PipeChat Digest #2917 - Tuesday, June 18, 2002
 
Re: Digital creativity
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Re: Shining on
  by "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org>
Southern Hammonds
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Dripping Syrup
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Shining on
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov>
A new descant
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
Irreverent Organist Recruitment Drive
  by "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org>
music for the one manual organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Shining on
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
First United Methodist Church, Graham TX
  by <Pologaptommy@aol.com>
Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin)
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Digital creativity From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 13:53:35 -0500   I believe I have guitar chords for anything you could throw at me   certainly for anything that a Lutheran would likely sing   it was part of a project to try a deter Lutherans from   singing priase choruses from Vineyard Fellowship   by showing that if you must use guitar   you can still sing all the traditional hymns,     it is quite an experience to hear   [without saying if it was good or bad]   A Mighty Fortress   with a country western guitar twang   although I do prefer it nicely done on a pipe organ         At 12:42 PM 6/18/02 EDT, you wrote:   >>>>   <excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param>.. and there are others (none of which have gittar chords!)   </fontfamily><fontfamily><param>arial</param>   </fontfamily></excerpt><fontfamily><param>arial</param><<<<<<<<     </fontfamily>       Regards,   Richard Jordan     http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com   http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Shining on From: "Richard Jordan" <mail@gesangbuch.org> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 14:04:26 -0500   At 01:17 AM 6/19/02 +1000, you wrote: >> But what fault can you possibly find with these words:   Lutherans have been carefully trained to be suspicuous of Theology of Glory and to focus instead on the Theology of the Cross and there is some wisdom in this.   If you examine yourself by the 10 commandments and truly see all your sins it is hard to imagine the penitent heart being able to sing Shine Jesus Shine without a considerable amount of convincing that they are forgiven and really a new creation after they are convinced, certainly... although they would probably prefer to sing something else something that focuses more on the Savior and less on self       Regards, Richard Jordan   http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com http://www.OnJordansBanks.com  
(back) Subject: Southern Hammonds From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 15:44:27 -0500   The meals sound delicious, but let's not forget that Henry Erben had a number of significant southern installations long before Mr. Hammond = showed up--yes, well before the Civil War (or "The War of Northern Aggression" to you southerners).   And if you'd like an Erben, OCH listed three right now!   Dennis Steckley Yankee owner of 3-rank Artiste   "No, no.....this from an area where for years the only organ still is the Hammond! lol Where I live, if a church doesn't have a Hammond, they've upgraded an = bought an Allen. If they have a pipe organ, you can pretty much gamble on the = fact that it's a Moller. In this part of SC, the Allen dealer and Moller rep have had strong inroads. Unfortunately, some of the Hammond installations = sound better than the 3 rank Artistes and 1975 Allens.      
(back) Subject: Dripping Syrup From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 15:47:54 -0500   I've ALWAYS loved learning new songs, but I'm convinced the average person in the pew would be totally satisfied if we alternated about 25 difference hymns year round (well, through in a couple of Easter, Xmas, patriotic, = and TG favorites).   Dennis Steckley "For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God."    
(back) Subject: Re: Shining on From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 16:48:48 -0400   Very intriguing, but I'm not quite sure whether you are saying that Lutherans, being fallible human beings, tend to be suspicious of the Theology of Glory and to prefer to sing something other than "Shine, = Jesus, Shine," or whether you are saying that you, as a Missouri Synod pastor = (and I was delighted to find your website with all the sermons to read!), hold the position that the Theology of Glory (frankly, a new term for me) is heretical and that "Shine, Jesus, Shine" is invalid theologically because (maybe) it states that "our faces [may] display [Christ's] likeness."   Why, by the way, do you say that "Shine, Jesus, Shine" focuses more on = self than on the Savior? The words quite clearly declare that whatever glory = or light the self enjoys comes from Christ. Is it wrong to want to feel that light and that glory? And it's not gnostic (in the sense Philip J. Lee gives the term) because there is as much "us" as "me" in the words.   