   Clair de Lune, Op. 53, No 5 - Vierne (dedicated to ERnest Skinner)   Introduction, Passicaglia and Fugue - Healey Willian   Sweet Sixteenths, A Concert Rag for Organ - William Albright   Toccata on "Leonie" Op.36, No. 3 - Seth Bingham       As you can see by the diversity of this program, the Quimby instrument is VERY flexible ! This is the second concert I've heard on this - the first being Ken Cowan's dedication program - and it continues to amaze me with it's versitility and depth !   Those of you going to the OHS Convention are in for a real experience with this program and those us stuck in Syracuse will have to make do with this wonderful new instrument !       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 03:03:08 +0800 (CST)   And don't forget that "Holy Offerings Rich and Rare" in Hymnal 1940 at St. Bartholomew's, New York, New York was sung, so the story goes, each Sunday at the presentation of the offering...   And when I was in the Junior Choir at my home church I always enjoyed singing that hymn as our offertory...   Unfortunately the powers-that-be, or should I say editors-that-be, purged that hymn from Hymnal 1982.... (sigh)     Best wishes to all,       Morton Belcher fellow list member...         On Mon, 17 Jun 2002 quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Oh, I disagree, Randy ... we sing "Day By Day" to the tune "Sumner" in > the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 as the Kneeling Hymn at the end of EVERY > service, Mass OR Evensong, and have done so ever since I came to St. > Matthew's five years ago ... and older Episcopalians remember singing it > since 1940, at LEAST! (grin).     > > > > on 6/17/02 10:36 AM, r at basset3@citlink.net wrote: > > > > "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is one of the favorites of the new > > hymns in our church > > > > Now sing it 100 times over and over to please everyone -- > > then review your opinion. > > > > Robert Clooney > > > > That is a test no hymn would pass. > > > > Randy Runyon > > Music Director > > Zion Lutheran Church > > Hamilton, Ohio > > runyonr@muohio.edu > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Correction to My Narrative! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 15:03:09 EDT   Dear Tim:   ROTFLMAO: I've come up with the perfect "Southern Lunch."   A plate of mashed taters smothered in thick chicken gravy, and KFC Pop corn chicken in super crispy, served on a bed of Fried onion rings and oak-re, a side of Jalapaneo and cheese pot stickers, and a Texas Chili size, and a large Mic draft to wash it down with. :)   Ron  
(back) Subject: RE: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 15:10:47 -0400   Bud writes:   >I have proposed that we switch to Missa Marialis (the Fourth Communion Service) for a year so they can LEARN it. We do it occasionally; they know the Kyrie.   Charles Winfred Douglas's edition, called, I think, the Plainsong Kyrial, published by H.W. Gray in the days when they didn't have to be ashamed of catering to the needs of Episcopalians, badly needs to be reprinted. It contained about a dozen settings of the ordinary of the mass from the Gregorian repertoire, in plainsong notation. Some of the Individual = masses (e.g. Missa de Angelis and Missa Penitentialis) were also printed as octavos. I would be delighted to be able to introduce two or three of = these to a congregation over a period of years, and use some of the others chorally.   John Boe's doctoral dissertation _The Ordinary in English_ argues that Douglas's editions of the ordinary are the best in English, better than anything from England.   There was a thrown-together, privately published mass setting ca. 1970 called "The Winds of God." It was very uneven and, I think, mostly disgusting-- but the Kyrie was that of the Missa Marialis, accompanied by = a few guitar strums. It may be that simply by accompanying this music on = the guitar instead of the organ people will find it kewl. Considering that a guitar accompaniment to plainsong is arguably no less authentic than an organ accompaniment, If it will get people to accept this music it's worth = a try.   I have often wondered, too, if The Anglican Folk Mass by Martin Shaw would have a leg up simply because of its title.      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: Anglican Service Music -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 12:27:21 -0700   Er, ah, Bruce, what Hymnal was that again? (grin) Think I've HEARD of it, maybe (chuckle).   Of course, the larger issue at St. Matthew's is choral vs. congregational settings of the Ordinary of the Mass.   I have a choir that's QUITE capable of singing the simpler Renaissance Masses, the smaller Haydn and Mozart Masses, Rheinberger, Langlais, Oldroyd, etc. ... the typical fare that one sees on the smaller anglo-catholic "shrine" churches' music lists week by week.   