Sure, I agree that the song should be sung after, not before, the Brief Order for Confession and Forgiveness! Only after confession has been made and forgiveness granted does one have a right to sing it. But are you saying that even after confession and forgiveness a Lutheran cannot in = good conscience sing it or that even after confession and forgiveness some "carefully trained" Lutherans would not feel comfortable singing it?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 6/18/02 3:04 PM, Richard Jordan at mail@gesangbuch.org wrote:   > At 01:17 AM 6/19/02 +1000, you wrote: >>> But what fault can you possibly find with these words: > > Lutherans have been carefully trained to be suspicuous of > Theology of Glory and to focus instead on the Theology of the Cross > and there is some wisdom in this. > > If you examine yourself by the 10 commandments > and truly see all your sins > it is hard to imagine the penitent heart being able > to sing Shine Jesus Shine > without a considerable amount of convincing > that they are forgiven and really a new creation > after they are convinced, certainly... > although they would probably prefer to sing something else > something that focuses more on the Savior and less on self > > > > Regards, > Richard Jordan > > http://www.Lutheran-Hymnal.com > http://www.OnJordansBanks.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 14:24:15 -0700   There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would EVER require.   Something like:   MANUAL - C-c4, 61 notes   (exposed)   8' Open Diapason 4' Octave 2 2/3' Twelfth 2' Fifteenth   (enclosed)   16' Bourdon (1-12 outside swell box, possibly common with Pedal 16') 8' Melodia 8' Gamba 4' Harmonic Flute 8' Trumpet or Oboe   Manual Sub-Octave Coupler All stops divided at middle c   PEDAL - C-f1, 30 notes   16' Sub Bass 8' Violoncello 8' Trumpet or Oboe (by transmission from Manual)   Pedal to Pedal 10 2/3 (a favorite of Hook and Hastings on small organs) Manual to Pedal   If one draws the 16' Bourdon and the 4' Flute in the treble and plays the right hand up an octave, and the 4' Flute and the 2' Fifteenth in the bass and plays the left hand down an octave, most trios can be accommodated, and so forth.   The 4' Octave or 4' Flute played down an octave can accompany a c.f. on the Trumpet or Oboe in the treble, or Melodia + Twelth, or whatever.   The unenclosed Principal chorus will serve for a plenum in Bach; if a fuller plenum is needed, one can play up an octave with the manual sub-coupler. If a secondary chorus is needed, one could throw off the sub-coupler and come down an octave, or retire the Twelfth and Fifteenth.   Alternatively, the resources COULD be spread over two manuals by means of "either-or" pallets.   If space and money was available, a celeste and a (treble) Cornet or Sesquialtera might be desirable, and/or a Mixture.   Of course, all this assumes SUPERB voicing and scaling, such as one would find in a 19th century organ by Hook, Johnson, etc.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: <Phil_Cooper@dot.ca.gov> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 14:50:06 -0700   = quilisma@socal = .rr.com To: pipechat = <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent by: cc: = <pipechat@pipe Subject: re: one-manual pipe = organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) chat.org> = = = 06/18/2002 = 02:24 PM = Please respond = to "PipeChat" = = =               Three cheers for the one manual organ!!! As some of you may know, I have been a champion of one manual organs in small parish churches for very = long time. I have had many experiences (as we all have) with rural churches with you-know-whats where a small one manual organ would have been so beautiful and ever so usable.   My experience with the historic Pennsylvania-German organs has absolutely convinced me that organists need to listen to the beautiful sounds and enjoy what they are hearing and to seek out music to play on one manual organs. In my experience playing recitals on these wonderful little organs, I have never, ever had the problem of what to play. Rather, my problem has always been - how to keep the recital from lasting too long!! There is an incredible wealth of organ music from many periods of time written to be played on one manual organs. A great deal of this music = (not all, of course) does NOT need divided stops much less a second manual.   Would that more churches (and organists!) place SOUND QUALITY and spirited performances of this music above having all the gadgets that we Americans seem so attached to. The stoplist in Bud's e-mail is surprisingly similar to that of a moderately-small sized organ by David Tannenberg (1728-1804). This central German style with its string stops (the organs of Thuringia even had celests!) would also find a welcome home in small American churches. Stoplists such as this one should be looked at more closely and seen as a viable option for the small, rural American church. Imagine how the singing of the hymns on Sunday morning would improve!!   Philip T. D. Cooper Davis, California   There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would EVER require.   Something like:   MANUAL - C-c4, 61 notes   (exposed)   8' Open Diapason 4' Octave 2 2/3' Twelfth 2' Fifteenth   (enclosed)   16' Bourdon (1-12 outside swell box, possibly common with Pedal 16') 8' Melodia 8' Gamba 4' Harmonic Flute 8' Trumpet or Oboe   Manual Sub-Octave Coupler All stops divided at middle c   PEDAL - C-f1, 30 notes   16' Sub Bass 8' Violoncello 8' Trumpet or Oboe (by transmission from Manual)   Pedal to Pedal 10 2/3 (a favorite of Hook and Hastings on small organs) Manual to Pedal   If one draws the 16' Bourdon and the 4' Flute in the treble and plays the right hand up an octave, and the 4' Flute and the 2' Fifteenth in the bass and plays the left hand down an octave, most trios can be accommodated, and so forth.   The 4' Octave or 4' Flute played down an octave can accompany a c.f. on the Trumpet or Oboe in the treble, or Melodia + Twelth, or whatever.   The unenclosed Principal chorus will serve for a plenum in Bach; if a fuller plenum is needed, one can play up an octave with the manual sub-coupler. If a secondary chorus is needed, one could throw off the sub-coupler and come down an octave, or retire the Twelfth and Fifteenth.   Alternatively, the resources COULD be spread over two manuals by means of "either-or" pallets.   If space and money was available, a celeste and a (treble) Cornet or Sesquialtera might be desirable, and/or a Mixture.   Of course, all this assumes SUPERB voicing and scaling, such as one would find in a 19th century organ by Hook, Johnson, etc.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: A new descant From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 22:59:25 +0100   Dear Pipechatters,   If any of you who run choirs are interested, I've put another descant that = I have written on the Sibelius Music Website. It's for the hymn 'God of = grace and God of glory' which is sung to the tune 'Regent Square'. These words aren't that popular I don't think, but it was a hymn chosen for a service being sung in Canterbury Cathedral this coming Sunday (23rd June) and so written for this. If any of you would prefer me to set alternative words that you sing to this tune, then I will quite happily do this for you. I would be interested to hear if any of you make use of this descant, and indeed if any of you have used any of my other compositions. They are all totally free for you to use. The url is http://www.sibeliusmusic.com/cgi-bin/showscore.pl?scoreid=3D23669   Steve Barker Canterbury UK    
(back) Subject: Irreverent Organist Recruitment Drive From: "Bob Richardson" <bob@peak.org> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 15:14:45 -0700 (PDT)   Hello there -   Some of you may have noticed my occasional postings about my organ project - if not, here's a summary:   I'm restoring an old console (kindly donated by another member of this list) to become a touring classical organ. I am putting on a concert outdoors in the middle of the Nevada desert at the Burning Man event in August.   (Yes, that's right, classical organ performance outdoors in the middle of the desert in August - on generator power no less - why not?)   If you know what Burning Man is, are interested in going (or are definitely going), I would gladly welcome other performers to come and play my organ in front of others!   (If you don't know what Burning Man is, you can check out www.burningman.com - beware those who are easily offended - you have been warned.)   So, if sharing a parched plot of land with 25,000 revelers of various odd persuasions appeals to you, and bringing organ music to these people appeals even more, drop me a line and share our camp!   The instrument so far:   A restored Schoenstein 2M console, fully MIDI enabled, controlling two Ahlbron Archive MIDI organ modules. (The Ahlborn 201 - a basic baroque 20-rank organ - has arrived and is working, the Ahlborn 'Romantic' - a supplemental module with various reeds and celestes, is forthcoming.) Add a Syndyne stop tab controller to make the thing usable from the console, and a touch of digital reverb. (The desert is a very (ahem) dry acoustical environment.) A pair of Klipsch LaScala speakers substitutes for an organ chamber.   If anyone wants to drag along a theatre organ to spice up the show, you are of course more than welcome to make a spectacle of yourself!   Now if I can just get this thing put together in time to practice!   Best wishes, Bob Richardson, Virtuoso Mad Scientist      