Our two-Masses-with-music schedule was ostensibly set up to provide for that ... the 9:00 Mass was to be a Prayer-Book Communion service, with congregational sung Ordinary (Merbecke, Willan or Marialis); the 11:00 Mass was to be a Missal Mass with choral Ordinary and Proper.   But that compromise died before the ink was dry on the agreement.   The rector now insists that the congregation at the High Mass not ONLY sing the ORDINARY, but the INTROIT, GRADUAL and ALLELUIA of the PROPERS as WELL, to invariable formulae from English Gradual II. All the polyphonic Propers I wrote over the last five years are gathering dust on the shelf.   The choir, which was forcibly moved to the 9:00 Mass, has nothing to do but an anthem; the paid chanter who replaced the choir at the High Mass sings the Offertory, Communion and two solos, and there you have it.   Having nothing much to do, the choir has taken to singing Evensong, which is fine; but they could have done that AND maintained a choral High Mass IF they'd been ALLOWED to.   I have been informed that choral settings of the Ordinary are "un-Anglican."   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Correction to My Narrative! From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 15:42:01 -0400   YUK!!!   A more revolting dish would be hard to imagine, - I am really glad that I can still eat proper food in Canada!   Bob Conway...   At 03:03 PM 6/17/02 -0400, you wrote: >Dear Tim: > >ROTFLMAO: I've come up with the perfect "Southern Lunch." > >A plate of mashed taters smothered in thick chicken gravy, >and KFC Pop corn chicken in super crispy, served on a bed >of Fried onion rings and oak-re, a side of Jalapaneo and cheese >pot stickers, and a Texas Chili size, and a large Mic draft to >wash it down with. :) > >Ron > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: The Douglas St. Dunstan Kyriale in English, and others From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 12:51:41 -0700       "Emmons, Paul" wrote: > > Bud writes: > > >I have proposed that we switch to Missa Marialis (the Fourth Communion > Service) for a year so they can LEARN it. We do it occasionally; they = know > the Kyrie. > > Charles Winfred Douglas's edition, called, I think, the Plainsong = Kyrial, > published by H.W. Gray in the days when they didn't have to be ashamed = of > catering to the needs of Episcopalians, badly needs to be reprinted. It > contained about a dozen settings of the ordinary of the mass from the > Gregorian repertoire, in plainsong notation. Some of the Individual = masses > (e.g. Missa de Angelis and Missa Penitentialis) were also printed as > octavos. I would be delighted to be able to introduce two or three of = these > to a congregation over a period of years, and use some of the others > chorally. > > John Boe's doctoral dissertation _The Ordinary in English_ argues that > Douglas's editions of the ordinary are the best in English, better than > anything from England. > > At one point, I proposed that we learn the principal Gregorian Masses in English, some to Canon Douglas' settings:   Advent-Christmastide-Epiphanytide - Missa Marialis (cum Jubilo) Pre-Lent and Lent - Penitentialis Eastertide - Pentecost - Paschalis (Lux et origo) Trinity to Advent - Dominicalis (Orbis factor) and de Angelis in alternation   and perhaps one other for Feast Days.   I would retain Douglas' adaptations of Marialis and de Angelis, because a few people still remember them; for the others, I'd probably do my own.   If one compares Douglas with the Latin originals, one discovers that he WASN'T terribly faithful to them in a LOT of instances. That is NOT to say that they're not SINGABLE, because they ARE. But they are more "Douglas BASED on Gregorian" than "Douglas' English ADAPTATION of Gregorian."   A case in point is the Gloria in excelsis he prints for Missa Dominicalis ... it's NOT the Gloria of Orbis factor; I think it's Semi-Doubles #2, sort of; but I've NEVER been able to find a Latin version that comes CLOSE.   Likewise, he prints the Gloria of Alme pater (Mass X) with the Kyrie-Sanctus-Agnus of cum Jubilo (Mass IX) and calls it "Missa Marialis". Now, that's not particularly a BAD thing in and of itself ... the Gloria of cum Jubilo has a WIDE range, and probably isn't suitable for congregational singing ... but the mix should have been IDENTIFIED.   I DO agree that English Gradual I (the Ordinary) is QUITE dreadful ... Palmer issued a few of the more obscure Masses of the Kyriale as separate folios ... I wonder why he never did the more popular ones? Perhaps English Gradual I was already too firmly entrenched. Or perhaps it was because the polyphonic Ordinary was a hallmark of the Oxford Movement from the beginning in England ... all those Masses from Faith Press, etc.   I have thought of seeking permission to do a new edition of the St. Dunstan Kyriale in modern notation ... I think for PARISH CHURCHES and PARISH CHOIRS, the square notation is a pretty big barrier, though I taught my choir to read it over the course of about three months. The problem comes when we have singers from "outside" come in to help on big days ... they haven't a CLUE how to read Gregorian notation, and in the limited rehearsal time available I don't have time to TEACH them, so we invariably have to revert to modern notation. Our Holy Week choirbooks (for instance) are entirely in modern notation.   Of course, it's all moot with the ICEL "translation" ... the truncated, re-arranged paraphrase of the Gloria in excelsis is virtually IMPOSSIBLE to adapt to ANY known Setting, Latin or English.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Frey in Chicago during OHS From: <AFberlin3@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 15:56:48 EDT     --part1_178.9e8afb3.2a3f9900_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Friends,   As it turns out, I will be in Chicago visiting my family during the OHS convention. I would enjoy meeting many of you.   Could you please inform me of convention events and dates? Is there a = hotel where you all will be congregating after the evening concerts?   I hope to see you.   All best, Alexander Frey   --part1_178.9e8afb3.2a3f9900_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Dear Friends,<BR> <BR> As it turns out, I will be in Chicago visiting my family during the OHS = convention.&nbsp; I would enjoy meeting many of you.<BR> <BR> Could you please inform me of convention events and dates? Is there a = hotel where you all will be congregating after the evening concerts?<BR> <BR> I hope to see you.<BR> <BR> All best,<BR> Alexander Frey</FONT></HTML>   --part1_178.9e8afb3.2a3f9900_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Correction to My Narrative! From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 08:47:52 +1200   Fried Mars bars are also sold here in the deep South Seas. The thought revolts me, to be honest, but my thought is worthless as I've not tried = one. Ross   >On my next trip I have been promised another Scottish culinary treat: >a Mars bar, dipped in batter and deep-fried. Not even the >fried-green-tomatoes cuisine of the American South has heard of that >one, i'll bet...or has it??      
(back) Subject: RE: Frey in Chicago during OHS From: "Harry Martenas" <hmartena@columbiapa.org> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 16:29:54 -0400   Lots of information here: http://www.organsociety.org/2002/index.html   The OHS runs a "bookstore" at the convention with all sorts of books, CDs, sheet music, etc. There's generally a crowd there. Otherwise, check the hotel lounge!   /Harry Martenas   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of AFberlin3@aol.com Sent: Monday, June 17, 2002 2:57 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Frey in Chicago during OHS     Dear Friends,   As it turns out, I will be in Chicago visiting my family during the OHS convention. I would enjoy meeting many of you.   Could you please inform me of convention events and dates? Is there a hotel where you all will be congregating after the evening concerts?   I hope to see you.   All best, Alexander Frey      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 17:02:32 -0500   At 03:03 AM 6/18/02 +0800, you wrote: >And don't forget that "Holy Offerings Rich and Rare" in Hymnal 1940 at = St. >Bartholomew's, New York, New York was sung, so the story goes, each = Sunday >at the presentation of the offering... >   many Lutherans have had the custom of singing "We give thee but thine own" - tune=3D Energy at the presentation of the offering, every week. although with hymnal changes the tradtion is perhaps less widespread than it once was       Regards, Richard Jordan   http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: hymns that weather constant repetition -- DELETE IF NOT INTERESTED From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 18:29:50 -0400   On 6/17/02 6:02 PM, "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> wrote:   > many Lutherans have had the custom of singing > "We give thee but thine own" - tune=3D Energy > at the presentation of the offering, every week. > although with hymnal changes the tradtion is > perhaps less widespread than it once was > My goodness, what a ringer from the past. I think it was gone by 1959, = but you're sure right! I wouldn't call that a hymn (though of course it is), but the Offertory Canticle, part of the Ordinary of the Lutheran Mass of pre-1958.   (I'd forGOTten! Thank you.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Correction to My Narrative! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 18:07:18 -0500   Apparently Mr. Lampert (or is it Mr. Severin - I can't tell who wrote the suggested Southern lunch) is unversed in Southern haute cuisine.   A classic Southern Sunday lunch would be more on the order of homemade fried chicken, the drippings used to make the brown gravy, and probably served with rice rather than mashed potatoes; turnip or collard greens, with rooster spur pepper sauce and relish on the side; squash cut up with onions and cooked in an iron skillet until all the water is cooked out OR squash or eggplant sliced, lightly floured and fried; okra, either battered and fried or not battered and fried much in the same fashion as the squash; sliced tomatoes OR stewed tomatoes OR tomato gravy; sliced onions and cucumbers in vinegar; fresh garden onions; and peach cobbler or chocolate cake with ice cream. This would be served with homemade biscuits and cornbread, with sweetened ice tea.   No self-respecting old-school Southerner would serve popcorn chicken or any other chicken from KFC to guests. This from an area where for years the only organ was the Hammond.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: RE: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK From: <cmys13085@blueyonder.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 00:58:14 +0100   Hello=20   H & H build quality.......well, I don't know whether you have ever = crawled around a vintage Harrison, but the quality is just fantastic. = The materials are especially good....lots of good English Oak, yards of = big timber in the building frames, lots of Honduras mahogony for face = boards and top boards, beautiful quality felts, exceptionally reliable = pneumatics with first class leather work. They just go on and on....never a rattle or a sticking anything...even = the pedal springs stay taut for decades. Real ivory keys and stop = heads....the list is endless.=20   It boils down to a Harrison commitment to absolute quality....especially = in the days of Arthur Harrison, when money was no object on either side = of the pond.   I just don't think anyone builds like this anymore.....some of the = leather is now virtually unobtainable and the exotic woods far too = expensive in the quantities described. There are numerous H & H organs = which are still perfectly functional after 80 years, even with pneumatic = action.   In the UK, perhaps only Hill ever came close to the same quality.   Fashion? Well, I may be a bit out of touch with the USA scene, though I = doubt that anyone would want to perfectly re-create the Skinner sound, = anymore than anyone would want to re-create the Arthur Harrison = sound.However, I suspect that there has been a shift away from German = voicing in the wrong buildings on both sides of the pond.   The little Baroque gem I play is so bearable because it is Dutch in = character, with very warm Flute sounds and a rather breathy Principal.   Another feature of H & H is the wonderful layout inside the = instruments...always a joy to work on and tune, with proper walk-ways, = solid ladders and plenty of hand holds. Incidentally, the first H & H = electro-pneumatic action, from around 1911 (?) or so, still functions = and the console feels as good as it always did. (I would have to check = the date to verify this)   I suppose H & H just over-engineered everything, but that was very = common before 1950 in the UK.....the same was true of tape-recorders and = washing machines, which just went on forever.   Another H & H trait is the immaculate voicing....some would say = "over-regulated" to the point that their instruments seldom have a hair = out of place. The ranks are so incredibly "even" in tonal match.   It was, I suppose, a golden era in organ-building in the UK. St Mary, = Redcliffe is the same to H & H as Liverpool Cathedral is to Willis = 3.....their finest creations.   I have to say finally, that one organ builder probably exceeded even the = quality of H & H.....Goetze and Gwynn in the UK. Never have I seen finer = joints or more immaculate workmanship inside an instrument......like = looking at a Chippendale dining suite. They elevated a craft into a = fine art form.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       -----Original Message----- From: "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> Subject: Re: St.Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, UK   Dear Mr. Mitchell:   could you please=20 clarify the following statement you made to the list: "For build quality, Harrison & Harrison have never been surpassed in = the=20 UK or anywhere else in the world." That is quite an endorsement. Another interesting statement is the one before it, in which you = state=20 that the pipe organ in question is "admittedly dated in the same way = that a=20 Skinner organ is now 'old fashioned'". A brief perusal of the past two=20 decades of journals in the field would indicate that the pendulum has = swung,=20 and Skinner instruments are fashionable enough again that several = builders=20 are claiming to be "the next Skinner."   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Correction to My Narrative! From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2002 20:18:35 EDT   Well Glenda:   I'm only from Southern CA. not the deep deep south. Hey I happen to like cheese and Jalapaneo pot stickers. I thought the Col. was from the south, Southern Ontario, Canada. :) Well, I stand corrected, no musshy Ocra. Just fried.   Ron