(back) Subject: music for the one manual organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 15:30:16 -0700   Just off the top of my head ...   Buxtehude How Brightly Shines the Morning Star many of the Preludes and Fugues   Bach the entire Clavieruebung III, small version all of the misc. manualiter chorale preludes any of the Preludes & Fugues that don't REQUIRE manual changes most of the chorale preludes with the c.f. in the soprano some of the trios, depending on ranges   Boellmann - the harmonium pieces (Heures Mystiques?)   The Climax Series of Books for Harmonium (Paxton, U.K.) - LOVE the name, and there's some fun stuff in them ... Wesley, Webbe, etc.   Church Organist's Golden Treasury (3 Vols.) - the Walther partitas, etc.   Couperin - a treble Cornet would help, but one could still play MOST of both Masses   Dandrieu - Duos, Grand Jeux, Plein Jeux   Distler - the book of music for the house organ   Dupre - the chorale preludes on plainsong hymns, some of the Antiphons, etc.   Frescobaldi - the entire Fiori musicale, etc.   Froberger - the Toccatas, etc.   Franck - L'Organiste   Guilmant - many of the pieces from The Practical Organist and The Liturgical Organist   Handel - many of the concerto movements, from the two-stave Schott edition   Karg-Elert - does anybody know where to FIND his harmonium pieces??   Langlais - the two harmonium books   Lorenz - any of the two stave organ magazines (let's be practical here) (grin)   Muffat - Apparatus musico-organisticus   Music for Manuals - Oxford University Press - multiple volumes   Pachelbel - the partitas, the chorale preludes   Peeters - the harmonium book(s?), etc.   The Parish Organist (Concordia) (multiple vols.)   Reger - many of the medium-sized chorale preludes (Op. 100? Op. 65? I forget ... it's at the church)   Fr. Carlo Rossini - The Liturgical Organist (multiple vols.) - OK, go ahead and laugh, but there are some transcriptions in there that you won't find anywhere ELSE ... Corelli, etc. ... and some of the small pieces by 19th century German composers as well.   Scheidt - most of it   Tournemire - the harmonium books   Vierne - the little pieces on two staves (what IS the name of those books? They're all at church)   Widor - many of the slow movements of the Symphonies       Now, it requires a little DIGGING to FIND some of this stuff, particularly the French harmonium books ...   The Paxton books may be out of print, but they turn up from time to time.   Any good large American library will probably have some of the 19th century American harmonium collections as well.   It would seem to me than any organist who had most of the above repertoire under his/her fingers would have a well-rounded collection of music, both for church services AND for recitals.   There are various published bibliographies of "Music for the Small Organ" ... I just don't happen to have them at hand ... most of the above is in my own library.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Shining on From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 18:33:57 EDT   Hi, I thought I would like to add a thought to the subject. I am the organist at a large United Methodist Church. I was made aware, = when I first took the job, that there are two songs in which the music suite staff, and directors cannot and will not ever change. Those songs are the =   Gloria Patri (which is only sung at the second service) and the Doxology, which is sung for all three services after the offertory. I once changed = the chords in the amen at the end of the Doxology to a CM chord in on the = manual, with a D played on the pedal, then of course progressed as written to = resolve on GM. It had a much fuller sound in my opinion, and gave it a more "resolved" feeling I guess. However there were several people in the = church that noticed the change, however insignificant, and I was told from then = on to end the amen with a CM chord, and resolve on GM, exactly as written. = So that was the end of that. My point is I guess, that people in my church who do not take well to = change, can be assured that when they come to church, as they have for the past = 40+ years, that at least those two songs will remain as part of the service, = not matter what. The average age in my church is 38. This means of course, = that there is a lot of contraversy over the singing of traditional hymns, or adding contemporary hymns in the main services. We have had our share of contemporary hymns since the interim director of music stepped in, but = before he stepped in, there were no contemporary hymns sung. I guess that will = just be a matter of what the congregation wants to do, and no one can argue = with that. Even with over 1,200 anthems in the music suite library, we still will = sing Tom Fettke's "The Majesty and Glory of Your Name" at LEAST twice a year. = <G> We also use the United Methodist Hymnal, and the 2000 edition of the UMH, =   AND the Celebration Hymnal, along with the Cokesbury hymnal in the chapel. = But even with ALL those wonderful hymns to choose from, a recent survey = taken in our church revealed that the congregation as a "whole" preferred the = same group of about 80 hymns. I guess we, the music staff at FUMC, Graham, TX, =   just learned to give the congregation a mixture of what they enjoy, = whether it be a formal hymn, or a contemporary hymn. Whatever makes THEIR worship =   services enjoyable. So if they want to sing Shine, Jesus Shine (which the =   Genesis Choir HAS sung as an anthem) a thousand times a year, why not let them enjoy it?   Just my opinion Josh White FUMC, Graham TX www.fumcgraham.org; FUMC organ pics: www.geocities.com/polo_gap_tommie   PS: I will add that since the interim DOM has "reigned" over the Music = Suite, during our search for a full-time DOM, money has been pouring into the = music suite, and the organ account, more than EVER!  
(back) Subject: First United Methodist Church, Graham TX From: <Pologaptommy@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 18:53:05 EDT   I was just going to let yall know, that Sunday morning, about 1:00, our sanctuary was hit by a small tornado, tearing off the roof above the Nave. = The section of the roof that was taken completely off, stretched from directly over the Chancel and organ chambers, all the way over the Nave, = to the Narthex. As many of you know, the church was just completely = renovated in 2000, and everything was replaced during the 2000 renovation including = a new wood chancel floor, 40 new chandeliers, new pews, new communion rails, =   new pulpit, new alter, new carpet, and all the wood was completely = restored to a beautiful dark mahogany finish. Sadly, after the storm Sunday morning, many of these things are severely damaged, and will have to be replaced, or restored, including the wood ceilings, the new wood chancel, and the organ facade. The worst damage = was the result of large amounts of water that came into the sanctuary, and drained down the sides of the ceilings, causing a lot of the wood to swell = up and buckle under the pressure. It was quite a sad site to see, after how grand it looked before, to what = it turned into after a little bit of rain and wind had its toll. But, on the =   bright side, there have been crews from Dallas working 14 hours a day on preserving as much as they can, and hopefully we will NOT have to hold services in the gym, because I was told that there was a good chance that = the sanctuary will be better than new by this Sunday. Also, fortunately the only damage the pipe organ sustained, was to the 16' =   bourdon that is on top of the chambers. And of course, all the = preventative measures have been taken to prevent any further damage to the organ during =   the restoration process. Just pray for us that we get back into the sanctuary by Sunday!   Thank you, Josh White FUMC, Graham TX www.fumcgraham.org; FUMC organ pics: www.geocities.com/polo_gap_tommie  
(back) Subject: Re: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 19:59:44 -0400   At the risk of undue self-promotion, let me invite you to consider my = CD of the Orwell VT 1-10 by E & G G Hook, 1865, with two ocatves of pedals and a 16' Bourdon. (Well, O.K.: half of the CD is the 1849 Hook at North Easton MA.) The Orwell organ is amazing!!!! On the CD I demonstrate the solo-plus-accompaniment effect achievable by playing the solo an octave higher and also "quinting" it, i;.e., playing the solo in fifths, with the lower note of the fifth an octave higher than written, thus forming a resultant. The results are so successful in the old signing-off theme = song of the Mormon tabernacle broadcasts, "As the Dew From Heaven Distilling," that the Raven Records folks, who did the CD, named the entire CD with = that title!! The ordinary person would ENVER KNOW that this is a one-manual organ.   I'm with Phil Cooper, whose enthusiasm for single-manual organs is unbridled and most worthy.   In addition, of course, with the modern potential of making each stop available on each of two manuals, greater flexibility could be had from a small number of ranks. I'd a thousand times rather play Orwell's 10 ranks, esp. if available on each of two manuals, than to play a 100-stop fake. The excellence of mid-century Hooks is so compelling, it about = drives me into ecstacy!!   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lacnaster PA   > From: quilisma@socal.rr.com > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2002 14:24:15 -0700 > To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: one-manual pipe organs vs. you-know-whats (grin) > > There are MANY *fine* 19th century one-manual organs still in use that > CAN play as much literature as a parish church of modest size would EVER > require. > > Something like: > > MANUAL - C-c4, 61 notes > > (exposed) > > 8' Open Diapason > 4' Octave > 2 2/3' Twelfth > 2' Fifteenth > > (enclosed) > > 16' Bourdon (1-12 outside swell box, possibly common with Pedal 16') > 8' Melodia > 8' Gamba > 4' Harmonic Flute > 8' Trumpet or Oboe > > Manual Sub-Octave Coupler > All stops divided at middle c > > PEDAL - C-f1, 30 notes > > 16' Sub Bass > 8' Violoncello > 8' Trumpet or Oboe (by transmission from Manual) > > Pedal to Pedal 10 2/3 (a favorite of Hook and Hastings on small organs) > Manual to Pedal > > If one draws the 16' Bourdon and the 4' Flute in the treble and plays > the right hand up an octave, and the 4' Flute and the 2' Fifteenth in > the bass and plays the left hand down an octave, most trios can be > accommodated, and so forth. > > The 4' Octave or 4' Flute played down an octave can accompany a c.f. on > the Trumpet or Oboe in the treble, or Melodia + Twelth, or whatever. > > The unenclosed Principal chorus will serve for a plenum in Bach; if a > fuller plenum is needed, one can play up an octave with the manual > sub-coupler. If a secondary chorus is needed, one could throw off the > sub-coupler and come down an octave, or retire the Twelfth and > Fifteenth. > > Alternatively, the resources COULD be spread over two manuals by means > of "either-or" pallets. > > If space and money was available, a celeste and a (treble) Cornet or > Sesquialtera might be desirable, and/or a Mixture. > > Of course, all this assumes SUPERB voicing and scaling, such as one > would find in a 19th century organ by Hook, Johnson, etc. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >